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Thread: some motorbikes. . .

  1. #1786
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    Default Re: some motorbikes. . .

    speaking of Jay Leno’s garage

    The Yellostone bus. not a motorcycle.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dbw3Rkl3AAc

  2. #1787
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    Default Re: some motorbikes. . .

    Quote Originally Posted by Garret View Post
    The Fuse above? Nope. Ducati Monster engine - 4 stroke with desmodromic valves.
    No, the Yamaha TDR 250 picture-quoted in my post.

  3. #1788
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    Default Re: some motorbikes. . .

    Quote Originally Posted by Clarkey View Post
    No, the Yamaha TDR 250 picture-quoted in my post.
    Gotcha. I think he was using the Yamaha as an example of how 2 stroke exhausts are sometimes made that way.
    "If it ain't broke, you're not trying." - Red Green

  4. #1789
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    Default Re: some motorbikes. . .

    Yep, pie cut cones to curve expansion chambers on a 2-stroke makes sense for a hand built bike, of which that particular TDR is an example, but not actually the one I was looking for.

    The Fuse's owner/designer said the pie-cut exhaust was just to give it a handbuilt look. A lot of work just for show.
    'When I leave I don't know what I'm hoping to find. When I leave I don't know what I'm leaving behind...'

  5. #1790
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    Default Re: some motorbikes. . .

    Simpler is better, except when complicated looks really cool.

  6. #1791
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    Default Re: some motorbikes. . .

    Honda happened to release some strange designs.
    Gerard.
    SCHOONER FOR EVER, GOELETTE A PERPETE

    http://www.goelette-anthea.fr

  7. #1792
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    Default Re: some motorbikes. . .

    but. . .
    Simpler is better, except when complicated looks really cool.

  8. #1793
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    Default Re: some motorbikes. . .

    you meet the nicest people on a honda

    Simpler is better, except when complicated looks really cool.

  9. #1794
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    Default Re: some motorbikes. . .

    Simpler is better, except when complicated looks really cool.

  10. #1795
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    Default Re: some motorbikes. . .

    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Pless View Post
    Imagine hundreds of those. what is it?

  11. #1796
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    Default Re: some motorbikes. . .

    its an old honda scooter with the headlamp/windshield assembly removed

    140 mpg
    Simpler is better, except when complicated looks really cool.

  12. #1797
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    Default Re: some motorbikes. . .

    I mentioned to my daughter that I decided the Yamaha TW200 would be the ideal motorcycle for here and she said “You’re not getting a motorcycle are you?” I said of course not just that I thought the Honda Trail 125 was the bike but I changed my mind. My 1500 watt ebike is plenty. But I keep thinkingnof a better ebike and really like the concept of 65 lb e motorcycles. A couple hp isn’t much but is scads more than my body puts out.

  13. #1798
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    Default Re: some motorbikes. . .

    Started roughing in a couple of new exhaust valves this afternoon. These are SS "blanks" the head and stem length come as unfinished.
    Head diameter, thickness, and seat angles are done. Stem length, keeper grooves and heat treat the tip, next stop.

    B46748FF-3150-4BAD-A62A-ECD35D4998F4.jpg

  14. #1799
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    Default Re: some motorbikes. . .

    This is a good watch, vintage racing sidecar makes a road trip:




    https://youtu.be/PNgYW5N95z8

  15. #1800
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    Default Re: some motorbikes. . .

    I'd much rather lay in my bunk all freakin day lookin at Youtube videos .

  16. #1801
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  17. #1802
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    Default Re: some motorbikes. . .

    I think I could handle one of these little jiggersvw sidecar.jpg

  18. #1803
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    Default Re: some motorbikes. . .

    That JAP-Norton is wonderful! NorJAP? JAPton? With Tritons so well known, I guess it'd have to be JAPton.
    "If it ain't broke, you're not trying." - Red Green

  19. #1804
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    Default Re: some motorbikes. . .

    I bought this 2014, 900 Scrambler with just 3000 miles on it for primary transportation. I still walk out the door in the evening thinking I need a jacket for warmth. There are a bunch of abandoned roads connecting small villages all over the Yucatan Peninsula
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Last edited by Chris Coose; 11-23-2022 at 07:19 AM.
    Study Peace

  20. #1805
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    Default Re: some motorbikes. . .

    Quote Originally Posted by Chris Coose View Post
    I bought this 2014, 900 Scrambler with just 3000 miles on it for primary transportation. I still walk out the door in the evening thinking I need a jacket for warmth. There are a bunch of abandoned roads connecting small villages all over the Yucatan Peninsula
    great bike. Congratulations! AGATT. No such things as a little ride.
    Without friends none of this is possible.

  21. #1806
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    Default Re: some motorbikes. . .

    Without friends none of this is possible.

  22. #1807
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    Default Re: some motorbikes. . .

    Nice! Very nice!
    There's a lot of things they didn't tell me when I signed on with this outfit....

  23. #1808
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    Default Re: some motorbikes. . .

    That is one beautiful bike, I love the looks, but how does anyone ride it without burning his pants off on those exhaust pipes?

  24. #1809
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    Default Re: some motorbikes. . .

    motorcyclists used to wear high leather boots and chaps
    Simpler is better, except when complicated looks really cool.

  25. #1810
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    Default Re: some motorbikes. . .

    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Pless View Post
    motorcyclists used to wear high leather boots and chaps
    but for rollie free of course
    Simpler is better, except when complicated looks really cool.

  26. #1811
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    Default some motorbikes. . .

    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Pless View Post
    motorcyclists used to wear high leather boots and chaps

    Gasoline boots. Semi-custom classic motorcycle boots, made in Mexico in a town that's been making boots for centuries. $300, 4-6 week lead time. Your choice of leather, stitching, sole.

    https://gasolinaboots.com/index.php/...classic_boots/





    Here's flash pairs people have had built.



    Last edited by Nicholas Carey; 11-23-2022 at 11:30 AM.
    You would not enjoy Nietzsche, sir. He is fundamentally unsound. — P.G. Wodehouse (Carry On, Jeeves)

  27. #1812
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    Default Re: some motorbikes. . .

    1917 Dayton Motor Wheel...

    B8FBEEBB-FBB8-44E6-801D-98F8B9EC5494.jpg


    What do you do when you need carburetor parts?

    Just call some fool with more time than money...

    97FF8E95-81BE-4D14-B183-4AB0E4480BFC.jpg

    3F255323-9FA0-4A1E-98E2-0643F3E85E15.jpg

  28. #1813
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    Default Re: some motorbikes. . .

    Nicely done !
    Even a fish wouldn’t get in trouble if it kept it's mouth shut.

  29. #1814
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    Default Re: some motorbikes. . .

    How did you accomplish the knurled part ?



    Rick
    Charter Member - - Professional Procrastinators Association of America - - putting things off since 1965 " I'll get around to it tomorrow, .... maybe "

  30. #1815
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    Default Re: some motorbikes. . .

    There are not many of these carburetors out there (none that I could find) and I had to wing it after searching images of this particular "motor wheel". I copied what I saw esthetically and based everything (thread pitch/bore dimensions) on the existing carb body. The "motor wheel" was built in this country by A.O. Smith (The plumbing company) and later by Briggs and Stratton. If you search for "Smith Motor Wheel" you can learn more. This version (Dayton) was sold as an assembled motorized bicycle (front wheel drive) rather than a Powered wheel that could be fitted to any bicycle. The was also a powered cart.
    There is a nice example of a restored motor wheel in the Owls Head Transportation museum collection.
    Anyway it was a fun little project. Today I fussed and got all the copper crush washers and packing for the adjustable main jet. Seal and gasket technology was still in it's infancy, so those bits are crude and simple but effective leather and soft copper.

    "Knurling" is a fairly simple process using pressure and rotating "wheels" or "knurls" that are forced into contact with a round rotating piece.
    This below is a typical simple lathe knurling tool, there are variations of the technique and some calculations of diameters to make all work correctly. (You don't want to end up with 23-1/2 serrations!)
    The part is turned (cut) just slightly up to the ends of the knurled area to neatly define it. The are hand held knurling devices for various applications. It takes a surprising amount of pressure to deform the surface even in bronze

    (I'm sure there are dozens of u-tube videos covering it in far better detail than I can explain!)
    2EC3B8F5-0EDF-4328-BEA9-425320CC24AF.jpeg

    edit to add this pic which shows the original carb:

    C8DFC602-4B1A-48B8-A75F-CAE12B9524CB.jpg

    199AE678-420F-408A-8231-28BD4C01A0E4.jpg
    Last edited by Canoeyawl; 11-26-2022 at 12:01 AM.

  31. #1816
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    Default Re: some motorbikes. . .

    Do you post on either of the motor bicycle forums?
    Blind internal threading to a shoulder is no big deal with a CNC. Done a lot of by rack of eye on a semi production scale I did for several years. An internal stop groove which you could have used takes a lot of the thrill out.

    Tom

  32. #1817
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    Default Re: some motorbikes. . .

    I figured someone (you Tom) might notice that blind internal thread detail
    (The thrill of a crash keeps you on your toes)
    Lathe running in reverse, rt. hand internal thread tool bit, working from the shoulder out, travel indicator on the front of the carriage - piece of cake
    With an ancient hss cutter I keep in my drawer just for this sort of stuff.

    (.800x24, probably 13/16" which is an old kitchen faucet thread- A.O. Smith right?)

  33. #1818
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    Default Re: some motorbikes. . .

    i have a question?

    what material is the crankcase, cylinder, and head on this motor cast from? the cylinder and head itself specifically? is it cast iron that's been plated?

    Simpler is better, except when complicated looks really cool.

  34. #1819
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    Default Re: some motorbikes. . .

    I don't have the entire thing in my possession, but I have looked at a hundred images of them. The cylinder and head are cast en block of iron, the crankcase is aluminum, carburetor is red brass, the wheel itself is stamped sheet metal riveted to a machined hub. One of the two "ears" or arms, the one that mounts to the bicycle, is plated iron the other is en bloc with the crankcase. The iron and brass bits were nickel plated, the aluminum was polished. I am still trying to figure out who designed the carburetor.

    It is a four cycle engine, with the really clever bit being the camshaft. It is an 1/8 speed cam with 4 lobes and the camshaft itself is the drive axle for the wheel, so direct drive. (Note, almost all 4 stroke cycle engine camshafts operate at 1/2 crankshaft speed)

    Blueprints are here:
    https://www.scribd.com/doc/60156136/...yer-Blueprints

    This is the best pic I could find of this carburetor, which I more or less copied, choosing a coarser knurl for a better grip:

    8C71B6A9-6212-4F32-BD61-C57E0339FC34.jpg
    I noted some similarity to other (ancient) British carburetors and in trying to guess who may have originally built this carb design as it has some characteristics with S.U. I was led down quite a few rabbit holes.

    The "Motor Wheel" itself was an immigrant from England developed and patented in 1908
    see: https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arthur_William_Wall

    A "rabbit hole" of some interest was the one the led me to A.O. Smith making stamped steel frames for Henry Ford's model T to the tune of 40,000 per year. It must have quite a large and noisy factory punching out automobile frames 24 hours a day...
    All of which just helped confirm my suspicions of incest in the automotive industry.

    There are rumors that Porsche had an electric version of this thing early on, but I can't find the bicycle application.
    The first wheel hub motor was patented in 1884:
    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wheel_hub_motor

    (apologies for the digression)

  35. #1820
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    Default Re: some motorbikes. . .

    Hey! I have a knurling tool. Some neat old guy gave it to me.

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