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Thread: dingy recommendations?

  1. #1
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    Default dingy recommendations?

    I discover I will (unexpectedly) need a dingy by May 1, and I haven't researched them before. I have a couple sheets of 6mm marine plywood and a bunch of scrap dimensional lumber. It would be great if it was light enough for one person to launch and retrieve, it doesn't need to store on the boat, or get towed. mostly a harbor thing. Advice?
    Ken

  2. #2
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    Default Re: dingy recommendations?

    Try a Phil Bolger Elegant Punt, an 8-ft pram. I built one and still have it, although I moved to a 10-footer.

    It's an excellent dinghy, and easy to build. In use, I found it needed a skeg at the aft end. Once I installed that it was easier to row straight, and I incorporated a hand-grip cutout into the skeg which made it easier to maneuver the boat upside-down on the dock.

    http://smallboats.com/boats_elegantpunt.htm

    But regarding dinghies, don't make them pieces of furniture. Just build them cleanly, and paint them. I wouldn't glass your either, since it will not be towed.

  3. #3
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    Default Re: dingy recommendations?

    How about this stitch and glue...from Bateau....not great if you have a passenger
    easy to build and no but joints ...3.5 sheets of plywood

  4. #4
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    Default Re: dingy recommendations?

    Bolger-Payson Elegant Punt
    Harry Bryan Ladybug, plywood version.
    Or a combination of the above
    OffCenterHarbor.com has a large “Best Dinghies “ article.

  5. #5
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    Default Re: dingy recommendations?

    You have a gazillion options, but the usage is unclear -- what is a "harbor thing"?? If rowing it out to a mooring only and left on the dock most of the time, you may want something wide, stable, burdensome and funky-looking to avoid theft. If rowing in a harbor for fun, you'll want something longer, much more slender and easy to row.
    "The enemies of reason have a certain blind look."
    Doctor Jacquin to Lieutenant D'Hubert, in Ridley Scott's first major film _The Duellists_.

  6. #6
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    Default

    CLC Eastport pram I know somebody that's selling one!
    Denise, Bristol PA, Oday30, Anchor Yacht Club, On tidal Delaware River. my current project; http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthre...0-Ducker-Resto

  7. #7
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    Default Re: dingy recommendations?

    +1 on the elegant punt if you want a dinghy no longer than a sheet of plywood.

    Jamie

  8. #8
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    Default Re: dingy recommendations?

    If you really want to keep it light, ditch the wood chine logs, bulkheads,fastenings,skeg.
    Use lumber for a seat and lammed rubrail only.

  9. #9
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    Default Re: dingy recommendations?

    Consider Dave Gentry's skin on frame pram. Plans sold by Duckworks

    http://gentrycustomboats.com/PRP.html
    Last edited by Bobcat; 01-12-2020 at 02:43 PM.
    Elect a clown expect a circus

  10. #10
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    Default Re: dingy recommendations?

    lotsa options to peruse on this page

    https://www.duckworks.com/rowboat-plans-s/267.htm

    sw
    "we are the people, our parents warned us about" (jb)

    steve

  11. #11
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    Default Re: dingy recommendations?

    The prams and dinghy designed by L. Francis Herreshoff are a joy to the eye as well as being very practical tenders. They are a good winter project and plank up easily. Designed to carry a load of crew, boat gear and supplies they are very practical boats to have.
    Here is the L Francis Herreshoff tender for the B.B. Crowninshield schooner "Martha". Looks to be an eight footer.
    Jay
    Last edited by Jay Greer; 01-13-2020 at 02:20 PM.

  12. #12
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    Default Re: dingy recommendations?

    I have also been looking for dinghy ideas, for cruising in H28 Holiday. Last summer, we towed an 11' flatiron skiff for 5 weeks, and might have been happier with a smaller boat stored on top of the house.

    ToddBay.jpg

    Design criteria:
    -- Pretty, when upside-down on deck.
    -- Max 7-6 x 3-8 on deck, with minimum vertical dimension (no curvy sheer!) - cut-out transom for companionway hatch.
    -- Pleasant to row around a harbor with 2 passengers, 3 in a pinch.
    -- Lightweight, towable.
    -- Possibly 3-part nesting, with the center section usable by one person.
    -- Stitch-and-glue.
    -- Two skegs, to double as handrails on deck.

    Any ideas?

  13. #13
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    Default Re: dingy recommendations?

    I built a 12 foot Summer Breeze. Uses two sheets of ply and some directional lumber. It sails pretty well; rows, OK, runs 4-mph with an electric trolling motor. I wouldn't want to row it much more than maybe 100 yards and three adults is max payload( calm water, short distance). It weighs about 90 pounds, built from 1/4-inch Occume.

    As said, if you outline the specifics of your needs, the suggested boats can be more on point.

    Kevin
    There are two kinds of boaters: those who have run aground, and those who lie about it.

  14. #14
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    Default Re: dingy recommendations?

    Here is the pram we use for our H28 "Bright Star". At seven feet it is all we need. I like a dingy with transoms on both ends as it saves Bright Star's hull from pointy bow dings under the counter! Gotta add some chafing guard to the rails though. Scary
    Jay

  15. #15
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    Default Re: dingy recommendations?

    I'll just throw in a vlog on building an unremarkable nesting dinghy https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CUmmcRfMKZw which is mainly interesting because of the amazing nautical feats on the cheap by this somewhat disabled young driven clever guy (kind of cult status on youtube). Surprised to see he broke all his boat ribs in the bending since his improvisations usually turn out teflon.
    "Liberalism, once professing to advocate liberty, now is a movement for control over property, trade, work, amusements, education, and religion" - Russell Kirk

  16. #16
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    Default Re: dingy recommendations?

    Here are 2 quick and dirty solutions :
    Italy161.jpg
    and
    Italy160.jpg

  17. #17
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    Default Re: dingy recommendations?

    Screen Shot 2020-01-15 at 8.41.09 AM.jpg

    Wonderful! Or perhaps a pair of nesting coracles?

  18. #18
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    Default Re: dingy recommendations?

    Quote Originally Posted by swoody126 View Post
    lotsa options to peruse on this page

    https://www.duckworks.com/rowboat-plans-s/267.htm

    sw
    Has anyone used the ALBY design From Duckworks? I like the "V" at the pram bow but the excessive rocker makes me fear that it will dig a hole in the water if I ever want to tow it. Towing is not in the original spec. but this is serving a boat that is only 26.5' Centerboard, and if I ever do need to tow a dingy, I'd hate it to be a dog.

    Ken

    Ken

  19. #19
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    Default Re: dingy recommendations?

    Quote Originally Posted by kbowen View Post
    Has anyone used the ALBY design From Duckworks? I like the "V" at the pram bow but the excessive rocker makes me fear that it will dig a hole in the water if I ever want to tow it. Towing is not in the original spec. but this is serving a boat that is only 26.5' Centerboard, and if I ever do need to tow a dingy, I'd hate it to be a dog.

    Ken

    Ken
    Ken, i towed my Portuguese Dinghy behind my 21' diesel trawler and it did just fine

    the Portuguese Dinghy has a lot of rocker too

    IMG_1334.jpg

    mounted the eye down low

    IMG_1328.jpg

    followed obediently

    IMG_1365.jpg

    i'm knot seeing any more rocker in Alby than mine

    looks like she might could fill your bill

    sw
    "we are the people, our parents warned us about" (jb)

    steve

  20. #20
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    Default Re: dingy recommendations?

    Quote Originally Posted by Thorne View Post
    You have a gazillion options, but the usage is unclear -- what is a "harbor thing"?? If rowing it out to a mooring only and left on the dock most of the time, you may want something wide, stable, burdensome and funky-looking to avoid theft. If rowing in a harbor for fun, you'll want something longer, much more slender and easy to row.
    Quote Originally Posted by Breakaway View Post

    As said, if you outline the specifics of your needs, the suggested boats can be more on point.

    Kevin
    As always... the more you tell us, the better our advice will be.
    David G
    Harbor Woodworks
    https://www.facebook.com/HarborWoodworks/

    "It was a Sunday morning and Goddard gave thanks that there were still places where one could worship in temples not made by human hands." -- L. F. Herreshoff (The Compleat Cruiser)

  21. #21
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    Default Re: dingy recommendations?

    To the post above about specific use: I am hoping for a mooring can in Montrose Harbor, Chicago, May 1. The dingys are locked on racks and need to be muscled into the water, or if the lake get's any higher, I might need hip boots to get to the racks. I don't need to get everyone out to the boat by dingy. If I get out there with one or two others I can come up to the dock and load people, food, etc. I don't know how far the row will be because spaces haven't been assigned yet, but on a map the harbor looks to be about 1000 x 2000' at the extreme. There is a possibility I will need to move from one harbor to another during the summer, and in that case it would be good if the thing tows reasonably well because power boats churn the heck out of the downtown lakefront. What else can I tell you?

    Ken

  22. #22
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    Default Re: dingy recommendations?

    Given that small bit of added info, I'd lean toward the lightest possible. Skin on frame.

    http://gentrycustomboats.com/Planspage.html

    http://gaboats.com/boats/
    David G
    Harbor Woodworks
    https://www.facebook.com/HarborWoodworks/

    "It was a Sunday morning and Goddard gave thanks that there were still places where one could worship in temples not made by human hands." -- L. F. Herreshoff (The Compleat Cruiser)

  23. #23
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    Default Re: dingy recommendations?

    If you have two sheets of plywood and not that much time, Phil Bolgerís Nymph, or Rubens Nymph, would be a good choice.

  24. #24
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    Default Re: dingy recommendations?

    Oughtred Humble bee pram or the Auk tender.

    The Humble Bee for doing alot of towing, the Auk for more rowing. Sailing rig options.





    Joel White Nutshell

    Last edited by Edward Pearson; 01-16-2020 at 08:19 AM.

  25. #25
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    Default Re: dingy recommendations?

    doesn't get any simpler than the six hour canoe, put oarlock on it or use a kayak paddle. 100_3202.jpg

  26. #26
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    Default Re: dingy recommendations?

    This is another lightweight alternative and you get to use your marine ply. I was only a passenger but I was impressed by its manners.
    https://www.gaboats.com/boats/blackfly8.html

  27. #27
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    Default Re: dingy recommendations?

    I raced for a number of years out of Columbia Yacht Club in Chicago.

    After rowing a number of dinghys including Opti, CLCís Eastport Pram, Walker Bay,
    Bic Sportyak, El Toro and few oddballs I determined the El Toro suited my needs best which are close to yours. I do, however, transport my dinghy to the mooring field and than carry it to the lake..

    I built the Glenn L Sabotina which as a row boat is functionally identical to a Sabot or El Toro. Tracks and handles waves better than a flat bottom and is more stable with more capacity than rounder hull shapes or ones with pointy bows. It rows well with two and acceptably with three men and a cooler. Weighs about 45#. Itís well behaved under tow. I donít tow often so I havenít had the need to tow it when itís been rough but I wouldnít hesitate to do so.

    , 53A4EC21-AFD8-46ED-8562-F940EA861002.jpg

    If you put skids of Ipe or UHMW you can easily slid and flip over a dinghy twice as heavy.

    I built Gentryís Ruth which I love and has proven remarkably tough but I would never leave a SOF at dinghy dock. To many errant oars and pointy bows.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  28. #28
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    Default Re: dingy recommendations?

    Thanks for the nods, folks. Lots of great suggestions, too - and sifting through the options is half the fun.
    Quote Originally Posted by Jfitzger View Post
    I built Gentry’s Ruth which I love and has proven remarkably tough but I would never leave a SOF at dinghy dock. To many errant oars and pointy bows.
    Meh - oars or pointy things aren't going to bother SOF at all. Razor knives, however . . . .
    I'm happy to hear that you love your Ruth - she is still my favorite.

    No dolly to use at the club? You might consider one of those with the built in wheel - Seal Cove skiffs and whatnot. Not sure how well some of them would tow, however.

    Anyway, a some pics of my Piankatank River Pram - which can also be built a bit lighter (38lbs or so) without the sailing bits. She is a modification of a Herreshoff pram.
    Brian Scarboroughs Mom.jpg
    Brian Scarboroughs 4.jpg
    Dennis'.jpg

    Dave
    Last edited by DGentry; 01-17-2020 at 09:19 AM.

  29. #29
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    Default Re: dingy recommendations?

    I will certainly differ to Daveís SOF experience. Iíve become so smitten with my Ruth that I probably baby it more than I need to. Shortly after putting on my last coat of finish I did have a halogen work light fall 6í from the rafters of my garage and land corner side down on the underside of Ruth. It bounced off without leaving a mark.

    I would still be careful about leaving a dinghy, built of any material, that I really cared about at a dinghy dock.

  30. #30
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    Default Re: dingy recommendations?

    Quote Originally Posted by Jfitzger View Post
    I will certainly differ to Dave’s SOF experience. I’ve become so smitten with my Ruth that I probably baby it more than I need to. Shortly after putting on my last coat of finish I did have a halogen work light fall 6’ from the rafters of my garage and land corner side down on the underside of Ruth. It bounced off without leaving a mark.

    I would still be careful about leaving a dinghy, built of any material, that I really cared about at a dinghy dock.
    I think you meant 'defer'?
    David G
    Harbor Woodworks
    https://www.facebook.com/HarborWoodworks/

    "It was a Sunday morning and Goddard gave thanks that there were still places where one could worship in temples not made by human hands." -- L. F. Herreshoff (The Compleat Cruiser)

  31. #31
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    Default Re: dingy recommendations?

    Quote Originally Posted by David G View Post
    I think you meant 'defer'?
    I do indeed mean defer.

  32. #32
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    Default Re: dingy recommendations?

    Quote Originally Posted by 62816inBerlin View Post
    Here are 2 quick and dirty solutions :
    Italy161.jpg
    and
    Italy160.jpg
    I'll bet that first one tows like a brick!
    Bird

  33. #33
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    Default Re: dingy recommendations?

    And here is one of the best!
    Jay
    https://www.hilmarkboats.com/herreshoff-pram.html

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