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Thread: Campion Apple 16 Build

  1. #141
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    Default Re: Campion Apple 16 Build

    Having championed the use of those clamcleats on this forum for quite a few years,it gives me quite a lot of pleasure to see one ready for a long and useful life.

  2. #142
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    Default Re: Campion Apple 16 Build

    Rigged the boat entirely today, in the driveway.

    Step 1:

    Step 2:

    Step 3:

    Sails were made by the late Stuart Hopkins (Dabbler Sails). I'm sad that he never got to see them on the boat, but from what I can see so far, he did a great job on them (unsurprisingly). He also suggested making the mast about a foot taller than called out in the plans, which I'm glad I did -- while it does mean the mast doesn't fit inside the boat (it may have _just barely_), at the height I rigged it, an adult sitting on the forward floorboards _just_ clears under the boom; if I pulled the sail as high as it could be (another ~6-8"), it would be completely comfortable in the front there.

    For the rigging, I mostly followed Michael Storer's guidance (for the Goat Island Skiff, etc): lots of downhaul tension (6:1 on the main helps), a "preventer" line to keep the boom from riding forward, blocks attached to spars using loops of line. The only deviation was that I'm using parrel beed loops to keep the yards close to the masts, rather than the line strategy he advocates. I tried that on my previous little boat, and while it works great when the yard is at the top of the mast, when reefed, I'd prefer to be able to lower it down, and in that case, it doesn't seem to hold the yard close in the same way. I may replace those with the metal rings that people seem to use, but we'll see how this works for now.

    All of my "leathering" was done with white gaff tape: a suggestion that I really liked from Small Boats Monthly a while back. You can see it on the spars (I forgot to do it before bending the sails, so didn't do the ends of the boom / yards, which I should), and also, here's where the boomkin goes out of the boat (as well as my ~10ft paint job):



    One thing I already know is that the tiller extension I made is not long enough. It's usable, but only from the rear of the benches (without stretching), which is silly, as it could easily be a couple feet longer. Making another one will be pretty easy; the only reason I didn't in the first place is that the longer stock that I had (it's white oak) was still rough, whereas this piece was left over from an earlier project, almost the right size already:




    I'm hoping to put the boat in (quite protected) water soon to try it out. I have a dry suit, so as long as the weather is decent and the air temperature is nice enough, any day that I have a chance could work! (I had some time off this week, so may be able to squeeze it in; we'll see).
    Daniel

    Building a Campion Apple 16.

  3. #143
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    Default Re: Campion Apple 16 Build

    Well done on the long tiller extension.I've lost count of the number of otherwise nicely built built boats that don't have any form of tiller extension and this sadly spoils the launching pictures of the proud owner as he wafts along with the sheerline pointing at the treetops,rather than the horizon.For some of them I suspect it is because as first time builders they are totally in thrall to the plans and absolutely will not include any feature that isn't described in every detail.It may be that others are sailing novices as well as boatbuilding novices.Preventing the transom dragging is one of the most effective ways to get the boat to perform.

  4. #144
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    Default Re: Campion Apple 16 Build

    The first thing I did with my Hvalsoe 13 was build a tiller extension.
    Your boat is looking great!
    I was born on a wooden boat that I built myself.
    Skiing is the next best thing to having wings.

  5. #145
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    Default Re: Campion Apple 16 Build

    Thanks all!

    Well, I snagged a chance to drop the boat in the water:



    And, two things didn't work, which meant I had a nice row around and loaded the boat back on the trailer.

    First, and somewhat surprisingly, the handle end of the centerboard wasn't long enough, so when it pivoted back (i.e., down), rather than hitting up against the back end of the centercase slot, it could go underneath! I jury rigged a solution, jamming a coil of line halfway into the back of the slot, and then it worked fine (and sliding it in and pivoting worked perfectly, which I was still a little nervous about, as I hadn't been able to test the thickness after adding glass & paint). This was untestable off the water, as I have no way of hauling the boat high enough to pivot the board down fully, but still, quite surprising. I need to do some measuring to figure out what went wrong. I measured the board pretty carefully, so assuming the plans are right, I'm wondering if I made the log on top of the case slot slightly too short? (that was done long before the board existed, so I had no way of testing them off the boat). Either way, it's solvable -- mostly a matter of joining on another piece to the handle, which means I can do a nicer job of shaping where the shock cord goes through the board. I will need to check that the angle when down is correct, but that should be something I can figure out by careful measuring.

    The second, and easier to fix but more deal-breaker at the moment, my rudder downhaul didn't work at all! I was a little skeptical of the VB cord stretching, but that, combined with how the line was routed that added a bit of friction meant that I couldn't get enough leverage to counteract the bouyancy of the wood! Ironic that I used polyester covered spectra almost everywhere (that wasn't a sheet) on the boat (including places that I certainly didn't need to), but this was the place that I used this flimsy line. I'm going to replace it with something stronger and low stretch, and redo the line routing a bit, perhaps running the downhaul straight up the front of the rudder case (I thought running it through the slot and up the back would provide a better angle, but maybe that was a mistake, as the line was able to jam between the rudder and sides of the case).
    Daniel

    Building a Campion Apple 16.

  6. #146
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    Default Re: Campion Apple 16 Build

    I think you are on the right track with your amended rudder downhaul,the difference can be huge once you find a good low stretch rope.As far as the centreboard is concerned,take a good look at the plans to see what the designer intended.I have known a man get very agitated because the leading edge wasn't vertical when fully down,yet he hadn't sought to confirm that it need to be vertical but had a real fixation about it.If you do find it necessary to extend the handle portion,be very careful about it as the extension may foul things you hadn't thought of.At the top of the hand grip it can be useful to bolt on a couple of rubber door stops to limit the travel and to provide a gripping point.


  7. #147
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    Default Re: Campion Apple 16 Build

    Good work! Nice to see the rigging up and the boat out, its been great following your build.

    On my sailing canoe I went through a similar process with the rudder control lines. For the downhaul finally anded with an external line running down the inside face if the rudder, running the line as cleanly as I could. For attaching the line to the rudder blade I epoxied dyneema onto the front edge as a padeye. That way I could attached to it without having to go through it or screw to it. I believe I was turned onto the epoxy/deneema hardware idea by Tom Lantrop's tips. I like it a lot for the right situations.
    "Yeah, well, that's just, like your opinion man"
    -The Dude-

  8. #148
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    Default Re: Campion Apple 16 Build

    @Matt -- thanks for the kind words, and the idea! I think I'm going to keep trying to use the double uphaul hole that I drilled out (which I found it Oughtred's book), as it seems to be working, but the loop is a neat idea.

    @John -- careful study of the plans was, of course, necessary. They were not part of the official plans, but rather, some old sketches that the designer redrew in CAD when I asked about a centerboard (the plans specify a daggerboard, but with a long slot that allows multiple positions, so if you are happy with a single rig, as I am, the centerboard takes no more room and seems like an obvious improvement!). It seems that I made the log that closes off the top of the case 4cm too short. It's 62.5cm, it should be 66.5cm. I'm not sure how that happened, but it's quite obvious looking at it now -- even the slope starts forward of the slot:



    Doing some measurements on the board (and, remembering how it pivoted in the case), that essentially accounts for the difference -- my fix was to jam a coil of rope which filled about that space (it was not a large coil! So compressed being ~4cm seems about right), rather than pivoting through and down below the top of the case.

    I may still want to extend the pivot slightly: my attachment deviates slightly from the plans, in that I'm using shock cord running through a slot cut into the top of the board (held down by the two thumb cleats visible in the photo above). That wasn't part of the plans, and while the board would terminate, I'm worried shock cord may not have a solid connection without an inch or two extension. But, I'll probably fix the top of the case and test it out first.

    ----

    Unsurprisingly, fixing the rudder was a lot easier -- I realized one silly aspect of my lines were that I was running the uphaul to the same autorelease cam cleat, but clearly, when the rudder is up, it doesn't need to auto release! So I just installed a simple horn cleat for the uphaul to do to, and them moved the auto-release cleat to right on the front of the case, at the top (where it is above the transom):





    The uphaul has to route around the pins, but I don't think that'll be a big deal, and I can (loosely) make off the slack to the same horn cleat so that if I do run into something and it pops, I don't have to go fishing in the water for it.

    All this has to wait to be tested until it's next in the water, and I'm going to at least make a longer tiller extension before I do that (I have various other minor things, but may wait on them).
    Daniel

    Building a Campion Apple 16.

  9. #149
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    Default Re: Campion Apple 16 Build

    Haven't done much, but I did redo the rigging on the mast step. I like the line, but didn't love tying it around the pins -- requires two hands, which is awkward. I saw on here a design that Ross Lillistone suggested where there is a cleat behind the mast, and the line runs from an eye around the mast a few times and then cleated off. That seemed easier, so going to try it out:



    I also remade the tiller extension. The old one was 5ft, and measuring on the boat, 8ft seemed like a better length. Here's a photo with it, showing that from the mid thwart, sitting on the far side, pushing the tiller back should still be quite comfortable:



    I figured it I was going to remake it, I might as well do a nicer job than last time, so cut up a nice piece of cherry, rounded most of the length, and put 6 coats of deks olje on it. It looks (and feels) nice, and it's cherry, so should only get better with time:



    The main reason I wanted to post today, though, was that with that finishing, I hit exactly 400 hours on this project. Both the biggest project I've ever done, but also, not that much time given the boat that I have!

