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Thread: lugger rigging

  1. #1
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    Default lugger rigging

    lugger.jpg

    Hi all, Has anybody sailed aboard a Bisquine lugger such as this? I'm building a similar rig and I've been trying to figure out the halyard arrangement. I believe the halyard passes through the top of the mast over a sheave, but I'm not sure if the sheave should run fore and aft, crossways, or at a 45 degree angle.
    I know they sail as a standing lug most of the time, in which case a 45 degree angle makes the most sense to me. However, for long passages it seems like it would be useful to dip the lug to avoid chafe. In that case I would think you would want the sheave to run fore and aft?
    I've bought every book I can think of about luggers but if anybody has any resources they could recommend please do!
    Thanks for your help!

  2. #2
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    Default Re: lugger rigging

    I've sailed a few 40 - 50 footers. Halyard sheave is often fore an aft for a dipping lug sail, athwartships for a standing lug sail. Many lug ketches do not dip the mizzen, so that gives you a clue about what to do with the mizzen halyard sheave. Often the mizzen is only ever raised on one side.

    You will notice that La Cancalaise has her sails hauled up on opposing sides of her masts, to get the worst of both sails one at a time according to her tack. She is based on a working fishing boat, and does just fine however when racing.

    What are you building?

  3. #3
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    Default Re: lugger rigging

    Quote Originally Posted by lupussonic View Post
    You will notice that La Cancalaise has her sails hauled up on opposing sides of her masts, to get the worst of both sails one at a time according to her tack. She is based on a working fishing boat, and does just fine however when racing.
    The Breton standing luggers do not dip their sails. They may be the only luggers to rig peak halyards as well, in order to relieve some of the massive forces in the luff of the sail.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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  4. #4
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    Default Re: lugger rigging

    No standing luggers dip their sails.

  5. #5
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    Default Re: lugger rigging

    Not familiar with that particular lug, but I'm a bit of a caretaker of the 10 close to 150-200 years old ships boats we have at work.

    One can argue that these rigs are satee and not lug, but I believe it makes no difference in this case.
    Perhaps interesting that the fore sail is hoisted on the port side of the mast and the main on the starboard side on both boat types, perhaps only a coinsidence...

    Anyways, the sheaves on our boats mast tops goes sideways.

    /Mats

    Elected Swedish Yourneyman of the Year 2019

  6. #6
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    Default Re: lugger rigging

    Quote Originally Posted by mohsart View Post
    Not familiar with that particular lug, but I'm a bit of a caretaker of the 10 close to 150-200 years old ships boats we have at work.

    One can argue that these rigs are satee and not lug, but I believe it makes no difference in this case.
    Perhaps interesting that the fore sail is hoisted on the port side of the mast and the main on the starboard side on both boat types, perhaps only a coinsidence...

    Anyways, the sheaves on our boats mast tops goes sideways.

    /Mats
    They are a bit of a hybrid. Luffs a bit tall for a settee, rigged with shrouds, do not dip, but the tack is a long way forward for most standing lug sails. I would say that they are more settee than lug.

    I tend to agree that athwart-ships sheaves are best for a standing lug.

    I recall my father saying that my grandfathers dipping lugger had the sheave athwartship as well. He was paranoid about chafe, but it meant that they had to rotate the mast when dipping the lug.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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  7. #7
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    Default Re: lugger rigging

    Quote Originally Posted by Peerie Maa View Post
    They are a bit of a hybrid. Luffs a bit tall for a settee, rigged with shrouds, do not dip, but the tack is a long way forward for most standing lug sails. I would say that they are more settee than lug.

    I tend to agree that athwart-ships sheaves are best for a standing lug.

    I recall my father saying that my grandfathers dipping lugger had the sheave athwartship as well. He was paranoid about chafe, but it meant that they had to rotate the mast when dipping the lug.
    Agreed, most of the boats have horses that the tack is attached to, which allows for a placement more forward than would otherwise be reasonable. After every tack or gybe, the tack is pushed over to the other side (to windward) of the horse.

    /Mats

    Elected Swedish Yourneyman of the Year 2019

  8. #8
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    Default Re: lugger rigging

    Quote Originally Posted by mohsart View Post
    Agreed, most of the boats have horses that the tack is attached to, which allows for a placement more forward than would otherwise be reasonable. After every tack or gybe, the tack is pushed over to the other side (to windward) of the horse.

    /Mats
    Loch Fyne skiffs also had a short horse for the tack, but it was at the foot of the mast. I do not think that anyone recorded how they worked though.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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  9. #9
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    Default Re: lugger rigging

    Ambergris.jpg

    Hi all,
    Thanks for your advice about bisquine lugger rigging. It seems like having the sheave run athwartships makes the most sense.
    I've attached a picture of my boat. She's 60 foot on deck and about 70 overall. I bought her as a bare hull and have been sailing around with a jury rig- 2 marconi mainsails that I chopped the tops of and made into lugsails! I'm thinking to shorten the foremast a bit and add a mizzen mast close to the stern with a boomkin and rig her as a 3 masted junk, which is basically a standing lug. I sail offshore single handed or short handed quite a bit and I believe that such a rig would be the easiest to handle. However, I like the idea of sailing fast when I have a big crew. Can anybody see any reason why I couldn't switch out the junk rig for a standing lug when desired?
    Another question about bisquine luggers. Does anybody know how the shrouds are arranged? From all the pictures I can see it seems like they are rigged to a block and tackle, I'm assuming so the lee shrouds can be let off to avoid chafe. Makes sense to me!
    Anyways, Thanks again for the advice!

  10. #10
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    Default Re: lugger rigging

    Quote Originally Posted by Ambergris View Post
    Ambergris.jpg


    Another question about bisquine luggers. Does anybody know how the shrouds are arranged? From all the pictures I can see it seems like they are rigged to a block and tackle, I'm assuming so the lee shrouds can be let off to avoid chafe. Makes sense to me!
    Anyways, Thanks again for the advice!
    Just so. there was a block on a pendant from the hounds. A swifter went through this. One end hooked into a shroud plate on the inside of a stanchion, the other end to a double block. This formed the top half of a tackle, the bottom half was a single with becket hooked into a shroud iron on the next aft stanchion. When fishing with the sails brailed up the swifters were taken to the foot of the mast to clear the decks for fishing. Al this is available in the writing of Jean Le Bot
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

    The power of the web: Anyone can post anything on the web
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  11. #11
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    Default Re: lugger rigging

    Quote Originally Posted by Peerie Maa View Post
    Just so. there was a block on a pendant from the hounds. A swifter went through this. One end hooked into a shroud plate on the inside of a stanchion, the other end to a double block. This formed the top half of a tackle, the bottom half was a single with becket hooked into a shroud iron on the next aft stanchion. When fishing with the sails brailed up the swifters were taken to the foot of the mast to clear the decks for fishing. Al this is available in the writing of Jean Le Bot

    Thanks! I just ordered "La bisquine de Cancale et de Granville" by Jean Le Bot.
    Looking forward to learning French!

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