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Thread: Future of seafood

  1. #1
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    Angry Future of seafood

    All seafood will run out in 2050, say scientists.

    The world's stocks of seafood will have collapsed by 2050 at present rates of destruction by fishing, scientists said yesterday.

    A four-year study of 7,800 marine species around the world's ecosystems has concluded that the long-term trend is clear and predictable.
    Nov 3, 2006
    https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/ukn...cientists.html

    Can anyone provide an update on this 2006 report?

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Future of seafood

    I did find this:

    NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC SOCIETY NEWSROOM

    Will the Ocean Ever Run Out of Fish?

    By Ayana Elizabeth Johnson and Jennifer Jacquet What’s the deal with overfishing? What’s at stake? And what can we do about it? We teamed up with the good folks at TEDEd on this animated short to explain. Punchline: Wild fish simply can’t reproduce as fast as 8 billion people can eat them. So we...



    August 11, 2017
    By Ayana Elizabeth Johnson and Jennifer Jacquet

    What’s the deal with overfishing? What’s at stake? And what can we do about it? We teamed up with the good folks at TEDEd on this animated short to explain.
    Punchline: Wild fish simply can’t reproduce as fast as 8 billion people can eat them. So we need better management of fishing. Our ecosystems, food security, jobs, economies, and coastal cultures all depend on it.
    If you want to dig into this topic further, a transcript of the voiceover is below, with hyperlinked citations. And, for teachers, there’s a companion lesson plan available on TED.com.
    Shoutouts to Dock to Dish, Greenwave, Blue Ventures, the Waitt Institute’s Blue Halo Initiative, Rare’s Fish Forever program, Monterey Bay Aquarium Seafood Watch, and University of British Columbia’s Sea Around Us Project, and many others for being part of the solution!
    ___________________________
    Fish are in trouble. The cod population off Canada’s east coast collapsed in the 1990s. Intense recreational and commercial fishing has decimated Goliath grouper populations in South Florida. And most populations of tuna have plummeted by over 50%, with the Southern Atlantic Bluefin on the verge of extinction. Those are just a couple of many examples. Overfishing is happening all over the world.
    How did this happen? When some people think of fishing, they imagine relaxing in a boat and patiently reeling in the day’s catch. But modern industrial fishing — the kind that stocks our grocery shelves — looks more like warfare. In fact, the technologies they employ were developed for war. Radar, sonar, helicopters, and spotter planes are all used to guide factory ships towards dwindling schools of fish. Longlines with hundreds of hooks or huge nets round up massive amounts of fish – along with other species like seabirds, turtles, and dolphins. And fish are hauled up onto giant boats, complete with on-board flash freezing and processing facilities.
    All of these technologies have enabled us to catch fish at greater depths and farther out at sea than ever before. And as the distance and depth of fishing have expanded, so has the variety of species we target. For example, the Patagonian toothfish neither sounds nor looks very appetizing, and fishermen ignored it until the late 1970s. Then it was rebranded and marketed to chefs in the US as Chilean seabass – despite the animal actually being a type of cod. Soon it was popping up in markets all over the world and is now a delicacy. Unfortunately, these deepwater fish don’t reproduce until they’re at least 10 years old, making them extremely vulnerable to overfishing when the young are caught before they’ve had a chance to spawn.
    Consumer tastes and prices can also have harmful effects. For example, shark fin soup is considered such a delicacy in China and Vietnam that the fin has become the most profitable part of the shark. This leads many fishermen to fill their boats with fins – leaving millions of dead sharks behind.
    The problems aren’t unique to toothfish and sharks. Almost 31% of the world’s fish populations are overfished, and another 58% are fished at the maximum sustainable level. Wild fish simply can’t reproduce as fast as 7 billion people can eat them.
    Fishing also has impacts on broader ecosystems. Wild shrimp are typically caught by dragging nets the size of a football field along the ocean bottom, disrupting or destroying seafloor habitats. The catch is often as little as 5% shrimp. The rest is bycatch – unwanted animals that are thrown back dead.
    And coastal shrimp farming isn’t much better. Mangroves are bulldozed to make room for shrimp farms, robbing coastal communities of storm protection and natural water filtration, and depriving fish of key nursery habitats.
    So what does it look like to give fish a break and let them recover? Protection can take many forms. In national waters, governments can set limits about how, when, where, and how much fishing occurs, with restrictions on certain boats and equipment. Harmful practices such as bottom trawling can be banned altogether. And we can establish marine reserves closed to all fishing, to help ecosystems restore themselves. There’s also a role for consumer awareness and boycotts to reduce wasteful practices like shark finning and push fishing industries towards more sustainable practices.
    Past interventions have successfully helped depleted fish populations recover. There are many solutions. The best approach for each fishery must be considered based on science, respect for the local communities that rely on the ocean, and for fish as wild animals. And then the rules must be enforced. International collaboration is often needed too, because fish don’t care about our borders.
    We need to end overfishing – ecosystems, food security, jobs, economies, and coastal cultures all depend on it.

    Dr. Ayana Elizabeth Johnson (@ayanaeliza) is a marine biologist, policy expert, conservation strategist, and Brooklyn native. She is founder of Ocean Collectiv, a strategy consulting firm for conservation solutions grounded in social justice. She teaches at New York University as an adjunct professor, and volunteered as co-director of partnerships for the March for Science.




    Jennifer Jacquet (@jenniferjacquet) is an assistant professor in environmental Studies at NYU. She is interested in large-scale cooperation dilemmas like climate change, and the exploitation of wild animals, including fishing and the Internet wildlife trade. She is particularly interested in the role of social approval in encouraging cooperation, and is the author of Is Shame Necessary? New Uses for an Old Tool (2015).

  3. #3
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    Default Re: Future of seafood

    "Humanity has wiped out 60% of mammals, birds, fish and reptiles since 1970, leading the world’s foremost experts to warn that the annihilation of wildlife is now an emergency that threatens civilisation."

    https://www.theguardian.com/environm...r-report-finds



  4. #4
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    Default Re: Future of seafood

    maybe i should pass on the yellowfin sashimi for lunch?
    Simpler is better, except when complicated looks really cool.

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    Default Re: Future of seafood

    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Pless View Post
    maybe i should pass on the yellowfin sashimi for lunch?
    It would do far more good to stop eating beef.

    Or is that inconceivable?


  6. #6
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    Default Re: Future of seafood

    Drip drip……. The tipping point is well past, wehave mined several billion years worth of the planet's resources and will suffer the same consequences that we have inflicted on other fellow residents of the planet.
    "May you live in interesting times" has never applied so directly.

  7. #7
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    Default Re: Future of seafood

    Beyond Burger is one of two companies making "fake" meat. Perhaps the Japanese will come up with fake fish. https://www.beyondmeat.com/products/the-beyond-burger/

    Environmental destruction comes to mind with fishing, as on land.

  8. #8
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    Default Re: Future of seafood

    Quote Originally Posted by skuthorp View Post
    ... The tipping point is well past...
    I have to agree. The world's fisheries resources will likely crash due to increased ocean acidification, resulting in the loss of the pelagic primary producers (plankton),
    along with ever increasing ocean temperatures. These effects are already locked in and will continue in spite of any effort by us to reverse the damage.

    But the real danger to those who like to feed themselves on a regular basis will be the loss of arable land and the end of abundance of staple crops, especially rice and corn.

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    Default Re: Future of seafood

    The bycatch thing is an issue that I think regulators need to urgently look at. In NZ, all species are caught under a quota management system, including recreational fishing. A commercial operator is required to throw back all bycatch that they don't hold quota for, even if it is dead. It just seems like a huge waste.

    Pete
    The Ignore feature, lowering blood pressure since 1862. Ahhhhhhh.

  10. #10
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    Default Re: Future of seafood

    We will just have to get beyond the stigma of eating humans, they are plentiful.

    I can't wait to see the marketing ploys

  11. #11
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    Default Re: Future of seafood

    So sad and depressing. What really pisses me off are the people (usually Republicans) who think all environmental concerns are just Liberal hogwash.

    The Hippies were right.

    Ralphie

  12. #12
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    Default Re: Future of seafood

    Their kids and grandkids will suffer the same situations as everyone elses. That's if they have grandkids, educated young people here are deciding they can't bring kids into the coming mess.

    But the I guess the word 'educated' is the difference.

  13. #13
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    Default Re: Future of seafood

    I am glad I never had kids.. a couple more decades on this planet (if I am lucky) and when I am gone, there are no direct offspring I will leave behind to suffer for our selfishness.

    As for fish, one only needs look at the mighty Chesapeake. The watermen have so over fished the oysters, the water is fetid mess compared to what it once was. That is the problem with fish, it's hard to tell how bad it is until the fish are actually gone. We can't see them stamped across the plains or fly across the sky to know if their numbers are dwindling
    "If you think you are too small to make a difference, try sleeping with a mosquito"

    -Dalai Lama

  14. #14
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    Default Re: Future of seafood

    Quote Originally Posted by Canoeyawl View Post
    We will just have to get beyond the stigma of eating humans, they are plentiful.

    I can't wait to see the marketing ploys
    Trump flavored *pork* sausages, fat, juicy and delicious. They're the greatest!

    Pete
    The Ignore feature, lowering blood pressure since 1862. Ahhhhhhh.

  15. #15
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    Default Re: Future of seafood

    Soylant Green is people
    "If you think you are too small to make a difference, try sleeping with a mosquito"

    -Dalai Lama

  16. #16
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    Default Re: Future of seafood

    I do therefore humbly offer it to publick consideration, that of the hundred and twenty thousand children, already computed, twenty thousand may be reserved for breed, whereof only one fourth part to be males; which is more than we allow to sheep, black cattle, or swine, and my reason is, that these children are seldom the fruits of marriage, a circumstance not much regarded by our savages, therefore, one male will be sufficient to serve four females. That the remaining hundred thousand may, at a year old, be offered in sale to the persons of quality and fortune, through the kingdom, always advising the mother to let them suck plentifully in the last month, so as to render them plump, and fat for a good table. A child will make two dishes at an entertainment for friends, and when the family dines alone, the fore or hind quarter will make a reasonable dish, and seasoned with a little pepper or salt, will be very good boiled on the fourth day, especially in winter.I have reckoned upon a medium, that a child just born will weigh 12 pounds, and in a solar year, if tolerably nursed, encreaseth to 28 pounds.I grant this food will be somewhat dear, and therefore very proper for landlords, who, as they have already devoured most of the parents, seem to have the best title to the children.Infant’s flesh will be in season throughout the year, but more plentiful in March, and a little before and after; for we are told by a grave author, an eminent French physician, that fish being a prolifick dyet, there are more children born in Roman Catholick countries about nine months after Lent, than at any other season; therefore, reckoning a year after Lent, the markets will be more glutted than usual, because the number of Popish infants, is at least three to one in this kingdom, and therefore it will have one other collateral advantage, by lessening the number of Papists among us.I have already computed the charge of nursing a beggar’s child (in which list I reckon all cottagers, labourers, and four-fifths of the farmers) to be about two shillings per annum, rags included; and I believe no gentleman would repine to give ten shillings for the carcass of a good fat child, which, as I have said, will make four dishes of excellent nutritive meat, when he hath only some particular friend, or his own family to dine with him. Thus the squire will learn to be a good landlord, and grow popular among his tenants, the mother will have eight shillings neat profit, and be fit for work till she produces another child.Those who are more thrifty (as I must confess the times require) may flay the carcass; the skin of which, artificially dressed, will make admirable gloves for ladies, and summer boots for fine gentlemen.

    https://www.gutenberg.org/files/1080/1080-h/1080-h.htm

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