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Thread: Peerie Maa's great great uncle.

  1. #1
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    Default Peerie Maa's great great uncle.

    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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  2. #2
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    Default Re: Peerie Maa's great great uncle.

    Beautiful. Ballasted?

  3. #3
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    Default Re: Peerie Maa's great great uncle.

    Wow. Thanks for posting. Really enjoyed that.
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    And in his eye the endless waves ride on into the sun.

  4. #4
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    Default Re: Peerie Maa's great great uncle.

    Quote Originally Posted by J.Madison View Post
    Beautiful. Ballasted?
    Yes, she will have been. They used beach stone, dumping it as they filled up with fish.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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  5. #5
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    Default Re: Peerie Maa's great great uncle.

    That little boat steps out quite well for the amount of breeze that is blowing. Well done Nick but I sould think that "Bob's your uncle!"
    Jay

  6. #6
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    Default Re: Peerie Maa's great great uncle.

    Wonderful Nick, thank you. What is she, around 24 foot?

  7. #7
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    Default Re: Peerie Maa's great great uncle.

    That was greatly enjoyed.

    I'd love to see one tack.
    Creationists aren't mad - they're possessed of demons.

  8. #8
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    Default Re: Peerie Maa's great great uncle.

    Quote Originally Posted by lupussonic View Post
    Wonderful Nick, thank you. What is she, around 24 foot?
    Ironically there is little published about her dimensions. Far Haff sixareens were typically 20 foot of keel, 28 over the stems and 8 foot beam.
    Quote Originally Posted by P.I. Stazzer-Newt View Post
    That was greatly enjoyed.

    I'd love to see one tack.
    Although called and derived from square sails (notice the shrouds), the sail was dipped to go about.
    Those guys were taking it easy in the light air, the halyard was made off to a cleat. Normally the second most experienced crew member held it in the hand, and dropped the sail if she took off in a gust and started to plane.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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  9. #9
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    Default Re: Peerie Maa's great great uncle.

    Quote Originally Posted by Peerie Maa View Post
    Yes, she will have been. They used beach stone, dumping it as they filled up with fish.
    I really love the feel of a ballasted open boat, but they start to make me nervous as the sea gets up. Dipping the gunnel seems very easy to do. I wonder how many never came home over the years.

  10. #10
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    Default Re: Peerie Maa's great great uncle.

    Thanks for sharing, very nice.
    Cheers
    Kent and Skipper
    Small Boat Restoration blog

  11. #11
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    Default Re: Peerie Maa's great great uncle.

    Quote Originally Posted by J.Madison View Post
    I really love the feel of a ballasted open boat, but they start to make me nervous as the sea gets up. Dipping the gunnel seems very easy to do. I wonder how many never came home over the years.
    There were a few lost. If they had a good haul of fish, they would lay the flatfish on top like a slate roof over the catch. Then the helmsman would try to take any green seas on the fish, so that it went right across and off the other side. They also used a shovel to throw the water back from a room kept clear for the purpose.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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  12. #12
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    Default Re: Peerie Maa's great great uncle.

    FYI There is a Lines Plan of the Sixareen Spinnoway in the nifty book "The Sixareen and her Racing Descendants" by Charles Sandison which (I think) Nick mentioned a while ago. Her LOA is given as 30' -0", LWL 26'- 9", beam (Max) 8'- 1" (a little hard to make out) prismatic coefficient .63, displacement 3.33 tons (really hard to make out) Sail Area 270 Sq Ft.

  13. #13
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    Default Re: Peerie Maa's great great uncle.

    Lovely.

  14. #14
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    Default Re: Peerie Maa's great great uncle.

    I have always found it facinating that if I used the local boatbuilding tradition here in Österbotten as a starting point and tweaked the hull shape by eye to what I think would make boats better adapted to the sort of conditions that I would expect to find in Shetland....... and whoops...... there is a yoal and a sixareen.
    I am despite my limited boatbuilding experience able to follow the line of thoughts of the builders who developed those boats.

    The only thing that I find strange with Shetland boats is the framing system with the fastiband nailed to the side of the frame.
    However Shetland boats derive from what the Norwegians call Hjeltbåter that is boats built in western Norway to be stackabble for export to Shetland. I understand that the Norwegian builders had to omit the normal "beite" to make the boats stackable and instead put in an ondinary frame which upon delivery in Shetland could be reinforced with a nailed in fastiband.
    Amateur living on the western coast of Finland

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