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Thread: An Off the Grid Calendar Islands Yawl Build

  1. #176
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    Default Re: An Off the Grid Calendar Islands Yawl Build

    Looks good! I like the bench dogs.
    Clinton B. Chase
    Portland, Maine

    http://tinyurl.com/myboats

  2. #177
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    Default Re: An Off the Grid Calendar Islands Yawl Build

    OK, round 3 trying to get a post accepted. I don't know what's wrong but my posts are not being published and I'm losing my work!

    The bench "dog" idea was a complete ripoff from another thread here .. Which I'm shamelessly doing every chance I get

    I realized just now that my terrible documentation skills are showing, I forgot to capture a picture of the finished sternpost attachment to the transom. The last pic in this post shows at least part of it.

    The bottom went on flawlessly. Simple to align and easy to glue up.



    Then on to garboards. The port garboard is stitched and glued, the stbd garboard is just clamped awaiting final fit, stitch and glue. Garboards fit well, just some minor planing on the bow end was required.




    Here's a stern pic showing the silicon bronze screws (to be epoxy filled later) that attach the sternpost cleats to the transom.



    This was my first experience with Gel Magic - and I'm hooked! That stuff makes glue up so easy and with far less mess and cleanup than I had anticipated.

    I'm also going to get ahead gluing up and epoxy coating the remaining planks in preparation for the remainder of the hull construction while I finish up the bottom tasks (fiberglass tape, fiberglass, and skeg installation).
    I swear I'm half done.

  3. #178
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    Default Re: An Off the Grid Calendar Islands Yawl Build

    Houston, we have a problem. It was a chain of events that I thought would have a happy ending. I'm ending up with something where I have no idea what the best way to correct the problem(s) are.

    The last fiberglass work I had done was in the early 80s, building a whitewater kayak with E-glass, nylon, and polyester resin. At the time a good, solid budget - but old school - way of building. I thought I had retained those skills - but apparently not.

    It started with taping the seams. No, I wasn't drinking - but the do wander a bit more than I would have liked. The epoxy was starting to cure pretty fast on that warm day so I was moving fast. I was encouraged with the thought that when the cloth covers the entire bottom that less than stellar job would disappear. So I lightly sanded the fiberglass tape, taking care to ensure I didn't damage the fibers (my first mistake), then laid down the cloth, with this result:



    As you can see - visible seams. Hmmm. AHA! Fairing compound. So I faired around the seams and after some sanding had a nice result. So one more coat of epoxy and ready to move on, right? ... Not so fast...





    The epoxy was laid on a very hot day (95 degrees F) and even though I was in a basement shop that's about 10 degrees cooler, the epoxy set up quite fast and looks "streaky". So what do I do? Sand it off and try again? Could it possibly have been caused by amine blush from the fairing compound? (I did not water wash, thinking the fairing compound was like the System 3 silvertip and doesn't blush)

    By the way, I'm no better at fairing than taping. Sigh. Well at least I have the luxury of time to fix this. I'm going to start the lapstrake planking and address this over time as the planks go on. Will be calling Clint next week to get his advice as well - but anyone with some thoughts on best ways to fix my mess (hopefully without sanding to plywood!) appreciated.
    Last edited by Pete Bergquist; 06-21-2020 at 06:57 AM.
    I swear I'm half done.

  4. #179
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    Default Re: An Off the Grid Calendar Islands Yawl Build

    You have two things going for you here, Pete: the fiberglass is structurally sound, and the fish aren't that critical.

    I don't think those seams are going to be any particular problem for you. Stitch and glue seams can "wander" a bit and make for some odd humps and dips to be addressed after the fiberglass is laid. I've found that it's most effective to address them then the hull is completed so that you can fair everything together. I think you'll find that after the planking is finished and the fillets at the plank edges are done that there won't be that much fairing to smooth out what you have.

    From what I'm seeing in the photos your worst case scenario is that you'll use a bit more epoxy and thus add a negligible amount of weight to the bottom of your boat.

    Good luck,

    Mike
    "You may be orange, you may like hamburgers, and you may be a clown, but you sir are no Ronald McDonald" - John Stewart

  5. #180
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    Default Re: An Off the Grid Calendar Islands Yawl Build

    I can't be of much help with your questions because I just taped my first seam last week. My results seem to wander a bit more than yours do. But your post raises a couple questions:

    1) Have you added additional coats of epoxy to fill the seams? I don't know if that will help make the seams less visible but I wonder if it would. I still have to add coats to my one seam that I have completed so I will see what it does.

    2) Are you going to paint the hull? If so, you will have the opportunity to fair the seams before you put the paint on.

    I found my seam certainly was visible. I still have to add another coat of epoxy or two to fill the weave. Once I have that done I intend to fair the seams with thickened epoxy to try to make them less visible. I have tried to fair one joint in the boat with thickened epoxy, prior to taping, and I find I am not very good at it. Again, I have no experience as I am a first timer with my build, but that is the plan that I have for moving forward. I will be painting my hull after all seams are taped and faired.

  6. #181
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    Default Re: An Off the Grid Calendar Islands Yawl Build

    Thank you Mike, that's good to hear.

    Berniebac, after my seams were taped I added a layer of fiberglass. what I should have done is do a better job of sanding the seams to taper them to the bottom edge before that next layer of glass. I could see the tape seams clearly through the glass, but as Mike said, there are easy ways to address that later... which I plan to do.

    I do plan to paint the hull, with the exception of the sheer plank, which will be sapele.

    I've got 2 more planks installed, (pics later) and working to fit the 3rd. My brain told me to plan for a plank a day until done, but with rookie learning curve, miscues and re-dos, I'm not moving that fast. all- in - all making good steady progress though.

    Epoxy cleanup after gluing a plank is not my favorite task!
    I swear I'm half done.

  7. #182
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    Default Re: An Off the Grid Calendar Islands Yawl Build

    Quote Originally Posted by Pete Bergquist View Post
    Thank you Mike, that's good to hear.

    Berniebac, after my seams were taped I added a layer of fiberglass. what I should have done is do a better job of sanding the seams to taper them to the bottom edge before that next layer of glass. I could see the tape seams clearly through the glass, but as Mike said, there are easy ways to address that later... which I plan to do.

    I do plan to paint the hull, with the exception of the sheer plank, which will be sapele.

    I've got 2 more planks installed, (pics later) and working to fit the 3rd. My brain told me to plan for a plank a day until done, but with rookie learning curve, miscues and re-dos, I'm not moving that fast. all- in - all making good steady progress though.

    Epoxy cleanup after gluing a plank is not my favorite task!

    Pete,

    Thanks for the additional explanation. That will help me when I get to glassing the bottom of my boat as I plan to tape the seams then glass the bottom. So the process is to feather the edges of the taped seams before adding the layer of glass over the entire bottom. Should be easy if I could only find time to work on the boat.

  8. #183
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    Default Re: An Off the Grid Calendar Islands Yawl Build

    I read a quote from John Welsford the other day, that said something to the effect of "When a first time boat builder completes his first boat, they will have learned all of the skills they wish they had when they started"...

    Wow, that sure speaks to me at this point!

    I'm currently on hold, awaiting supplies from Amazon (which has completely disappointed me in the Prime Delivery front lately), and have been doing some project review and analysis. Unfortunately (?) my critical eye is getting better and I can see the areas where I could have done better. But I'm not going to let it bother me. I know it's my first project and each day I'm learning what to look for. (My wife's going to kill me, but...) This will help out a lot when I build my next boat.

    Before my pause, here's how far I have progressed:

    Plank 4 is fit on the STBD side, and once I cut the gains on the port side, it will be ready to glue up as well. The main thing I'm waiting for is empty caulk tubes for the GelMagic. The tubes I have been using don't release the dried epoxy like others have reported, so my tubes have been once and done items. It turned out to be a 2 week delivery item from Amazon, so thus the delay.



    I also was able to attach the skeg. It was filleted after this picture was taken. The skeg lamination had a little curve to it (my wife called it the "Clinton Curve"), which we were able to straighten during the fitting process.



    ... and after the fillet



    Hopefully I will get my tubes delivered to the Post Office today so I can continue with progress. I head down to Clint's shop later this week to pick up the parts for masts, yard, boom, boomkin, and a few other components. It's a 3 hour trip each way, but will save a lot of hassle trying to figure out how to get something shipped up here and actually receive it in a reasonable amount of time.

    I'm beginning to wonder, with all of the little hiccups and delays, whether I'll actually get to sail her before the end of the season. It's going to be tight, but an after Labor Day launch is still my goal. Fortunately almost all interior components are epoxy finished and will be ready for prime and paint following installation - so as long as there aren't too many time consuming stops I have a chance of making it. I won't be rushing though! If it isn't ready it isn't ready and next year will come soon enough.
    Last edited by Pete Bergquist; 07-06-2020 at 07:24 AM.
    I swear I'm half done.

  9. #184
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    Default Re: An Off the Grid Calendar Islands Yawl Build

    My love of GelMagic has faded a bit. The lady has a dark side that reared it's ugly head 2 days ago.

    But first... The Whiskey Plank is set!





    But setting the last plank was not without its drama. I used my typical process of mixing 2 batches of Gel Magic and spreading them out until I could fill the caulk tube. Then, spreading quickly on the plank and on the boat bulkheads because once in the tube it quickly gets hot and curing starts happening fast (but we all know that). However on this day, things went thermonuclear on me about 3/4 of the way through spreading the mixture. The tube plugged and was burning hot to the touch, so I cut a hole in the tube and scooped out what I could to finish the job. It ended well, but my life might be a few months shorter now. Sheesh!

    The odd thing, is that the weather was decently cool, about 70F, but the humidity was a little higher than normal - but not crazy high. I had used GM on hotter days with no issues - up to 82F or so.

    Some good friends, the spousal unit and I shared a glass of Whistlepig Rye Whiskey last evening, and now on to the finishing steps required before applying epoxy, primer and paint.

    She's A BOAT!
    I swear I'm half done.

  10. #185
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    Default Re: An Off the Grid Calendar Islands Yawl Build

    My last post was about 10 days ago, as I have been prepping to apply the primer coats. I will be using the 2 part System 3 Epoxy/Polyamide primer.

    I was unable to use the stem I had fabricated at home from solid sapele. It was a beautiful thing, but it was only 3/4" wide. I had followed Larchmont Jim's build and noted his stem was just that wide, and instead of closely following Clint's manual, I just blindly plodded along assuming I'd have a 3/4" width to work with. Um, no go. Jim did some clever finagling with plank lengths and epoxy fill to reduce the width to 3/4". My width is more like 1-1/8" at the sheer reducing to about 3/4" at the end of the stem. So I used Clint's ash laminates to create and shape a new stem that I could tailor to those dimensions.



    I cleaned up the drudge and smoothed the transom, which had taken a bit of a hit during construction. I had naively thought I could protect it with a little tape - that didn't work out to be an effective idea by any stretch of the imagination. She's back to respectible now.



    Then on to final fairing, and epoxy coating.



    Quite a bit of fairing compound (and just a bit more required on the bottom in this pic), which I attribute completely to rookie boatbuilding. The fishes might sneer, but plank 3 and above turned out quite fair and I'm very happy with the results so far. My overconfident self thought I could build this and not require any fairing... I'm humbled now
    I swear I'm half done.

  11. #186
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    Default Re: An Off the Grid Calendar Islands Yawl Build

    Quote Originally Posted by Pete Bergquist View Post

    Quite a bit of fairing compound (and just a bit more required on the bottom in this pic), which I attribute completely to rookie boatbuilding.
    My first boat was made of Fairing Compound
    Clinton B. Chase
    Portland, Maine

    http://tinyurl.com/myboats

  12. #187
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    Default Re: An Off the Grid Calendar Islands Yawl Build

    The beautiful lines of the boat are not hurt by a little fairing compound. Great work.

  13. #188
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    Default

    I go away for a month and this is what I come back to?? Looks great you're doing a great job what's a little fairing compounds between friends?

    Nice design Clinton!
    Denise, Bristol PA, Oday30, Anchor Yacht Club, On tidal Delaware River. my current project; http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthre...0-Ducker-Resto

  14. #189
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    Default Re: An Off the Grid Calendar Islands Yawl Build

    I've been busy enough over the past week or so to not have time to post. A couple of smiles here with your replies!

    So I moved along and was able to apply 3 coats of System 3 2 part primer, with just a touch more fairing compound to round out a few spots.





    There were a few very humid days sprinkled in. I decided to avoid applying any coatings on those days, as the primer instructions were littered with warnings about bad things when the humidity was high. But after 4 days it was complete, with one marathon day where I applied 2 coats.

    A few days to let things cure a bit and then on to exterior finish. I'm using Pettit Ocean Blue topside paint, and I am in love with the color after the first coat.



    After the first coat I had a couple of days with some other things to do, and now Isaias is heading up this way.... The soon-to-be former Tropical Storm will just be some wind and rain (and high humidity, again) until later this week, so further work on the hull is on hold.

    Which gave me an opportunity to head to Lowe's yesterday for some much needed foam brush replentishment. I have found that Home Depot's foam brushes are far too floppy and soft for tipping, but the Lowes version (at least here in downeast Maine) is much nicer and stiffer and does a better job. As a side effect of the Lowes trip, the spousal unit went off window shopping elsewhere in the store. This led me to the tool section (of course!), where I found this:



    Oh My Goodness! A LiIon battery powered heat gun. My current heat gun just tears up the solar system capacity here ("Off the grid", remember?), and I have been having nightmares about boat turnover day and the subsequent copious heat gun needs. But now, I have a manageable solution to that problem. I have a couple of 6Ah batteries, which I anticipate will give me a good 4 minutes of use each before needing recharge (it still is a heat gun, after all), but that is far better than the potential battery damage to the solar system. YAY!
    Last edited by Pete Bergquist; 08-04-2020 at 07:25 AM.
    I swear I'm half done.

  15. #190
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    Default Re: An Off the Grid Calendar Islands Yawl Build

    Wow that is fantastic. Great work on the paint job and I really like your color choice.

  16. #191
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    Default Re: An Off the Grid Calendar Islands Yawl Build

    Berniebac - Thank you!

    The heat gun is fantastic. It is not as powerful as a plug-in-power model, but plenty hot for epoxy. A 6Ah battery lasted an incredible 20 minutes on the high setting.

    I will post pics later, but last coat is on and looking good. Clint visited this past weekend, and left me with a few good tips to keep this project moving. I can't tell you how valuable good support for a kit like this is. Great product and fantastic and responsive support.

    I'm going to let the paint harden for a few days, turnover scheduled for Friday. Today will be removing the tape from (pretty much) everything and possibly getting a coat or two of varnish on the bright bits. Friday I will install the half oval on the stem and skeg before turnover. Pics will come between now and then.

    I spent a lot of time over the winter finishing the transom, with the idea that I could protect it during the build. That was an abject failure - everything is now sanded off, and once I clean up a couple of paint drips I can start over. Live and learn!

    So far I'm very happy with the results. Can't wait to get to interior finishing.
    I swear I'm half done.

  17. #192
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    Default Re: An Off the Grid Calendar Islands Yawl Build

    Finally, a picture after I was able to remove the lady's clothing (blue painter's tape).

    I swear I'm half done.

  18. #193
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    Default Re: An Off the Grid Calendar Islands Yawl Build

    Yesterday was turnover day. Several friends with strong backs and weak minds arrived to help out with the turnover. It took me about an hour to unstick the hull from all of the places where screws, blocks, and epoxy squeeze out had made the hull and strongback one with one another. After that was done the turnover was a non event.



    While the hull was outside, we had some time to test out a roadside
    "freebie" find - a trailer. A friend had been working on rehabbing it and modifying it to approximate a fit to the boat. She ended up looking halfway decent for a free trailer. The only purchases were two new tires/wheels to replace the dry rotted originals, a new set of bunks, and some hardware to replace old, rusted stuff.



    Finally in her new cradle, ready for interior finishing.



    boy, there's a lot more cleanup than I thought there would be. Sheesh!



    Now the big question... What to do with the strongback? It's all MDF, so I don't want to burn it. It would probably be good speaker box material, but I don't need stereo speakers and frankly don't know much about design of same. Your ideas appreciated before the recip saw and I take to it, and send it to the dump (for a cost).
    I swear I'm half done.

  19. #194
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    Default Re: An Off the Grid Calendar Islands Yawl Build

    Very nice. Looks awfully "boat like" now.

  20. #195
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    Default Re: An Off the Grid Calendar Islands Yawl Build

    Good looking boat. The blue is nice!

  21. #196
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    Default Re: An Off the Grid Calendar Islands Yawl Build

    Re the strongback:
    Check with Clint. If he has another kit going out, perhaps the pieces can be re-cycled.

  22. #197
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    Default Re: An Off the Grid Calendar Islands Yawl Build

    The strongback material I use is called FLakeboard in industry terms, or Chipboard. It is gluey so won't be very nice to burn. I do not recycle them because they can be weakened easily and screw holes and the like...
    But the strongback can be reused as a cradle. SOme builders do that...
    I think Pete has sawhorse cradles I designed for the boat.

    That Sapele ply looks great!
    Clinton B. Chase
    Portland, Maine

    http://tinyurl.com/myboats

  23. #198
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    Default Re: An Off the Grid Calendar Islands Yawl Build

    Yes the strongback is not mdf like I thought. off to the dump with you.

    I was sanding the boat interior after cleaning epoxy goo for 3 days and ended up straining my back. I'm planning on a few days off before resuming work.

    Before the back issue, I was able to fit and glue the first rubrail. Here's a teaser taken before the clamps came off

    I swear I'm half done.

  24. #199
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    Default Re: An Off the Grid Calendar Islands Yawl Build

    Rubrails completed!

    I swear I'm half done.

  25. #200
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    Default Re: An Off the Grid Calendar Islands Yawl Build

    Then I moved on to fiberglass tape and cloth in the two midship sections. this is just another way to experience pain in places I didn't know I had. A little bit of extra stretching that this body isn't used to. But we survived.

    Following that I faired the fiberglass edges, where the garboard meets the first plank. That joint bevel was a challenge to get prefect, the fairing compound cleaned up the joint nicely. While the fairing compound was curing I fit the two inwales. I fit them into slots in the breasthook, and then went flush to the transom. The knees will attach to the inwales. in retrospect i should have probably slotted the knees and then carried the inwales flush to the bow, because the breasthook is sapele, the inwales are ash, as are the knees. Oh well, something to consider for the next boat (which would come complete with a new spousal unit I'm told! ).



    I admit I'm getting a little lazy with the pictures, but where we are we have to use a cellular hotspot that has some tight bandwidth limits. one of the joys of being off the grid.

    Next I'll be cleaning up the rubrails and starting to finish the work needed on the 3 watertight compartments, as well as many many fillets.
    I swear I'm half done.

  26. #201
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    Default Re: An Off the Grid Calendar Islands Yawl Build

    The Rubrails turned out better than I had ever hoped. the plan lurking in the back of my mind was to finish them as much as possible here in Maine, then over the winter I would fabricate some 1/8" thick ash "covers" to hide the exposed sapele ply edge. But after sanding, that edge looks great so I think I'll keep it.



    I then started on sanding, filleting seams, and preparing the watertight compartments. Some of that includes installing the mizzen step and partner. At this point I'm still in heavy prep mode, no sense wasting bandwidth showing that. More pics as items are finished. As a side note, I've burned through more 80 grit sandpaper than i could have ever imagined. I'm thinking that soon the sandpaper cost may exceed that of the boat!
    I swear I'm half done.

  27. #202
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    Default Re: An Off the Grid Calendar Islands Yawl Build

    SFCF. Sanding (and sanding, and sanding! ), filleting, cleats, and fairing. This is now my life. so progress seems slow.



    Then I thought it would be a good idea to drill a 1" hole in the bottom of the boat.



    At Clint's suggestion I'm installing the floor drain just aft of the middle bulkhead, where its out of the way but also in a spot that will drain well. After drilling the hole I discovered that the brass drain had a depth that far exceeded the bottom plank thickness. First I filed / sanded down the plug body as far as I could, within a half thread of the plug (when tight). I still had just about a 1/16" protruding the hull, so I fabricated a thin disc to place under the plug body to make the plug flush with the bottom. It won't drain quite as much water as I'd like, but will still be useful without impacting performance.

    Here's what the plug at the bottom looks like before I retrimit with paint

    I swear I'm half done.

  28. #203
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    Default Re: An Off the Grid Calendar Islands Yawl Build

    Drilling holes in boats is one of my favorite things to do!

    Nice job on plug!
    Clinton B. Chase
    Portland, Maine

    http://tinyurl.com/myboats

  29. #204
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    Default Re: An Off the Grid Calendar Islands Yawl Build

    Thanks Clint!

    It actually felt productive today, even though it took a full half day to fit the bow tank top. I'm really happy with the result though.



    This enabled me to accurately mark the cleat locations, which are now glued and curing. I spent the afternoon fiting the stern tank tops, but it's still a work in progress.

    Perhaps next time I'll tell the "fourth time is a charm" story of the rogue boomkin fabrication saga. Stay tuned!
    Last edited by Pete Bergquist; 09-11-2020 at 05:51 PM.
    I swear I'm half done.

  30. #205
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    Default Re: An Off the Grid Calendar Islands Yawl Build

    Darn!, I forgot to take pics for the boomkin caper. The story will come though.

    I've spent more time sanding, filleting, and fairing. The stem tank tops are fitted and ready for epoxy, and all of the floor boards are epoxied and filleted. I'll have some pics of the stern and bow tanks completed for the next entry. Here's what the stern tanks look like before sealing. I didn't do a perfect job finishing since they are hidden from view, but I did want to make them nice and bright.



    In the meantime, with all the prep work I was getting a little down because of the lack of visible progress, so I took another little detour and added in a bit of bling.



    An uncirculated silver liberty dollar, or as I'll refer to her, "Lady Covid". She's right in the middle of the transom arch. Right now the transom just has an epoxy coating and hasn't been sanded or finished.
    I swear I'm half done.

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