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Thread: Can paint be avoided on a larch clinker?

  1. #1
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    Default Can paint be avoided on a larch clinker?

    Hello,

    I recently had an 18ft clinker built for fresh water use and I was hoping to maintain the natural wooden look by using some combination of oils and sealers. She has larch planking and oak ribs, and I'd rather not hide the grain under paint. I'm a novice in this regard, and so far I have found the following:


    1. There are plenty of oils and UV-resistant varnishes for above the waterline.
    2. Varnishes are not designed for continual use BELOW the waterline (sometimes this is in the finer print).
    3. Oils such as Deksolje D1 are designed for use below the waterline, but must be over coated with a varnish (such as D2), which can only withstand temporary submersion.


    My boat will remain in water for 4 or 5 months each year. I don't have a boat house, so I will partially sink the boat at a small quay to protect her from the sun and keep the timbers swollen. This practice would however appear to present a challenge in treating the hull with anything other than an anti-fouling paint.

    I'd be grateful for any pointers/ideas please. It would be nice to be able to apply just one type of coating to the entire boat, while preserving the timber and maintaining a stained appearance.

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Can paint be avoided on a larch clinker?

    Rather than give you information that would not, necessarily apply to your case, you might seek local knowledge in your area. Taking care of a boat is a lot like taking care of a woman! How long would she stick with you if you did not give her proper care?
    You are wise to seek information before it is needed. I would lean toward Varnish or paint myself. Antifouling is a must in salt water.
    Jay

  3. #3
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    Default Re: Can paint be avoided on a larch clinker?

    Boat soup, above WL. Paint + AF below.

  4. #4
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    Default Re: Can paint be avoided on a larch clinker?

    I am not a fan of "boat soup" ... my wife says it is almost impossible to get that smelly black sticky sh!t out of my white flannels.

    I use a lot of DO #1
    https://www.igoe.ie/shop/58/owatrol_deks_olje_d1/

  5. #5
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    Default Re: Can paint be avoided on a larch clinker?

    Deks Olje 1 & 2 or varnish above the WL Paint below and under the floor boards.

    Boat soup will turn the wood black in time, melts & rises to the surface and gets really sticky in hot sunny weather, and was developed for boats that hauled out overnight, rather than kept permanently afloat.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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  6. #6
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    Default Re: Can paint be avoided on a larch clinker?

    I don't believe that partial submersion is necessary, or helpful. The planks above the water will do just fine air dry. A canvas cover (or sunbrella, etc) will protect the boat from sunlight. I use Letonkinios, which looks like varnish but acts like oil.

  7. #7
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    Default Re: Can paint be avoided on a larch clinker?

    Take Jays advice and ask around.

  8. #8
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    Default Re: Can paint be avoided on a larch clinker?

    Many thanks to all for your responses. It is difficult to enquire locally these days because most people have long moved to fibreglass boats because of the low maintenance. The last person I knew who owned a wooden clinker simply painted her, in the earlier years using red lead on the hull. One or two others have recommended International Varnish, but the small print states above waterline use only.

    I enquired further with Owatrol, and they helpfully explained that their Deks Olje D1 is porous and its makeup is such that permanent water immersion is not possible. They further explained that D2 may be used below the waterline BUT only where the boat is pulled out of the water after each use.

    I suppose a compromise is to paint the hull and stain the rest as lupussonic suggested. I hadn't heard John's suggestion of Le Tonkinios before, but it sounds promising based on some internet searches, being also apparently good for under water according to this link: https://www.letonkinoisvarnish.co.uk/varfaq.html. I am now considering a combination of Deks Olje 1 overcoated with Le Tonkinios.

  9. #9

    Default Re: Can paint be avoided on a larch clinker?

    This larch faering was done with raw linseed and 1 part to ten real pine tar bought here
    http://www.solventfreepaint.com/viking-sales.htmA87BAB88-4578-483E-A80E-0FD25EAD289D.jpg
    ( no relation to me). Applied hot; raw oil takes longer to dry but penetrates deeper, per site above. put 3-4 coates on first year, about 2 g. Took maybe three weeks to dry. The second year did only dry spots, took less than a quart. third year (now)about a pint. Looks like new, easy to care for. No problem with water immersion since the wood is saturated.

  10. #10
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    Default Re: Can paint be avoided on a larch clinker?

    You might check out the Corwall pilot gigs. They are clinker built of elm and some of them are over a hundred years old and still racing.
    https://www.cpga.co.uk/
    Jay
    Last edited by Jay Greer; 08-01-2019 at 01:35 PM.

  11. #11
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    Default Re: Can paint be avoided on a larch clinker?

    "My boat will remain in water for 4 or 5 months each year. I don't have a boat house, so I will partially sink the boat at a small quay to protect her from the sun and keep the timbers swollen. This practice would however appear to present a challenge in treating the hull with anything other than an anti-fouling paint."

    It will also present a challenge to using the boat. You'll end up with a boat full of stinking algae, slime, mud, and crud, to no good purpose whatsoever. If you don't believe me, take a piece of wood and tie a line to it and hang it off a dock with a weight on it. Check it out once a week. You'll see what I mean.

  12. #12
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    Default Re: Can paint be avoided on a larch clinker?

    Quote Originally Posted by chohm View Post
    This larch faering was done with raw linseed and 1 part to ten real pine tar bought here
    http://www.solventfreepaint.com/viking-sales.htmA87BAB88-4578-483E-A80E-0FD25EAD289D.jpg
    ( no relation to me). Applied hot; raw oil takes longer to dry but penetrates deeper, per site above. put 3-4 coates on first year, about 2 g. Took maybe three weeks to dry. The second year did only dry spots, took less than a quart. third year (now)about a pint. Looks like new, easy to care for. No problem with water immersion since the wood is saturated.
    Nice fourern.
    Give it another ten years and get back to us.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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  13. #13
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    Default Re: Can paint be avoided on a larch clinker?

    Quote Originally Posted by chohm View Post
    This larch faering was done with raw linseed and 1 part to ten real pine tar bought here
    http://www.solventfreepaint.com/viking-sales.htmA87BAB88-4578-483E-A80E-0FD25EAD289D.jpg
    ( no relation to me). Applied hot; raw oil takes longer to dry but penetrates deeper, per site above. put 3-4 coates on first year, about 2 g. Took maybe three weeks to dry. The second year did only dry spots, took less than a quart. third year (now)about a pint. Looks like new, easy to care for. No problem with water immersion since the wood is saturated.
    That's the traditional way to do it over here. The proportions between tar and oil can vary a bit though. Most people theese days will say equal amounts of tar, oil and turps, though I'm sceptical of the meaning with adding solvents myself.
    It was also common in some places to sink the boat completely during winter and do the treatment with oil and/or tar in the summer.

    /Mats

    Elected Swedish Yourneyman of the Year 2019

  14. #14
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    Default Re: Can paint be avoided on a larch clinker?

    Nice faering Chohm. That's another treatment to consider.

    As Mohsart said, I knew of people who also sank their clinkers over the winter, taking them up to paint (but not stain or oil) them in the summer.

    I've always heard and read how when first using a clinker after a period out of water, the timber must 'take up' water to swell and therefore create a seal between the planks. I'm not sure how the various treatments affect this action. On one hand, if the treatment stops water absorption, does it swell the wood instead? One the other hand, if it allows water take up, is it any good? Even the moisture content in the wood must be important before applying a new treatment.
    Last edited by RovingJAH; 08-06-2019 at 03:10 PM.

  15. #15
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    Default Re: Can paint be avoided on a larch clinker?

    Quote Originally Posted by mohsart View Post
    That's the traditional way to do it over here. The proportions between tar and oil can vary a bit though. Most people theese days will say equal amounts of tar, oil and turps, though I'm sceptical of the meaning with adding solvents myself.
    It was also common in some places to sink the boat completely during winter and do the treatment with oil and/or tar in the summer.

    /Mats
    I think that the turps will be real distilled trees, rather than the white spirit called turps substitute. More than just a solvent.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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  16. #16
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    Default Re: Can paint be avoided on a larch clinker?

    Quote Originally Posted by Peerie Maa View Post
    I think that the turps will be real distilled trees, rather than the white spirit called turps substitute. More than just a solvent.
    That may be true, when I say turps I mean what we call balsamterpentin, it may not be the same product as what you mean by turps. Balsamterpentin (lit. Balsamic Turpentine) is made from Pine wood, I'm not sure of the process how it's made and I don't know of any other properties than being a solvent it may have.

    /Mats

    Elected Swedish Yourneyman of the Year 2019

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