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Thread: Safety at Sea during the Early Industrial Revolution

  1. #1
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    Default Safety at Sea during the Early Industrial Revolution

    Interesting overview of the improvements in ships and shipping in the late 18th century http://www.ucd.ie/t4cms/WP17_11.pdf
    2019: returning from being sidelined with medical probs, crossing fingers worst is over, still in "armchair enthusiast" mode for time being.

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Safety at Sea during the Early Industrial Revolution

    Thanks! That looks to be an interesting read

  3. #3
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    Default Re: Safety at Sea during the Early Industrial Revolution

    It is an interesting read just to watch how the compounded efficiency of shipping grew over the years! And, they did it all without Sat Nav!
    Jay

  4. #4
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    Default Re: Safety at Sea during the Early Industrial Revolution

    In a similar vein, Samuel Plimsol is a great study, his own books are enlightening, and some of the more recent biograpies may be a more comprehensive study of the man himself. He was an interesting character, and in my opinion he had more to do with safety at sea than any other.


  5. #5
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    Default Re: Safety at Sea during the Early Industrial Revolution

    Exceptionally good. Very many thanks.

    I have a reprint of Plimsoll’s “Our Seamen - An Appeal”.

    Here is an illustration from it.



    In 1982 my then employers ordered a ship from Sunderland Shipbuilders Ltd, with a Clark Kincaid B&W main engine made in Glasgow.

    We found that one of its main holding down bolts was a “devil” with the stub epoxied in.

    Not all shipowners were swine.

    Thompson’s Aberdeen Line - owners of the THERMOPYLAE - named a passenger clipper after Samuel Plimsoll, in 1873z and asked him to name her - he turned up but gave the honour to her young Master’s wife, Mrs Boaden.





    She made I think 15 voyages to Sydney from London then transferred to the Melbourne service. She typically carried 360 passengers.

    this picture shows her figurehead after another dismasting:
    Last edited by Andrew Craig-Bennett; 08-08-2019 at 05:17 PM.
    IMAGINES VEL NON FUERINT

  6. #6
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    Default Re: Safety at Sea during the Early Industrial Revolution

    In 1879 the Samuel Plimsoll still under the command of Richard Boaden was in the Atlantic outbound when she was hit ba a squall which carried away the bobstay and thus, of course, the bowsprit the fore topgallant and the main topgallant masts and spars, disabling her. An American clipper also bound for Sydney was in company and offered to take her passengers aboard.

    Captain Boaden declined the offer, repaired the rig at sea and arrived before the American ship. She was in the passenger trade between Britain and Australia for 27 years until she was sold in 1900. That is a phenomenal record for any ship.

    Last edited by Andrew Craig-Bennett; 08-08-2019 at 05:46 PM.
    IMAGINES VEL NON FUERINT

  7. #7
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    Default Re: Safety at Sea during the Early Industrial Revolution

    Quote Originally Posted by Plyboy View Post
    Interesting overview of the improvements in ships and shipping in the late 18th century http://www.ucd.ie/t4cms/WP17_11.pdf
    Thanks, that's fascinating!

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