    For fun, here was 100hrs (Apr 2020):


    And 200hrs (Feb 2021):


    300hrs (Jun 2021):



    400hrs in, still think it's one of the best boats you can build, for your time.
    Daniel

    Building a Campion Apple 16.

  10. #150
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    Default Re: Campion Apple 16 Build

    Quote Originally Posted by dbp1 View Post
    Haven't done much, but I did redo the rigging on the mast step. I like the line, but didn't love tying it around the pins -- requires two hands, which is awkward. I saw on here a design that Ross Lillistone suggested where there is a cleat behind the mast, and the line runs from an eye around the mast a few times and then cleated off. That seemed easier, so going to try it out:

    That's the way I set up my mast partner and I have no complaints, although I just have one big cleat on the centerline the line is tied to. Two wraps around the mast and then back to the cleat.

    I've enjoyed seeing your progress. I really like the look of the Apple boats with that plumb stem and I might have gone for it instead of my First Mate if the website would have inspired confidence.

  11. #151
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    Default Re: Campion Apple 16 Build

    Quote Originally Posted by The Jeff View Post
    That's the way I set up my mast partner and I have no complaints, although I just have one big cleat on the centerline the line is tied to. Two wraps around the mast and then back to the cleat.

    I've enjoyed seeing your progress. I really like the look of the Apple boats with that plumb stem and I might have gone for it instead of my First Mate if the website would have inspired confidence.
    That website is pretty bad... which is really a bummer, as Tom draws beautiful boats! One goal of this thread is to try to make at least this design a little more visible... But your First Mate seems great (that design was a serious contender for me -- I just wanted something a bit bigger, for the length).

    In the meantime... I'm really glad I waited until finishing the whole boat to do the little bit of varnishing that I planned (this is just after the first coat, but the epoxy puts a pretty solid base for it):



    As I'm worried if I'd done that before painting, I would have been tempted to leave a lot more bright! I was assuming it would looks essentially the same as the epoxy had looked, but it looks quite a bit better. I'm using System 3's Marine Varnish, which seems like nice stuff, and is formulated to work over epoxy (and is probably particularly compatible with their epoxy, which is _mostly_ what I've used).

    I've gotten a second coat of varnish on (not sure yet how many coats I'll do), and installed the little plug in the rear of the centercase to make the slot the right size.
    Daniel

    Building a Campion Apple 16.

  12. #152
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    Default Re: Campion Apple 16 Build

    Well, it's a rainy day in the 40s, so definitely not varnishing weather, but I had a little time, so inspired by Bruce Bateau's thread http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthre...-Boat-Cruising, I made some sail/spar bags.

    But, I did things a little differently (and lazily). In particular, I want to minimize the setup / striking time for the rig (since, unlike Bruce, I expect mostly to be going out for a few hours and then coming home), and while it's quite simple (it's two unstayed balanced lug sails), it still takes time to thread the downhauls, run the mainsheet through the blocks back and forth, etc---any time I can eliminate, I want to.

    So I made the bags with the intention of leaving as much rigged as possible. Booms still attached to downhauls, main sheet still running through the 3:1 back and forth, etc. To do this, my bags don't zip, they are just open on one side, and are closed up with a series of bungees with plastic balls on the end. I may have to fine tune how many of them that I need (but they are cheap: I got a few bags of 25 for $10), but it seems like a decent system. I also made a tube for the front and back of the main mast (where it contacts the hull).

    Finally, since I wanted this to also serve as padding, rather than making them out of canvas or some waterproof sunbrella clone, I made them by cutting up and sewing together padded moving blankets. The boat will always be stored inside, and I'm not terribly worried about things getting wet in transit (I can always dry them out at some point), and it is nice and soft.

    Here's the view from the front; mast on the right (the back is propped up for varnishing, normally would be resting on the transom, in another bag), main sail on the left, with the 6:1 downhaul still rigged somewhat visible (not visible is the still rigged main sheet).



    The mizzen sail bag also has the mizzen mast and boomkin (and actually, the tiller extension would maybe fit in there; I should have checked!).

    I haven't quite figured out how they will be tied down to the boat. I'm not really worried about them bouncing out (especially since they are attached, at points), but probably a strap or two wouldn't be unwarranted.

    I still need to make bags for the oars, centerboard, and rudder in ruddercase, but overall I'm pretty happy how they turned out given it was quite quick to put together.
    Daniel

    Building a Campion Apple 16.

  13. #153
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    Default Re: Campion Apple 16 Build

    Well, I finally managed to get back on the water, and also, finally managed to sail.

    I had been looking for the closest ramp to my house (ironically, despite being a coastal city, I don't think Boston has a single public ramp, on the Charles or on the ocean; the state has a few, but none in particularly convenient places to me), and so ended up going to a little ramp about half an hour away that is on a slightly wider spot pretty far up the Charles. I checked it out the other day in my canoe, and it seemed like it'd work, and it did, though the other day it was vacant and today there were crew boats going by every couple minutes! I overheard one of the coaches saying to another that he'd never seen a boat like mine (presumably, the lug yawl sail).



    The rudder downhaul worked perfectly, and the boat handles very well; even in the almost no wind I was able to steer the boat surprisingly well (tacking back and forth going half a knot or less). Based on previous boats I've been in, that surprised me (I can remember getting through tacks sometimes tricky, sometimes gybing instead), and bodes well for the future. There were one or two puffs that moved the boat a bit faster (one got me going 3.5knots according to GPS), but I knew this wasn't a good place to sail -- I just had no way of testing the centerboard without putting the boat in the water.

    And the centerboard is still a problem! As you can see in the photo above, I reverted to my jam a coil of line in the back of the case solution, which works fine, but while the correction I made to the log on the top of the case means that the centerboard can not rotate back and underneath, it can go below the top of the case, which would be fine if it were handled with a line to a cleat behind the case (a pretty typical setup), but not helpful when I'm using shock cord to a little handle on the top. See:



    Another more minor annoyance that I probably will fix: I think I put the rudder case slightly too far down on the rudder post. I am going to check the plans again, but currently, even when fully up, the edge of the rudder is still in the water, which is annoying when rowing. I was already planning on slightly tweaking how the hardware was installed (and intentionally did not bed it in anything yet), so this will be an easy fix.

    But, a much more successful trial. I didn't have a ton of time, so after tacking around a bit, dropped the sail and rowed back (a comfortable 3 knots). Launching and retrieving a little faster than last time: ~30 minutes to launch, ~45 minutes to retrieve (someone stopped by to talk about the boat though). Still feels slow, but trying not to make mistakes.
    Daniel

    Building a Campion Apple 16.

  14. #154
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    Default Re: Campion Apple 16 Build

    Can you graft any extra material onto the centreboard to form a handle?Failing that,a hole through the top and a piece of 6mm rope with a plastic ball on the end might help.

  15. #155
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by John Meachen View Post
    Can you graft any extra material onto the centreboard to form a handle?Failing that,a hole through the top and a piece of 6mm rope with a plastic ball on the end might help.

    Grafting is my plan. It’s just painted wood near the top, and I did a somewhat sloppy job with the slot in the first place. I’m planning on cutting the end off, and then cutting strips down a few inches, to be matched by a new piece. I’ll make the new piece out of strips that match the width of what is cut out (uneven lengths), so they should slot in easily, and form a pretty strong bond (though this part of the board shouldn’t really feel any real force — as long as it doesn’t fall apart, it’d probably be fine).
    Daniel

    Building a Campion Apple 16.

  16. #156
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    Default Re: Campion Apple 16 Build

    Great to see her on the water!!!!

  17. #157
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    Default Re: Campion Apple 16 Build

    Quote Originally Posted by dalekidd View Post
    Great to see her on the water!!!!
    Thanks! Looking forward to seeing your CIY hit the water soon

    I forgot to mention -- I ended up putting 4 coats of varnish on the gunwales / transom. It's System 3 stuff, and going over System 3 Silvertip epoxy, and they say that over epoxy, 2-3 coats is probably enough (as opposed to countless when going over bare wood), so I figured 4 would be fine! It has a 24 hr recoat window, and based on when I had time / the sandpaper I had at the time, I did 220 after the first coat (which was too rough, and probably a mistake -- the instructions did say 400-600 grit, so I was warned), then 400 after the second coat, and nothing between the third and fourth coats.

    It's certainly no masterpiece, but it's actually probably _above_ the general standard of the rest of the boat (decidedly, "workboat", despite being intended for anything but!), so I'm pretty happy.

    Daniel

    Building a Campion Apple 16.

  18. #158
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    Default Re: Campion Apple 16 Build

    Halfway through fixing the centerboard. I made a handle that I _know_ will be long enough. I didn't bring a tape measure the last time I was on the water, so wasn't sure exactly how much longer to make it, but knew it needed to be a few inches at least. Cutting it _down_ if it's inconveniently long will be easy (though, being too long doesn't really matter, as long as it's not catching lines). I glued some strips together, cut the end of the existing handle, cut in slots, to get this as a rough dry fit:



    I tweaked it a little more and then glued it together:



    I'm still waiting for it to cure, then I'll sand it all flush, tune the shape, and paint it.

    In the meantime, something that had been annoying me was the anchor. I had gotten the smallest galvavized Mantus anchor (8lb), and got a canvas bucket to put it in, but it doesn't fit because the canvas bucket has a solid ring around the top that is too small. So the anchor just kind of half poked out, and the canvas wasn't really protecting the boat from the anchor, and it's still a pain to strap down. Maybe the Mantus was a mistake, but I'm not replacing it for now, so I decided to build something more custom. There's a space right between the front of the centercase and the mast step that seems perfect, and it's a good place for the weight:


    The picture above shows the cardboard mockup: the idea is to have an open topped box that slips in, and then there will be a toggle on the aft edge of the mast step that'll hold the whole box down. I'll have a piece of wood to go over the lines as an almost lid (but it'll be loose) and then the anchor will be strapped with bungees to the box (so everything will be securely held in place). That way, the whole assembly can be removed for trailering, and if the bungees are removed, the anchor can be used without removing the box.

    I cut out plywood, taped it together, and filleted the inside edges. I'm going to glass the bottom (and outstide corners, after rounding) to strengthen it a bit, and then drill some big drainage holes.



    Finally, I started experimenting with the name. This is just pieces of white gaff tape, but helps to give a sense of the size and placement for when I do it for real in paint. For the name: I wanted something playful and my son loves cats, but primarily, it comes from a wonderful childrens book about the apocryphal story about a fisherman and his cat in Mousehole (Cornwall). In the picture book, all the boats are lug yawls, and the cat is named Mouser.

    Daniel

    Building a Campion Apple 16.

  19. #159
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    Default Re: Campion Apple 16 Build

    Well I think someone up there wants me to buy some fancy rudder hardware, so anyway!

    I took the boat to a public boat ramp on the ocean today, to give it a little more space to test. It was a light air day, which I knew, and was all going pretty well:



    I found a bit more wind, got going a bit faster, and then the rudder stopped working! After a few seconds, I realized that both the pin had bent, and one of the eye screw in the rudder post had bent, meaning the rudder wasn't remotely being properly controlled by the tiller anymore. Because it was bent, I couldn't actually get it _off_ on the water, but I pulled it up (and it _still_ is too low, so actually partly pulled it off and lashed it so it wouldn't touch the water). This was all rather easy to do because of the mizzen -- I just sheeted it hard and gradually drifted downwind as I did this, dropped the main sail, and then rowed back to the ramp.

    IMG_1799.jpg

    It's hard to tell that not only is the eye screw bent, but the pin is as well! I would have thought this 6mm/8mm stainless would be pretty tough, but I guess there's a lot of force on the rudder. I had to unscrew the eye screw to detach the rudder from the boat, which I did after getting back.

    So, lesson learned: don't try to cheap out on rudder hardware. I'm now just ordering the right stuff, called out in the plans.

    I also tested out the anchor box, which I still have to paint (waiting until the epoxy is totally cured). It seems to work well, though I didn't _use_ the anchor.
    IMG_1783.jpg
    Daniel

    Building a Campion Apple 16.

  20. #160
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    Default Re: Campion Apple 16 Build

    I'm trying my best to build as economically as possible. I put a lot of my hardware on a Christmas/birthday wish list. LOL. I got just about all of it! I really didn't want to skimp on my rudder hardware - got the midsize pintle/gudgeon set from Duckworks. Should hold up. Enjoying seeing your boat on the water. Here's to getting all the bugs ironed out!

  21. #161
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    Default Re: Campion Apple 16 Build

    Quote Originally Posted by dalekidd View Post
    I'm trying my best to build as economically as possible. I put a lot of my hardware on a Christmas/birthday wish list. LOL. I got just about all of it! I really didn't want to skimp on my rudder hardware - got the midsize pintle/gudgeon set from Duckworks. Should hold up. Enjoying seeing your boat on the water. Here's to getting all the bugs ironed out!
    The stuff duckworks has is good -- I used it on the previous boat, and _tried_ to use it on this one, but they are indefinitely out of stock on the hardware that is wide enough (I need 2 1/8th, really 2 1/2 is better). I was missing a cam cleat (for the mizzen sheet) when I took the boat out the first time, and got one on amazon (duckworks ships incredibly quickly, but they are on the other side of the country!): more expensive than what duckworks has, and total crap. I was a little suspicious of it, so I hadn't bedded it in anything, and it's now in the bin.

    I was also suspicious of this rudder hardware, hence having the eye screws just into bare wood (no bedding), as I thought there would be a chance I might change things: turns out, I was right! Those holes will all be getting filled in.
    Daniel

    Building a Campion Apple 16.

  22. #162
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    Default Re: Campion Apple 16 Build

    Well, no update for over a month, mostly because it took over a month to get the rudder hardware that I ordered from Classic Marine. They said they were having supply issues with their foundry -- I hadn't realized that despite having an online catalog, the items you purchase aren't actually stocked (or maybe they can be, but weren't for me!), but are made on demand. But, they finally showed up, and look quite solid. One of the pins is a bit oversize, so I'll need to sand it down so it fits & rotates smoothly, but otherwise, they look great.

    In the meantime, while I was waiting, I ended up finally going ahead and making the Apple Motor Boat. I had vaguely thought it might be something for the future, but after going to a couple of the ramps around here, and scoping out more on charts/online, I realized that most (all?) require a bit of a trip to get out to open water, and while I have oars and can row, having another option would be a nice thing. So, in another thread, I got an idea for an easy to fabricate mount that adds a 10 degree negative rake to the transom, meaning it's only at 20 degrees effective from the water, and that is one of the trim adjustments on the electric outboard that I got.

    Here's what it looked like, in progress, which shows all of the parts: I just planed a 10 degree angle in a single long piece of wood, then cut it in half and glued it together with a plywood cap. If I were doing it again, I would add more spacers between the transom and the pieces while gluing it up (I just used plastic to prevent it from gluing on, but that left a _tight_ fit), and might replace the plywood at the top with just several layers of fiberglass -- there isn't a ton of extra vertical distance in the clamps for the motor, and once it is clamped, that top piece doesn't need to have any strength.



    Here I was testing the blocks, before gluing them together, confirming that they did, indeed, get the motor vertical!



    And, I can confirm, it works! At low throttle (100-200 watts), it pushes the boat 3-4knots, which is about all that I wanted/expected from it. And, that means the motor is a bit overpowered, which is nice, as it should mean that even in windier, wavier, conditions it should still be able to make progress, but if I do want to use it just as a low-speed electric motor boat, it'll run all day at this speed with just the built in battery.

    So, pretty happy with the experiment thus far.

    Once the rudder hardware came in, I could start working on it. It is slightly too narrow, but I knew that, as letting it into the rudder case and rudder post is doable (and maybe preferable). The rudder case was pretty close, so I only wanted to cut in maybe 1/16". I marked lines on both sides with clamped pieces of wood, which sort of worked to get parallel lines:



    And then cut it out with a circular saw set at 1/16", repeatedly cutting inside the lines (I marked them with tape, so I could see while cutting). A chisel finished it up, and it fits pretty nicely. The hardware is going to be set in with epoxy, so a little gap is intended, though the side visible in the photo below is because my "parallel" lines weren't quite parallel, so I had to widen the slot slightly. This piece will have the hole for the bolt going through as the pivot for the rudder (that obviously won't be glued in!):



    Then I started working on the corrosponding pintle, which lives at the bottom of the rudder post. I wanted to do the bottom pair first so I would get the height right (the height being set so that the rudder case is as low as possible while being totally out of the water with the rudder hauled up).

    Here, I again marked parallel lines, but given the spacing, could not use the circular saw. Instead, I used a trim router (which was my original intent for the rudder case, but I couldn't get the bit out the other day; today, given no alternative, WD40 and a bit of encouragement finally got it loose!), again set at the right depth. That only worked so far, as the router started bumping into the hull, so I cut the last bit using a oscilating multitool and then cleared out with a chisel. The plunge cut (at an odd angle) of the multitool worked perfectly for this; obviously getting the depth right is tricky, as it is completely free hand, but since I didn't have to do much I could match the depth of the routed out part pretty well. Here's before chiseling the remainder out (and widening the top of the slot, oops!).




    I have a bit more of this to do before I can dry fit everything, and then I need to drill holes in the hardware before I can come back and get them properly dry fit.
    Daniel

    Building a Campion Apple 16.

  23. #163
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    Default Re: Campion Apple 16 Build

    That hardware looks fantastic! Just something about brass and wooden boats.

  24. #164
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    Jul 2018
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    Default Re: Campion Apple 16 Build

    Quote Originally Posted by dalekidd View Post
    That hardware looks fantastic! Just something about brass and wooden boats.

    IMG_2187.jpg

    Sure is pretty. Pricey, but at least it's well made, and should outlast the boat.
    Daniel

    Building a Campion Apple 16.

  25. #165
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    Jul 2018
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    Default Re: Campion Apple 16 Build

    Well, a bit of a saga with the rudder hardware.

    I finished letting in the hardware pretty quickly, and then spent a little while figuring out how to drill out bolt holes on the strap pieces (which came without holes). I'm a complete novice in dealing with metal, but managed to get it to work eventually without injury or destruction of any pieces -- I went up in 1/16" increments on the bits, and cut dados in pieces of plywood to hold the straps stable while drilling:


    Then came the actual problem. While I could eyeball the hardware being straight, it obviously was slight off as while I could get the rudder case on (while it was just clamped in place), it would somewhat bind when turning. So I asked on this forum, on another thread, and John / Nick suggested getting tube/rod stock that would fit through the hardware and align it -- simple, and worked perfectly. Here's it on the transom (the reverse worked on the rudder case):



    I glued it in place and then removed the metal. Drilling all the holes was easy, with the exception of the countersinks for the upper transom fitting, as they went into the 30 degree raked transom. But I cut a hole for the bit in a scrap of construction lumber and then ripped that in half at 30 degrees; it then clamped on either side and guided the bit in. It still was a bit slippery (probably if I put something non-skid in between, would have been better), but worked well enough.



    And now all the hardware is in, and just needs a little cleanup and some paint touchup (I've since cut off the over-long bolts, and shortened the upper pin):

    Daniel

    Building a Campion Apple 16.

  26. #166
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    Jul 2018
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    Default Re: Campion Apple 16 Build

    In the meantime, there was another project that I'd been working on....

    When I last had the boat on the water, something still was bothering me about the centerboard. While I had fixed the case top so that it didn't rotate back into the case, I noticed when I was pulling the boat out that the board protruded out the bottom of the boat even when fully up -- which means, among other things, I couldn't leave it in while trailering (something that would be convenient! There is a carpeted beam down the centerline, so the centerboard certainly won't fall out!). It wasn't coming out by a lot, maybe an inch or so, but it, combined with the rest of the trouble with the centerboard fit was bothering me.

    I remeasured the board and didn't see anything obvious, and measured a few spots of the inside of the case -- all the dimensions lined up as they should have. The only thing I could think of was that the log at the top of the centercase was too thick, or that instead there should have been a cap on top (that would have accounted for ~50mm of height in the case). Regardless, with the top of the case on, there is no way to fit the board in when the boat is on the trailer, so it seemed that the easiest way to figure out the answers would be to remove the top.

    So, I grabbed a circular saw and a chisel, and removed that stringer:



    (I actually ended up going quite a bit further, but that was the best in-progress photo).

    Once I did that, I measured and remeasured, and put the board in, and while adjusting the top to a cap won't making things perfect, it will certainly allow the board to fit inside the case, which is the main thing I want.



    I talked with the designer, and both he and I are pretty convinced that the case is more-or-less the right dimension, though with perhaps a bit thick top stringer, which must mean my board is off! So I went back and remeasured it again, and I realized that I did the taper wrong. The board is wider where it leaves the hull than at the tip, and I used the trailing edge as a baseline, rather than the leading edge, which has a subtle change in various angles of the board and probably is the root cause.

    Regardless, I don't think it'll have much of a performance difference in the water -- it slightly changes the shape of the tip, but the angle between the leading and trailing edge are exactly what they should be.

    And, so I built back up a cap for the centercase out of two layers of 6mm plywood:



    And decided I might as well varnish it, if I was going to have it be its own little piece. Plus, since I already knew the hardware that would be permanently affixed, I was able to bolt the main sheet attachments before gluing the whole thing down, which I'm much happier with than screwing!




    So certainly not ideal, but it turned out pretty well. Now I just have to get the thing back in the water.
    Daniel

    Building a Campion Apple 16.

  27. #167
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    Jul 2018
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    Boston, MA
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    Default Re: Campion Apple 16 Build

    Had a moment and took the boat to a local state park (which just recently reopened its boat ramp, after being closed for a while).

    Very little wind, so not a _great_ test, but the new rudder hardware worked well, as well as the fixed centerboard cap (the centerboard is it the boat, on the trailer now).

    https://www.youtube.com/shorts/v1O7OXjoiuI

    A few more tweaks for next time -- I'm going to shorten the tiller extension by a bit; currently it's long enough that getting it out of the way on tacks is a bit annoying (and that is sitting right at the center of the boat). And I realized I never re-installed the auto-release cam cleat for the downhaul on the rudder, so I should do that (I just used the normal cleat, which is for the uphaul).
    Daniel

    Building a Campion Apple 16.

  28. #168
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    Jul 2018
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    Default Re: Campion Apple 16 Build

    Yesterday, I did another sea trial, this time launching down at a ramp that's just off of a north part of Narraganset Bay (in Swansea, MA). It's about an hour drive, so I wasn't going to check out the ramp first, and I doubt I'll go back -- while it was pretty quiet, which was part of why I picked that ramp, vs something further south (plus, the closest access to that water to me), the ramp is around the corner from the bay, and that corner has a bit of current, made quite a bit more exciting when the tide is going out (which it was the whole time I was there). Rowing back in, I relied upon having the rudder a bit down and using that to keep my off the rocks on either side (I had made the arm of the push pull tiller long enough that the tiller lies along the gunwale, so it can be bungeed to a cleat on the stern corner -- that way, it'll hold a position, but if I shove it, I can adjust it -- which works quite will while rowing), as the current was a bit squirrelly and was pushing me from side to side. Since everyone loves pictures, here's a map / track. The beginning / end was rowing, the middle (the southern half) sailing.

    IMG_2704.jpg

    I didn't have much time, so it was a short trip, but at least there was a little wind for some of it (when the wind did come, I was going 4 to 5 knots). I have 80lbs of removable painted lead bars trapped beneath the floorboards, and while I'm sure they help, the boat heels right over in a puff. The designer did specify more like 160 - 275lbs of ballast if I wanted it to not act like a planing dinghy, so I guess that should be expected! I'm not sure if I should add more ballast, reef the sail, or just admit that, when sailing, the boat is going to be for people who like sailing!

    The shortened tiller worked (not in the way when tacking as before), though I'm still getting used to the push-pull. I have a lot of muscle memory from sailing dingies as a little kid, and that isn't helpful here!

    I've also been working on a better motor mount (that gets things vertical, which should mean the motor can be kicked up out of the water without removing it), but to use it while sailing I need a longer mizzen mast, so did not take it with me. It would have been nice at this launch though! I'm thinking of repurposing the main mast for the puddle duck racer (since chopped up) for this, assuming it fits. Here's a photo of that, in progress:

    Daniel

    Building a Campion Apple 16.

  29. #169
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    Sep 2020
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    Aberdeenshire, UK
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    59

    Default Re: Campion Apple 16 Build

    Hi Daniel,

    What electric outboard motor do you have there, if you don't mind me asking. It's also interesting that you've ended up with the Classic Marine bronze rudder hinges, since they're the only off-the-shelf items I can find online which fit round the 2.5inch / 64mm wide rudder headstock. The price though - eek!

  30. #170
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    Jul 2018
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by jamieduff1981 View Post
    Hi Daniel,

    What electric outboard motor do you have there, if you don't mind me asking. It's also interesting that you've ended up with the Classic Marine bronze rudder hinges, since they're the only off-the-shelf items I can find online which fit round the 2.5inch / 64mm wide rudder headstock. The price though - eek!

    Yeah, the prices are ridiculous. But the only other options seem to be:

    1. Get a machinist to fabricate something of aluminum or stainless (or maybe galvanize regular steel)
    2. Build something out of fiberglass (this was Bruce aka wizbangs suggestion — and perhaps if I had thought of it initially, a good one), probably using stock G10 tubing to pivot on.

    The outboard I have is the EPropulsion Spirit. I’ve only tested it on a river without much current, and it seemed overpowered, at least if all you want to do is go at
    I wanted to get the smaller EP Carry (from a smaller company) but they were out of stock and repeated messages to the company never gave any info as to when that might change…
    Daniel

    Building a Campion Apple 16.

  31. #171
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    Jul 2018
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    Default Re: Campion Apple 16 Build

    Well, it's been a while, but I finally got around to finishing / painting the motor bracket, and tomorrow I will be testing it (been a busy month and haven't been able to get on the water). Here's the rest of the construction photos (before and after the photo above):





    Daniel

    Building a Campion Apple 16.

  32. #172
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    Jul 2018
    Location
    Boston, MA
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    379

    Default Re: Campion Apple 16 Build

    Last weekend, took the boat out with a bunch of people (rotating through sitting on shore and taking rides). There was not much wind, so also tested out the motor some (though the Apple will move along even in just a ghost of wind, so didn't need to do that much, aside from when my toddler was asking for it).

    A few photos:







    And, I finally put the name on:



    Which is a reference to this children's book: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Mousehole_Cat
    Daniel

    Building a Campion Apple 16.

  33. #173
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    Apr 2009
    Location
    Mountain lakes of Vermont
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    17,984

    Default Re: Campion Apple 16 Build

    Are you satisfied with the motor? I'm always curious about the various ones on the market.
    I was born on a wooden boat that I built myself.
    Skiing is the next best thing to having wings.

  34. #174
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    Jul 2018
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    Default Re: Campion Apple 16 Build

    Quote Originally Posted by Rich Jones View Post
    Are you satisfied with the motor? I'm always curious about the various ones on the market.
    So far, yeah. It definitely feels like a bit more than I need (I have only ever used it at or below half throttle) --- if it had seemed that the much smaller EP Carry was ever going to get back in stock (I emailed them several times, and they answered questions _other_ than when it'd be available again, but never responded to that...), I may have waited, but having the extra power feels like a nice safety margin in case I'm trying to use it in strong currents, etc.

    And at that low throttle, the built in battery should last half a day of constant motoring, if not more, which seems like plenty!

    I also like that they made it use a standard 48V battery and have an adaptor to plug into any external battery (theirs, or anyone elses), if I did want to use it in something more dedicated to motoring.
    Daniel

    Building a Campion Apple 16.

  35. #175
    Join Date
    Sep 2020
    Location
    Aberdeenshire, UK
    Posts
    59

    Default Re: Campion Apple 16 Build

    The boat looks great out on the water. How much ballast are you carrying in those photographs? Just trying to get an idea of freeboard with passengers aboard...

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