Results 1 to 31 of 31

Thread: Mariners Museum, Newport News, VA

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2018
    Location
    Southwest Iowa, USA
    Posts
    24

    Default Mariners Museum, Newport News, VA

    Yesterday, I had the pleasure to walk through the Mariner's Museum in Newport News, Virginia. If you're not familiar with it, it was designated as the National Maritime Museum by Congress, and is one of the largest maritime museums in North America. In addition to the various displays, it also houses the largest maritime history collection in the Western Hemisphere (thanks, Wikipedia).

    The headlining act is the conservation of the wreck of the USS MONITOR. They're desalinating, stabilizing, and generally preserving all the various pieces they've brought up from the briny deep. They even have a full size model of the MONITOR outside, plus a whole exhibit on her development as well as that of the CSS VIRGINIA (ex-MERRIMACK).

    So, in other words, it's pretty damn cool. And the cost of entry is $1!

    They also have a wing dedicated to exploration, Naval history, a model gallery, an exhibit housing the ENTIRE Oracle Team USA AC72 catamaran, and--my favorite--the International Small Craft Center.

    Here are some highlights from the ISCC. I have pics from the other wings if there's interest, but I figured I'd start with the eye candy first.



    The Sperwer (Hawk), a circa 1913 Dutch tjotter. Check out that bluff bow! Originally workboats used for transport on the canals and Ijsselmeer (Inland Sea), many have been converted into pleasurecraft.



    Quest, a lovely little 1915 Herreshoff 12-1/2.



    Ada, an 1889 steam launch restored by Frank Fuegeman and relaunched in 1986.



    Teal, a catboat built by the Dexter Brothers around 1927.



    Nat Herreshoff's Dilemma from 1891, the first to have a fin keel. Designed for his personal use, she won every race she entered.



    Foreground: a Yankee skiff from the late 1800s, used for tonging oysters.
    Background: Simokon, a 38' commuter from 1929, made by Chris Smith & Sons Boat Co.

    I think that's about it for the night. I took some closeups of some of the craft if anyone needs the closeup shots. The ISCC also has an online catalog of the whole collection.

    --Elliot

    Edit: Oh man, can I not fix the thread's subject? Thanks a lot, Tapatalk.
    Last edited by smitty053; 08-25-2019 at 09:55 PM. Reason: unsnarled Tapatalk's terrible formatting

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    876

    Default Re: Mariner’s Museum, Newport News, VA

    Stunning! Keep the pics coming. Visiting this place has been on my agenda for way too long.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    9,741

    Default Re: Mariner’s Museum, Newport News, VA

    Wonderful stuff. I was there some years back, but I believe there's more on display now. I need to return. And yes, keep those pictures coming.
    -Dave

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    northeast Ohio
    Posts
    2,865

    Default Re: Mariner’s Museum, Newport News, VA

    Great pictures. The model collection is impressive too.
    Thanks for jogging my memory.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 1999
    Location
    West Boothbay Harbor, Maine
    Posts
    25,037

    Default Re: Mariners Museum, Newport News, VA

    More about DILEMMA: http://www.herreshoff.info/Menu/inde...7_Drusilla.htm

    "Naturally the next step to securing sail carrying ability without increasing L.W.L. was the fin keeler. The first of these, Dilemma, was designed and owned by my father. She came out in 1891 and was soon followed by a great many others and they cleaned up nearly all the important classes in both England and this country. ... But if outside ballast had given trouble in hull structure when it was first used, the fin keeler gave much more trouble, so the Wise Men of the Club barred out fin keelers in toto, but it must be admitted that nearly all of these yachts that had been designed by the original inventor did not leak a particle, for their keels were scientifically secured to deep floor timbers. Not so, however, with the many imitations which leaked like crates." (Source: Herreshoff, L. Francis. The Common Sense of Yacht Design. Vol. II. New York, 1948, p. 41.)

    "Captain Nat's next sailboat was the famous finkeeler 'Dilemma' built in 1891. She was the first so-called fin and bulb keel boat, but as I am to describe her in a following chapter I will only say now that he used her but one season." (Source: Herreshoff, L. Francis. The Wizard of Bristol. The Life and Achievements of Nathanael Greene Herreshoff, together with An Account of Some of the Yachts he Designed. New York, 1953, p. 117.)

    "While Captain Nat was sailing 'Gloriana' his active mind worked out the structural problems which made the fin keeler possible. He used to say he did not invent the fin keel, that it had been invented before his time, but there is no doubt N. G. Herreshoff designed the first sizable boat that was to use a fin keel. Of course there had been many model yachts previously with a plate and bulb keel: there had been experiments with heavily weighted centerboards, and there had been some ill-shaped cast-iron keels tried which with a stretch of imagination might be called fin keels. But Captain Nat's 'Dilemma' was the first successful fin keeler. 'Dilemma' was built for himself and came out in the fall of 1891, the same year as 'Gloriana.' Her sail plan may look old-fashioned nowadays, the sails are of about the proportions then in vogue with the smaller yachts descended from the Sandbaggers. 'Dilemma' was a decided success and was followed by many other fin keelers. The Herreshoff Company built about one hundred of them in all, and in the few years before they were barred from racing they quite took the place of all other types." (Source: Herreshoff, L. Francis. The Wizard of Bristol. The Life and Achievements of Nathanael Greene Herreshoff, together with An Account of Some of the Yachts he Designed. New York, 1953, p. 164-166.)

    "When the designer of Gloriana was steering her in the races of 1891, his thoughts and imagination were stimulated and he conceived both the fin and bulb keels as means to acquire the stiffness to get more driving power from the sails, or to be able to carry more sail. ...
    The first fin keeler was named Dilemma. She came out late in the season of 1891 and must have been built very quickly, but, as Mr. Herreshoff designed her for himself and had her built in his own yacht yard, I suppose they could proceed with the work at once without the delays of contracts, specifications, et cetera, but it seems remarkable to me that two such yachts as Gloriana and Dilemma should come out in the same year. Dilemma, although her low, long sails look old-fashioned today, was a very fast boat for her time. While Mr. Herreshoff said he did not invent the fin keelers, still everyone at the time considered Dilemma the first successful full-size yacht to have a fin keel. It is probable that model yachts and toy boats had been made with fin keels before, and experiments had been tried with weighted centerboards, but Mr. Herreshoff was the first to work out the problems of construction which allowed the fin keel to be safe and satisfactory on a sizeable boat." (Source: Herreshoff, L. Francis. An Introduction to Yachting. New York, 1963, p. 100.)

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2018
    Location
    Southwest Iowa, USA
    Posts
    24

    Default

    Thanks, rbgarr! On that note, here’s some more Dilemma.





    That sucker looks like it’s bolted on pretty well.





    Not exactly a plush cockpit.
    Last edited by smitty053; 08-26-2019 at 10:54 AM.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Richmond, Virginia
    Posts
    13,276

    Default Re: Mariners Museum, Newport News, VA

    It's a great museum. Their figurehead collection is impressive.
    Skip

    ---This post is delivered with righteous passion and with a solemn southern directness --
    ...........fighting against the deliberate polarization of politics...

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Mountain lakes of Vermont
    Posts
    18,010

    Default Re: Mariners Museum, Newport News, VA

    Nice stuff! Thanks for posting. I assume the H-12 1/2 looks like it has a curved mast becasue of the camera lense?
    I was born on a wooden boat that I built myself.
    Skiing is the next best thing to having wings.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr 1999
    Location
    West Boothbay Harbor, Maine
    Posts
    25,037

    Default Re: Mariners Museum, Newport News, VA

    It's all laid out and displayed much more appealingly than when I was last there in the 80s. Good!

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2001
    Location
    Seattle
    Posts
    29,034

    Default Re: Mariners Museum, Newport News, VA

    Quote Originally Posted by smitty053 View Post
    Thanks, rbgarr! On that note, here’s some more Dilemma.





    That sucker looks like it’s bolted on pretty well.





    Not exactly a plush cockpit.
    I had no idea she was still in existence. Pretty big for a daysailer.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Nov 2016
    Location
    Coastal Marshland, VA, USA
    Posts
    73

    Default Re: Mariners Museum, Newport News, VA

    The Mariners Museum is about 20 mins from where I am setting. One of our under used jewels
    I don't cuss much for a sailor - that said, I may cuss to much for a preacher...

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Apr 1999
    Location
    West Boothbay Harbor, Maine
    Posts
    25,037

    Default Re: Mariners Museum, Newport News, VA

    Quote Originally Posted by johnw View Post
    I had no idea she was still in existence. Pretty big for a daysailer.
    If I recall right, all the planks and decking are full length.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Mar 2018
    Location
    Southwest Iowa, USA
    Posts
    24

    Default Re: Mariners Museum, Newport News, VA

    Quote Originally Posted by Rich Jones View Post
    Nice stuff! Thanks for posting. I assume the H-12 1/2 looks like it has a curved mast becasue of the camera lense?
    It's definitely straight, but it sure looks curved! Mostly because I took a panoramic photo to get the whole thing in the frame. I was wondering if anyone would notice.

    Quote Originally Posted by johnw View Post
    I had no idea she was still in existence. Pretty big for a daysailer.
    Just your average 38' daysailer. I bet she's a blast to sail, but I don't believe we'll get that chance.

    Quote Originally Posted by rbgarr View Post
    If I recall right, all the planks and decking are full length.
    The decking certainly looks full length. I didn't check out the planking closely enough to tell.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Mar 2018
    Location
    Southwest Iowa, USA
    Posts
    24

    Default

    The collection continues with tonight's installment:



    The Seaflash, a 1956 runabout from Aristocraft in Georgia.



    A new addition, this dhow was built in Lamu, Kenya and is on loan from the Smithsonian. These little guys are everywhere around the Middle East, and are super hard to see at night from the bridge of a ship. Just sayin'.



    A Venetian gondola, which you don't see every day.



    A 1936 Sinepuxent Skiff, used for all manner of fishing on the Chesapeake and Atlantic, and for recreation when outboards became popular.



    Your average Grand Banks dory. Hauled out on the decks of schooners, fishermen would man these fishing cod all day. In the 1800s, the average cod weighed about 50 pounds, and each dory could hold about 4,000 pounds of fish.

    That's a ton (or two, technically) of fish.

    This particular model is from circa 1935 from Lowell's Boat Shop in Amesbury, MA, the oldest boat building facility in the US (1793) and is still in operation.



    Much Quicker is a sailing canoe from circa 1906. They were wildly popular at the turn of the century, known as the poor man's yacht. Easy to build, designs were found in many magazines of the time. The plank seat slides in and out for balance, which sounds fun.
    Last edited by smitty053; 08-26-2019 at 10:16 PM. Reason: The photo order went all pear shaped on me.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    NorCAL
    Posts
    20,598

    Default Re: Mariners Museum, Newport News, VA

    ‘Tis strange to worship wonderful boats without water. There is a bit of sadness with each one without it.
    Without friends none of this is possible.

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    victoria, australia. (1 address now)
    Posts
    71,391

    Default Re: Mariners Museum, Newport News, VA

    More than a hint of Flash Gordon in this one….


    ….or maybe Batman……………...

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Apr 1999
    Location
    West Boothbay Harbor, Maine
    Posts
    25,037

    Default Re: Mariners Museum, Newport News, VA

    Quote Originally Posted by smitty053 View Post
    Your average Grand Banks dory. Hauled out on the decks of schooners, fishermen would man these fishing cod all day. In the 1800s, the average cod weighed about 50 pounds, and each dory could hold about 4,000 pounds of fish.

    That's a ton (or two, technically) of fish.
    Hauling halibut to fill a dory was an even more impressive feat.

    AloneAtSea_p359.jpg
    Attached Images Attached Images

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Apr 1999
    Location
    West Boothbay Harbor, Maine
    Posts
    25,037

    Default Re: Mariners Museum, Newport News, VA

    Quote Originally Posted by skuthorp View Post
    More than a hint of Flash Gordon in this one….


    ….or maybe Batman……………...
    AristoCraft. It seems odd that's in a museum. They are still made: https://aristocraftboats.com/

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Mar 2018
    Location
    Southwest Iowa, USA
    Posts
    24

    Default Re: Mariners Museum, Newport News, VA

    Quote Originally Posted by rbgarr View Post
    Hauling halibut to fill a dory was an even more impressive feat.
    I think I saw this the other day. Very impressed. Those gents are giving their freeboard a run for its money.

    Quote Originally Posted by rbgarr View Post
    AristoCraft. It seems odd that's in a museum. They are still made: https://aristocraftboats.com/
    Nice looking little boats, though

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Mar 2018
    Location
    Southwest Iowa, USA
    Posts
    24

    Default

    Let’s check out a couple sides and sterns this evening.



    To me, the Sperwer is one of the coolest boats in the place. It has fantastic detail.



    Ada’s
    stern.



    Aft end of Teal.



    Gotta throw in some new stuff, too!

    Meet Sassy, an outboard hydroplane. These races were big following WW2, and plans could be found in many magazines.



    Here’s Sue, a 19’ Chris-Craft runabout from 1935. In the mid 1920s, Chris Smith was moving away from high speed racing motorboats and toward pleasure boats. By the mid ‘30s, he was making a variety of high quality runabouts and commuter craft.



    Compare that to the Miss Belle Isle, a 26’ runabout built in 1923, and the oldest known Chris-Craft in existence.

    Rather than custom boats like many other manufacturers of the time, Smith adopted some of Henry Ford’s techniques of mass production, manufacturing a limited range of models built to highly standards.

    Like many other Chris-Crafts of her vintage, the Miss Belle Isle is powered by a WWI Curtis OX-5 aircraft engine, and could’ve been yours for $2950 new.
    Last edited by smitty053; 08-28-2019 at 07:27 PM.

  21. #21
    Join Date
    Mar 2018
    Location
    Southwest Iowa, USA
    Posts
    24

    Default

    Another post or two and that's about it for the Marine's Museum. In fact, here's the last boat (that I took pictures of, anyway) from the ISCC:



    This is Jasyto, Hampton One-design #1 from 1934, built on speculation by Vincent Serio and Harry Bulifant at Hampton Roads Boat Works. The Hampton Ones remain an active class around the Chesapeake Bay.



    That's it for the ISCC. The rest is a few highlights from the rest of the museum.

    The crown jewel of the museum is the wreck of the MONITOR. They have an extensive display that goes through the transition from sailing warships to steaming warships that was fascinating. With that development came changes in armament and tactics.

    The above is a model of the rather unusual USN barge GEORGE WASHINGTON PARKE CUSTIS. Named after the president's grandson, it housed an artillery spotting balloon and the hydrogen-generating equipment to inflate it. It saw considerable service in the 1862 Peninsular Campaign.



    A model of the CSS VIRGINIA (ex-MERRIMACK)...



    ...and the life-sized partial reproduction. While historians don't know exactly what she looked like, this is the best guess based on drawings and correspondence.

    The USS MERRIMACK was the first of six screw frigates (a steamship, though still with a full suit of sails) laid down in 1854. Decommissioned in 1860, she was moored at the Norfolk Navy Yard when Virginia seceded. The Engineer in Chief managed to get her engines lit off, but secessionists sank light boats and blocked the channel and thus, her escape. Before evacuating, Union sailors burned her to the waterline and scuttled her, along with burning most of the Navy Yard.

    The Confederacy, in desperate need of a navy, raised her hull and rebuilt her as an ironclad ram. The rest, as they say, is history.



    Inside the mock-up. It's quite well done.

    Wikipedia has a great write up on both ships that I highly recommend.



    Next time: the MONITOR. The museum has a life-sized exterior reproduction outside. You can even walk around on deck!
    Last edited by smitty053; 09-10-2019 at 09:48 AM.

  22. #22
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    magnolia springs, alabama u.s.a.
    Posts
    14,403

    Default Re: Mariners Museum, Newport News, VA

    I took a WoodenBoat School class there from Larry Murray. I freakin' loved it. Their collection wasn't as nicely displayed as it is now, but we got to see everything. They had a fantastic workshop area.

    Mickey Lake
    'A disciple of the Norse god of aesthetically pleasing boats, Johan Anker'

  23. #23
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    294

    Default Re: Mariners Museum, Newport News, VA

    Decades ago I visited the Museum and encountered the Tappan Adney birchbark canoe collection. Absolutely stunning. Over one hundred Native American models.
    This was before the recent renovations to the Museum. Is the ‘collection’ still on display?

  24. #24
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Saint Helena Island, SC
    Posts
    12,598

    Default Re: Mariners Museum, Newport News, VA

    Thanks for posting this. Next long ORF layover I get I’m going to head over there.
    Fight Entropy, build a wooden boat!

  25. #25
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    East Quogue,NY
    Posts
    25,781

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by smitty053 View Post
    The collection continues with tonight's installment:



    The Seaflash, a 1956 runabout from Aristocraft in Georgia.



    A new addition, this dhow was built in Lamu, Kenya and is on loan from the Smithsonian. These little guys are everywhere around the Middle East, and are super hard to see at night from the bridge of a ship. Just sayin'.



    A Venetian gondola, which you don't see every day.



    A 1936 Sinepuxent Skiff, used for all manner of fishing on the Chesapeake and Atlantic, and for recreation when outboards became popular.



    Your average Grand Banks dory. Hauled out on the decks of schooners, fishermen would man these fishing cod all day. In the 1800s, the average cod weighed about 50 pounds, and each dory could hold about 4,000 pounds of fish.

    That's a ton (or two, technically) of fish.

    This particular model is from circa 1935 from Lowell's Boat Shop in Amesbury, MA, the oldest boat building facility in the US (1793) and is still in operation.



    Much Quicker is a sailing canoe from circa 1906. They were wildly popular at the turn of the century, known as the poor man's yacht. Easy to build, designs were found in many magazines of the time. The plank seat slides in and out for balance, which sounds fun.


    I thought that the banks dories were fitted with removable thwarts to facilitate nesting? These seem to be permanently affixed? Anyone have any input?


    Kevin




    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
    There are two kinds of boaters: those who have run aground, and those who lie about it.

  26. #26
    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Location
    Fiddletown, on Vineyard Lane
    Posts
    3,780

    Default Re: Mariners Museum, Newport News, VA

    Super cool. Incidentally I am flying into VA today. I hadn't thought about any tourist stuff but I might be able to go tomorrow.
    Re-naming straits as necessary.

  27. #27
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    2 states: NJ and confusion
    Posts
    44,050

    Default Re: Mariners Museum, Newport News, VA

    I visited some years back, and likely have photos, but probably not anything not covered here already. Will look
    "Banning books and not guns seems backwards. Can't think of anyone ever shot by a book

  28. #28
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    2 states: NJ and confusion
    Posts
    44,050

    Default Re: Mariners Museum, Newport News, VA

    c 088.jpg
    Attached Images Attached Images
    "Banning books and not guns seems backwards. Can't think of anyone ever shot by a book

  29. #29
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    2 states: NJ and confusion
    Posts
    44,050

    Default Re: Mariners Museum, Newport News, VA

    "Banning books and not guns seems backwards. Can't think of anyone ever shot by a book

  30. #30
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    2 states: NJ and confusion
    Posts
    44,050

    Default Re: Mariners Museum, Newport News, VA

    "Banning books and not guns seems backwards. Can't think of anyone ever shot by a book

  31. #31
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    2 states: NJ and confusion
    Posts
    44,050

    Default Re: Mariners Museum, Newport News, VA

    Can't seem to post photo of my wife next to ship model
    "Banning books and not guns seems backwards. Can't think of anyone ever shot by a book

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •