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Thread: some motorbikes. . .

  1. #1681
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    Default Re: some motorbikes. . .

    Quote Originally Posted by Garret View Post
    I'd never heard of a Bergmeister before

    https://albany.craigslist.org/mcy/d/...533493168.html

    No connection, etc.



    Looks like it's a Victoria Bergmeister V35 (1956). Made by the Victoria Bicycle Company of Nürnberg, Germany from 1951–1959.

    This listing at Bonham's auction house: https://www.bonhams.com/auctions/22720/lot/300/ has a lot of good pictures, and notes that the hammer price was EU 12,880 in 2015. It goes on to say:

    Founded in Nürnberg, Germany in 1886, bicycle-maker Victoria added motorcycles to its portfolio towards the end of the 19th Century. After WW2, small-capacity two-strokes formed the mainstay of production and then in 1951 Victoria announced its first four-stroke model of the post-war era: the V35 Bergmeister (Mountain Master). The V35 was powered by a transversely mounted v-twin engine, and featured shaft final drive and an unusual four-speed, chain-and-sprockets transmission (there are no gears in the 'gearbox'), an arrangement its designer Richard Küchen had first used while employed by Zündapp in the early 1930s. Modern for the times, the V35 boasted plunger rear suspension, a telescopic front fork and full-width alloy brakes.

    Engine is a 350cc transverse twin. 7.5:1 compression ratio, 64.0 mm bore x 54.0 mm stroke. Cranked out 21.0 hp (15.3 kW) @ 6,300 RPM.

    Here's a couple of pictures of ones in slightly better shape:



    You would not enjoy Nietzsche, sir. He is fundamentally unsound. — P.G. Wodehouse (Carry On, Jeeves)

  2. #1682
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    Default Re: some motorbikes. . .

    Last edited by Paul Pless; 09-16-2022 at 12:47 PM.
    Simpler is better, except when complicated looks really cool.

  3. #1683
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    Default Re: some motorbikes. . .

    That is a motorcycle?
    I'd much rather lay in my bunk all freakin day lookin at Youtube videos .

  4. #1684
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    Default Re: some motorbikes. . .

    Quote Originally Posted by Nicholas Carey View Post
    Looks like it's a Victoria Bergmeister V35 (1956). Made by the Victoria Bicycle Company of Nürnberg, Germany from 1951–1959.

    This listing at Bonham's auction house: https://www.bonhams.com/auctions/22720/lot/300/ has a lot of good pictures, and notes that the hammer price was EU 12,880 in 2015. It goes on to say:

    Founded in Nürnberg, Germany in 1886, bicycle-maker Victoria added motorcycles to its portfolio towards the end of the 19th Century. After WW2, small-capacity two-strokes formed the mainstay of production and then in 1951 Victoria announced its first four-stroke model of the post-war era: the V35 Bergmeister (Mountain Master). The V35 was powered by a transversely mounted v-twin engine, and featured shaft final drive and an unusual four-speed, chain-and-sprockets transmission (there are no gears in the 'gearbox'), an arrangement its designer Richard Küchen had first used while employed by Zündapp in the early 1930s. Modern for the times, the V35 boasted plunger rear suspension, a telescopic front fork and full-width alloy brakes.

    Engine is a 350cc transverse twin. 7.5:1 compression ratio, 64.0 mm bore x 54.0 mm stroke. Cranked out 21.0 hp (15.3 kW) @ 6,300 RPM.

    Here's a couple of pictures of ones in slightly better shape:

    A minor quibble, but that engine is mounted longitudinally, not transversely. Most motorcycles have transversely mounted engines.

  5. #1685
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    Default Re: some motorbikes. . .

    The pistons are a transverse V however.

  6. #1686
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    Default Re: some motorbikes. . .

    Quote Originally Posted by Gordon Bartlett View Post
    A minor quibble, but that engine is mounted longitudinally, not transversely. Most motorcycles have transversely mounted engines.
    In general, that's true. But motorcycle nomenclature differs. From Wikipedia's article listing motorcycles by engine type:

    "A transverse engine is an engine mounted in a vehicle so that the engine's crankshaft axis is perpendicular to the direction of travel. In a longitudinal engine configuration, the engine's crankshaft axis is parallel with the direction of travel.

    However, the description of the orientation of "V" and "flat" motorcycle engines differs from this convention. Motorcycles with a V-twin engine mounted with its crankshaft mounted in line with the frame, e.g. the Honda CX series, are said to have "transverse" engines,[1][2] while motorcycles with a V-twin mounted with its crankshaft mounted perpendicular to the frame, e.g. most Harley-Davidsons, are said to have "longitudinal" engines.[1][2]
    "

    I disagree with their statement that "[t]his convention uses the longest horizontal dimension (length or width) of the engine as its axis instead of the line of the crankshaft." I believe it has to do whether or not piston travel is inline or transverse with respect to to the axis of the bike — and that has more to do, historically, with the nomenclature being defined by Moto Guzzi's billing of their bikes as having a "transverse vee twin engine".

    It's more "(transverse vee) twin engine" rather than "transverse (vee twin engine)"

    [And if you actually look at that Wikipedia article, the list itself isn't consistent with the quoted definition [above].

    For instance, this BMW R/90 is listed as having a longitudinal flat twin:



    whilst this Douglas Dragonfly is listed as having a transverse flat twin:

    Last edited by Nicholas Carey; 09-16-2022 at 03:09 PM.
    You would not enjoy Nietzsche, sir. He is fundamentally unsound. — P.G. Wodehouse (Carry On, Jeeves)

  7. #1687
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    Default Re: some motorbikes. . .

    Interesting, also crazy.

  8. #1688
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    Default Re: some motorbikes. . .

    Quote Originally Posted by Nicholas Carey View Post
    In general, that's true. But motorcycle nomenclature differs. From Wikipedia's article listing motorcycles by engine type:

    "A transverse engine is an engine mounted in a vehicle so that the engine's crankshaft axis is perpendicular to the direction of travel. In a longitudinal engine configuration, the engine's crankshaft axis is parallel with the direction of travel.

    However, the description of the orientation of "V" and "flat" motorcycle engines differs from this convention. Motorcycles with a V-twin engine mounted with its crankshaft mounted in line with the frame, e.g. the Honda CX series, are said to have "transverse" engines,[1][2] while motorcycles with a V-twin mounted with its crankshaft mounted perpendicular to the frame, e.g. most Harley-Davidsons, are said to have "longitudinal" engines.[1][2]
    "

    I disagree with their statement that "[t]his convention uses the longest horizontal dimension (length or width) of the engine as its axis instead of the line of the crankshaft." I believe it has to do whether or not piston travel is inline or transverse with respect to to the axis of the bike — and that has more to do, historically, with the nomenclature being defined by Moto Guzzi's billing of their bikes as having a "transverse vee twin engine".
    We'll, alrighty then. I guess I stand corrected.
    But I think it's dumb.
    It seems even weirder after having read that last part because for a few years in the early/mid 1980's, I owned a 1972 Moto Guzzi 850 Eldorado. I bought it as a basket case and was never exposed to their ad copy.
    Had anyone asked, I'm sure I would have described it as a longitudinally mounted engine.
    And I was reminded of it every time I blipped the throttle when standing still.

  9. #1689
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    Default Re: some motorbikes. . .

    24B87DF8-5AFC-41C7-862D-371BA199E87A.jpg

    This one is still an outstanding ride. Better in many ways than the much loved euro rider.
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  10. #1690
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    Default Re: some motorbikes. . .

    Tell us more about it Ted..? I think it is too small for me but I have always admired it from afar.

  11. #1691
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    Default Re: some motorbikes. . .

    Quote Originally Posted by psychology
    Tell us more about it Ted..? I think it is too small for me but I have always admired it from afar.
    It is one of those interesting combinations that does not do everything great but in combination it exceeds what is the whole. The tried and true large 1200cc motor feels tucked into what many would consider a 600cc frame. Rides more like a supermotard than a decked out classic opposed twin german ride. For urban style riding, with stop and go, gas and brake it is an exceptional fun bike to ride. 0 to 60 (100 kph) is a thrill. The power curve between 65 to 80 is a little flat. Over 85 it returns to a thrill ride up to 120 plus. I find just putting about at 75 to 90 kph is where the bike becomes quite gentlemanly and get good gas mileage. I average about 46 mpg in most riding outings and can try to pull 50 when just stretching out the economy.

    This bike does a nice job canyon carving with a weight balance low that is confidence inspiring. I would say it feels a lot close to like that Yamaha Tenere 700 (one of those exceptional modern Japanese all rounders) except with more power and torque. With these 80/20 road to adventure tires and stock shocks, i feel quite comfortable on fire roads, broken pavement and even hard packed dirt. If I ever get the money to get a second set of rims for it, it might be fun to get some semi knobbies for more TET or off road explorations. The bike does not have a tach. There are ones I can get but really there is no reason for one. Feel and sound tell me everything I need to know. I like the bike came with superb traction control and abs - I really can't imagine turning them off even if some others demand that. The stock heated grips are nice and sure make a difference when riding in the rain or cold. I think I may get a larger fly screen for wind deflection but it is not that needed either. I did end up buying a reader to reset my bike when I do my own work and change fluids - the bikes computer on the minimal speed indicator screen reminds you of things which for a gas a go kinda guy maybe a good thing. As you can imagine the BMW bike dealer charges way to much but then again they are there when you need them which is great insurance. Most of the engine parts for it are held in stock and can be picked up on a whim - another rarity in the modern era and age of Covid.

    I do admire that new bikes like the R1800, K1600, the new RT and have only sat on the new R1300GS. The big tour bikes are not for me although I can respect what the psychology they offer to their riders and the status they must bring to ones ego. Frankly most of the bikes in this brands line up are excellent - each with a carved out niche. In truth, riding this past week in Europe and loving those lovely one and two lanes roads - this homage bike would be great tourer stock with a simple removable travel bag. But in the style of riding I am coming around to, maybe the Indian made BMW 310GS may have even more merit there but without the top end speed. As for the current American continent riding and driving - one may need a bit more oomph as my fellow citizens do not respect the 2 wheeled rider much, do not give the space needed to safely share the road as they do in more civilized places and aspects of longer rides often require more in stretches on the super slabs.

    68150761877__0BA7667A-E0AF-44AD-B481-7BF12889AAF4.jpg

    I can go nearly anywhere the true GSs go. It took me 3 years to pay it off. I have no regrets.
    Last edited by Ted Hoppe; 09-17-2022 at 01:33 PM.
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  12. #1692
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    Default Re: some motorbikes. . .

    Thank you so much for that generous run down of your R9T Ted. It sure sounds and looks sweet.

  13. #1693
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    Default Re: some motorbikes. . .

    Quote Originally Posted by Ted Hoppe View Post
    Rides more like a supermotard than a decked out classic opposed twin german ride.
    ok now

    we're gonna need hoonigan pics and or video
    wheelies, stoppies, and feet up donuts will suffice for now
    get kc to run the camera
    i know there's a convenient navy pier nearby
    Simpler is better, except when complicated looks really cool.

  14. #1694
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    Default Re: some motorbikes. . .


  15. #1695
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    Default Re: some motorbikes. . .

    A late summer ride up the canyon. Some of the Aspen are just starting to turn color.

    IMG_7773.jpg

  16. #1696
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    Default Re: some motorbikes. . .


  17. #1697
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    Default Re: some motorbikes. . .

    Another day, another canyon to ride. It is good to have airhead friends!

    IMG_7788.jpg

  18. #1698
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    Default Re: some motorbikes. . .

    Is that a Hannigan with a weird wind screen?

  19. #1699
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    Default Re: some motorbikes. . .

    Quote Originally Posted by timber_cruiser View Post
    A late summer ride up the canyon. Some of the Aspen are just starting to turn color.

    IMG_7773.jpg
    That is a perfect looking motorcycle.

  20. #1700
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    Default Re: some motorbikes. . .

    Quote Originally Posted by LeeG View Post
    That is a perfect looking motorcycle.
    Yep. Just what I was thinking.

  21. #1701
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    Default Re: some motorbikes. . .

    Quote Originally Posted by StevenBauer View Post
    Yep. Just what I was thinking.
    Thanks guys, I love to ride this bike on canyon roads. This engine has nice torque and power coming out of turns. Certainly not a high performance bike, but it always makes me smile.

  22. #1702
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    Default Re: some motorbikes. . .

    Quote Originally Posted by Tom from Rubicon View Post
    Is that a Hannigan with a weird wind screen?
    Yah, the original windscreen broke so my friend made this DIY version, still a work in progress...

  23. #1703
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    Default Re: some motorbikes. . .

    I've got a Hannigan stashed away in the rafters. Rode a lot of miles behind that fairing, big but effective.
    Steve

    If you would have a good boat, be a good guy when you build her - honest, careful, patient, strong.
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  24. #1704
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    Default Re: some motorbikes. . .

    The first few minutes of this are the bikes...and a few more about 18 minutes in. I'll post it on the Sports Car thread, too.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=txohPbN1kjY&t=558s

  25. #1705
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    Default Re: some motorbikes. . .

    More interesting stuff on Silodrome( can't link it on this technology), google it.
    An Indian model which was basically a badge engineered Royal Enfield.
    Indian-Trailblazer-6-scaled-e1662744051144-1600x1096.jpg

  26. #1706
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    Default Re: some motorbikes. . .

    And the 500cc "Woodsman"

    A60D4A45-B024-4F9D-B783-BEC733F4EC94.jpg

  27. #1707
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    Default Re: some motorbikes. . .

    Two prototype Indian/Vincent hybrids were built. The first was an Indian Chief with a 998cc Vincent Rapide V twin engine shoehorned in. In this picture we see Phil Vincent in the saddle.



    Two Indian/Vincent prototypes were constructed; one with a Vincent engine in a modified Indian frame, the other a Vincent Rapide modified to American specification and using some Indian parts and electrics. This is the second prototype.

    Simpler is better, except when complicated looks really cool.

  28. #1708
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    Default Re: some motorbikes. . .

    Quote Originally Posted by Canoeyawl View Post
    How many drill bits did that cost?

  29. #1709
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    Default Re: some motorbikes. . .

    Did it all (there's two rotors stacked up there) with one drill bit!

    (But it is some sort of stainless, so I bought 2 just in case, screw machine length, 135° split point, USA cobalt HSS, 550 rpm no center drill)

  30. #1710
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    Default Re: some motorbikes. . .

    I'd much rather lay in my bunk all freakin day lookin at Youtube videos .

  31. #1711
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    Default Re: some motorbikes. . .

    Great post, thanks PISN. Weaving has saved my bacon several times, it's not just for AI nav cars. The meat-nav variety is pretty scary too.

  32. #1712
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    Default Re: some motorbikes. . .

    Okay not sure if this has been shown here but I gotta do it. Harley got it right this time. Sportster S 1250, the new Sportster. Liquid cooled Revolution motor, 121 HP, 94 ft/lbs torque.

    I actually rode this bike today and never have I ever found and ridden a bike that was this right. Right mix of sport, power and cruiser. Best test ride ever and this is the bike that checks all of the blocks.



    Chad
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  33. #1713
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    Default Re: some motorbikes. . .

    SilverWing.
    Seen yesterday inLecce.
    Perfect condition.
    20220928_111049.jpg

    20220927_205346.jpg
    Gerard.
    SCHOONER FOR EVER, GOELETTE A PERPETE

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  34. #1714
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    Default Re: some motorbikes. . .

    Without friends none of this is possible.

  35. #1715
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    Default Re: some motorbikes. . .

    ^ tuneable wheelie control
    Simpler is better, except when complicated looks really cool.

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