Results 1 to 22 of 22

Thread: Building in flood risk areas

  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    the hills
    Posts
    57,649

    Default Building in flood risk areas

    Lather, rinse, repeat.

    https://www.nytimes.com/2019/07/31/c...-flooding.html

    Christopher Flavelle
    July 31, 2019



    In many coastal states, flood-prone areas have seen the highest rates of home construction since 2010, a study found, suggesting that the risks of climate change have yet to fundamentally change people’s behavior.

    The study, by Climate Central, a New Jersey research group, looked at the 10-year flood risk zone — the area with a 10 percent chance of flooding in any given year — and estimated the zone’s size in 2050. Then the group counted up homes built there since 2010 Christopher Flavelle
    July 31, 2019



    In many coastal states, flood-prone areas have seen the highest rates of home construction since 2010, a study found, suggesting that the risks of climate change have yet to fundamentally change people’s behavior.

    The study, by Climate Central, a New Jersey research group, looked at the 10-year flood risk zone — the area with a 10 percent chance of flooding in any given year — and estimated the zone’s size in 2050. Then the group counted up homes built there since 2010, using data from Zillow, a real estate company.

    For eight states, including Connecticut, Rhode Island, Mississippi and South Carolina, the percentage increase in homes built in the flood zone exceeded the rate of increase in the rest of the state.

    There are many reasons construction persists despite the danger. In some cases it’s urban sprawl, in others it’s a desire among government officials for property-tax revenues. But whatever the reason, this kind of building activity will “come back and bite,” said Benjamin Strauss, president and chief scientist of Climate Central, which produces and publishes research on the effects of global warming.
    Last edited by LeeG; 08-01-2019 at 10:47 AM.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Location
    The Garden State
    Posts
    7,823

    Default Re: Building in flood risk areas

    Having grown up on the barrier islands of New Jersey, I am amazed every time I visit my "home town". What was once a very sleepy town with 16,000 year round residents has actually shrunk to just over 11,000, but all the old small homes are gone, replaced with huge McMansions that are "summer homes" of the well to do. The house my parents bought for $15,000 back in 1974 recently went up for sale for close to half a million. While the city is currently in the process of raising their streets, kerbs, and sidewalks, flooding is still a way of life.. and yet they keep knocking down the homes to build ever bigger.
    "If you think you are too small to make a difference, try sleeping with a mosquito"

    -Dalai Lama

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Walney, near Cumbria UK
    Posts
    50,577

    Default Re: Building in flood risk areas

    Flood zones? Those would be the flat level easy to build on bits, unlike those inconvenient slopey hilly not flat areas.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

    The power of the web: Anyone can post anything on the web
    The weakness of the web: Anyone can post anything on the web.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    NE Scotland
    Posts
    10,601

    Default Re: Building in flood risk areas

    Same in the UK - see this thread - http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthre...ick-Peerie-Maa

    The map I linked to in #4 shows that the housing in that area is along the Mersey river corridor. From 4 metres (13.1 ft) neap tide to 10 metres (32.8 ft) spring tide, the River Mersey has the second highest tidal range in Britain – second only to the River Severn.

    High tide on the Mersey this evening is 9.25 metres, so it's not a maximum spring tide, but still pretty big. If they keep getting heavy rain then they're in trouble.
    Structures uninformed by geometry tend towards the ramshackle.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    afloat with at least 6' of water under me.
    Posts
    63,964

    Default Re: Building in flood risk areas

    I worked on Stream restoration and stabilization in NC for a county on the Ga.line. First, I tried to get the county to develop a flood plain plan. Like pulling teeth. Second, tried the land developers, no go, more tooth pulling. Then, tried land owners, just decided to put home on stilts. Figured that was enough. This section of NC was a total disaster, had to have it their way.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Bainbridge Island WA
    Posts
    3,472

    Default Re: Building in flood risk areas

    https://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-...cture-projects

    Two years ago The Occupant decided to rollback what little movement the Feds had made towards dealing with flooding of public projects.
    Steve

    If you would have a good boat, be a good guy when you build her - honest, careful, patient, strong.
    H.A. Calahan

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Walney, near Cumbria UK
    Posts
    50,577

    Default Re: Building in flood risk areas

    One area where the insurance industry can have influence. No one will build or buy an uninsurable home. Bit of a sod if it has been in the family for decades though.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

    The power of the web: Anyone can post anything on the web
    The weakness of the web: Anyone can post anything on the web.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Arizona
    Posts
    13,207

    Default Re: Building in flood risk areas

    Make the flood insurance so expensive that people can't afford it and don't issue mortgages to homes and buildings that don't have it.
    Pet photography, the degree you get when you fail aromatherapy - Duck D.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2000
    Location
    Douglasville, Ga
    Posts
    6,662

    Default Re: Building in flood risk areas

    Quote Originally Posted by Peerie Maa View Post
    One area where the insurance industry can have influence. No one will build or buy an uninsurable home. Bit of a sod if it has been in the family for decades though.
    You sure about that? I built a home in a flood area. It's insured for fire and theft but not for flood. I carried flood insurance for a while but the so ridiculously high that I choose to self insure. It's a risk but I build to accommodate the risk and know full well I could lose the place and have to rebuild on my own dime. i built it on my own dime a bit at a time and I'll rebuild the same way if I have to. Ten years worth of premiums would come darn close to rebuild costs. I'll take my chances.
    Tom

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    afloat with at least 6' of water under me.
    Posts
    63,964

    Default Re: Building in flood risk areas

    As I said, the county I worked for would not develop a flood plain plan. Hence, no flooding occurs there if you think about it. Insurances need proof that only a flood plain plan can give. I've been there.No, not as a land owner, as a witness.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Bradford, VT
    Posts
    9,047

    Default Re: Building in flood risk areas

    Build wooden boats that can float on the flood

  12. #12
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    the hills
    Posts
    57,649

    Default Re: Building in flood risk areas

    Quote Originally Posted by stromborg View Post
    https://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-...cture-projects

    Two years ago The Occupant decided to rollback what little movement the Feds had made towards dealing with flooding of public projects.
    And a week later hurricane Harvey hit.

    Interestingly with Trumps abdication on this issue HUD continued Obama regulations. Cursory searching comea up with little on the issue.


    https://brownfieldlistings.com/blog/...ed-last-summer

    The policy answer finally arrived last week when the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development gave official notice to states as to how to spend the $7.4 billion in disaster funding Congress approved for Hurricane Harvey recovery. In short, HUD will require essentially the same policies as the ones President Trump quashed last summer. And this specifically includes how grant recipients must "take into account continued sea level rise." HUD grant applicants must include, among other things:
    Last edited by LeeG; 08-01-2019 at 11:05 AM.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Saint Helena Island, SC
    Posts
    10,624

    Default Re: Building in flood risk areas

    Th cost of flood insurance varies tremendously depending on the type of hazard and the construction of the home. If you build to code in an areas subject to inundation, but not wave action its not too bad. We pay about $650/year. High deductible, 10% for named storm and it covers up to $250,000.
    If you’ve got an old house on a slab on the beach it gets pricey. Ive heard $18,000/yr for a place on the northern gulf coast of FL.
    Of course building to code ain’t cheap either, but a water view and a dock in the backyard never was.
    Fight Entropy, build a wooden boat!

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jun 2000
    Location
    Douglasville, Ga
    Posts
    6,662

    Default Re: Building in flood risk areas

    Quote Originally Posted by Reynard38 View Post
    Th cost of flood insurance varies tremendously depending on the type of hazard and the construction of the home. If you build to code in an areas subject to inundation, but not wave action its not too bad. We pay about $650/year. High deductible, 10% for named storm and it covers up to $250,000.
    If you’ve got an old house on a slab on the beach it gets pricey. Ive heard $18,000/yr for a place on the northern gulf coast of FL.
    Of course building to code ain’t cheap either, but a water view and a dock in the backyard never was.
    I built to code and last time I paid flood insurance it was north of 3 k a year which was a subsidized rate. The subsidy was going away which would bring the rate to around 7k and was set to increase yearly to about 10k a year. That is for a lake property that was insuring the structure for about 200k. No way it was worth it at 10k a year..

    Edited to add, the last time I carried flood insurance was 2013 and was notified of changed that were drastically rising rates, it appears that changes were put in place in 2015 that may have made it more affordable. I don't get any updated information on it since I am not actually required to carry it.
    Last edited by Tom Wilkinson; 08-01-2019 at 12:32 PM.
    Tom

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Walney, near Cumbria UK
    Posts
    50,577

    Default Re: Building in flood risk areas

    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Wilkinson View Post
    You sure about that? I built a home in a flood area. It's insured for fire and theft but not for flood. I carried flood insurance for a while but the so ridiculously high that I choose to self insure. It's a risk but I build to accommodate the risk and know full well I could lose the place and have to rebuild on my own dime. i built it on my own dime a bit at a time and I'll rebuild the same way if I have to. Ten years worth of premiums would come darn close to rebuild costs. I'll take my chances.
    You Tom are one in a million.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

    The power of the web: Anyone can post anything on the web
    The weakness of the web: Anyone can post anything on the web.

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    afloat with at least 6' of water under me.
    Posts
    63,964

    Default Re: Building in flood risk areas

    I'm smart enough NOT to build in a flood plain at all.

  17. #17
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Bradford, VT
    Posts
    9,047

    Default Re: Building in flood risk areas

    When we lived in RI we were a couple of blocks from the water in a house built in 1804. We, ridiculously, had to carry flood insurance

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    Kitty Hawk, NC
    Posts
    9,491

    Default Re: Building in flood risk areas

    Quote Originally Posted by LeeG View Post
    There are many reasons construction persists despite the danger. In some cases its urban sprawl, in others its a desire among government officials for property-tax revenues. But whatever the reason, this kind of building activity will come back and bite, said Benjamin Strauss, president and chief scientist of Climate Central, which produces and publishes research on the effects of global warming.
    Most people are either unable or unwilling to determine the consequences of their home buying decision.

    When my home is destroyed by flood, we will simply move. Until then the best economic decision is to stay put.
    Life is complex.

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    victoria, australia. (1 address now)
    Posts
    62,458

    Default Re: Building in flood risk areas

    Here's a whole page of references to the same problem in Australia, and for our area this will also a very local problem.

    https://www.bing.com/search?q=proper...logo=CT3210127

    Cottesloe, Perth, West Australia
    "A leading eco-architect has called for a dramatic rethink of planning along the Cottesloe beachfront amid forecasts that most of the iconic tourist spot could be washed away by the end of the century.
    Ecotect Architects principal and Murdoch University adjunct professor Garry Baverstock said yesterday that a review of the area's geophysics found that the stretch of coastline between the Ocean Beach Hotel and Cottesloe Beach Hotel was mainly sand that sat on bedrock 7-10m down
    ."

    "Professor Baverstock said the Town of Cottesloe's yet to be finalised new town planning scheme was "ethically, morally and legally wrong" because it did not account for climate change.
    Cottesloe mayor Kevin Morgan said the council wanted to ensure that foreshore redevelopment took into account climate change but community opinion on the topic was not at a stage where "we're about to start moving private property"
    ."

    Much talk of "dirty great walls". You can't build a sea wall aroud Australia.

  20. #20
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    the hills
    Posts
    57,649

    Default Re: Building in flood risk areas

    Grandkids will deal, we had our fun.

  21. #21
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    East Quogue,NY
    Posts
    20,544

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Wilkinson View Post
    I built to code and last time I paid flood insurance it was north of 3 k a year which was a subsidized rate. The subsidy was going away which would bring the rate to around 7k and was set to increase yearly to about 10k a year. That is for a lake property that was insuring the structure for about 200k. No way it was worth it at 10k a year..

    Edited to add, the last time I carried flood insurance was 2013 and was notified of changed that were drastically rising rates, it appears that changes were put in place in 2015 that may have made it more affordable. I don't get any updated information on it since I am not actually required to carry it.


    I live 400 feet from the bay, five feet above sea level. I carry flood insurance. It currently runs $3200 per year for $400k coverage and house is probably worth $650-$700.

    It had been under $500 year in 2009. Then we had hurricane Irene. And I had some flooding, and damage of about $35K. Then rates went to about $1,500 year.

    Premiums went up, then Sandy hit and I was flooded again. $60k in damage this time, paid for promptly I might add. Then the feds rezoned the flood map. I had been in the second to most risky zone. Now I am in the most risky zone

    The rates went up again. But, I received +\-$100K in claims money, after having paid in about $40k in premiums. I estimate in about ten years, it will be even money.

    Unless I get hit by another storm.

    Kevin


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
    There are two kinds of boaters: those who have run aground, and those who lie about it.

  22. #22
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    victoria, australia. (1 address now)
    Posts
    62,458

    Default Re: Building in flood risk areas

    We carry fire insurance, a bushfire passed less than a 1000 meters away last year. One small windshift and a lot of fire resources away. The house itself is a cheap one, easily replaced. The value is in the garden, the birds, and the general environment, and some of the contents of our big gallery/studio/boatshop/ garage.
    But if we wished to live in a bare paddock we would have bought one rather than native bush.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •