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Thread: I should build what I want, not buy it.

  1. #1
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    Default I should build what I want, not buy it.

    After months of looking, reading, and poking around I've come to the conclusion that if I want a boat that ticks all my marks I am going to have to build it myself.

    • Able to sleep 2.5 people in relative comfort.
    • easily trailerable by either of our SUV's (max tow capacity of 3500 for my Montero).
    • Able to be beached.
    • Can hold a small outboard.
    • A relatively simple build that my son, wife, father, mother, and I can enjoy together.
    • Good performance in the Salish Sea.
    • More than one mast!


    One of the biggest factors in finalizing the list was all the pictures, videos, and recounts of the inaugural Salish 100. My wife and I agreed that this is an event we want to participate in.

    There are plenty of little pocket cruisers for sale around that we could buy and enter the event, but that leaves out the important part of building something with 3 generations of family. We moved to the PNW to be near the sea and mountains. What better heirloom than a beautiful boat made from trees that grow on the slopes of the Cascades and sails the Salish?

    There is also the fact that my father is set to retire for the 3rd time. He needs a "hobby" to keep him occupied so he doesn't get bored and go back to work. I've planted the seed and watered it. Now I'm just waiting for him to come up with the idea himself.

    As for our woodworking skills, well... What skills? I have turned several boxes of sticks in to flying contraptions controlled from the ground. But those all fit on a small work bench and had very few complex curves that werent created by shrinking covering over frames. My fiberglass experience consisted of a few wing joints. My father has built a couple very elaborate decks purely from ideas in his head. My wife and mother know how to sand. My 4 year plays with wooden Brio railroad tracks.

    My shortlist of boats consisted of the Glen-L Minuet, Welsford Navigator, and Welsford Sweet Pea. Wanting a yawl rig disqualified the Minuet. I ultimately decided on the Sweet Pea for two reasons; 1. The hull will be slightly simpler due to having only 2 chines per side and 2. It was designed to have a cabin from the outset.

    So now I sit staring at the study plans every night waiting for my father to come to me with his idea. Then we will purchase plans from John and get to building. I hope to be able to share the experience with you all.

  2. #2
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    Default Re: I should build what I want, not buy it.

    Have fun with the build!
    David G
    Harbor Woodworks
    https://www.facebook.com/HarborWoodworks/

    "It was a Sunday morning and Goddard gave thanks that there were still places where one could worship in temples not made by human hands." -- L. F. Herreshoff (The Compleat Cruiser)

  3. #3
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    Default Re: I should build what I want, not buy it.

    "Able to sleep 2.5 people in relative comfort."
    This doesn't mean much.
    I've spent several nights in a one person tent of about one meter width with my then girlfriend and it was comfortable.
    When I was young I most often slept in the same bunk as my father and it was always quite comfortabe.
    But if you are talking about people not comfortable with sleeping next to each others it calls for separate bunks, perhaps the bunks shouldn't even be next to each other.

    /Mats

  4. #4
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    Default Re: I should build what I want, not buy it.

    Quote Originally Posted by mohsart View Post
    "Able to sleep 2.5 people in relative comfort."
    This doesn't mean much.
    I've spent several nights in a one person tent of about one meter width with my then girlfriend and it was comfortable.
    When I was young I most often slept in the same bunk as my father and it was always quite comfortabe.
    But if you are talking about people not comfortable with sleeping next to each others it calls for separate bunks, perhaps the bunks shouldn't even be next to each other.

    /Mats
    'Relative' being the operative word. I have the ability to sleep anywhere, at any time. When I camp I am either hanging in a hammock or in a bivvy. I plan on making a nice boom tent for the cockpit which will give me more than enough room for a solid night of sleep. That gives the cabin to my wife and kid.

    This is also why I want a beachable boat. If we find a hospitable beach we can have a small fire to cook over and I will find a spot to hang my hammock.

  5. #5
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    Default Re: I should build what I want, not buy it.

    Always wondered why one doesn't see more use of hammocks on beach cruiser types. Would have thunk it was relatively easy to rig a crosstree near base of mast, and have an X frame wedged into the transom that would keep up a pair of hammocks, just high enough for wet and uneven floors to no longer be a concern. Or just mast to rudder post if solo maybe. Even some rather cramped and contorted vee berths in cuddies which seem to have the centerboard case designed to be a chaperone and other oddities, I look at them and think, you know what, I'd rather sling a hammock in there and have my nose 6" off the ceiling... probably a good way of getting a week or twos cruising supplies in a weekender cuddy too, leave cushions at home, totes on the bunks, hammock over.
    2019: returning from being sidelined with medical probs, crossing fingers worst is over, still in "armchair enthusiast" mode for time being.

  6. #6
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    Default Re: I should build what I want, not buy it.

    I'd wonder if an open boat like Don Kurylko's Myst with a boom tent would give more comfort and space.
    that little cabin looks like its taking up room rather than creating a livable area.

    says me at 6ft 4" ��
    It's all fun and games until Darth Vader comes.

  7. #7
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    Default Re: I should build what I want, not buy it.

    I'd wonder if an open boat like Don Kurylko's Myst with a boom tent would give more comfort and space.
    that little cabin looks like its taking up room rather than creating a livable area.

    says me at 6ft 4" 😀

    Best of luck!
    It's all fun and games until Darth Vader comes.

  8. #8
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    Default Re: I should build what I want, not buy it.

    I'd wonder if an open boat like Don Kurylko's Myst with a boom tent would give more comfort and space.
    that little cabin looks like its taking up room rather than creating a livable area.

    says me at 6ft 4" 😀
    It's all fun and games until Darth Vader comes.

  9. #9
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    Default Re: I should build what I want, not buy it.

    I can foresee two problems with trying to hang a hammock in/on a small boat.

    The first is room. I need a minimum of 13 feet between anchor points to get the right "hang" so I don't sleep like a banana. Add 4 vertical feet and 4 feet in width. A hammock takes up a lot of real estate with a bunch of dead space.

    The second is tension forces. When I am in my hammock there is nearly 300 lbs of lateral load on each anchor point trying to pull them together.

    I'm 5'9, the wife is 5'7, the 4 year old is knee high to a grasshopper. This cabin has plenty of room. I think. If it doesn't that is just an excuse to build another boat.

  10. #10
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    Default Re: I should build what I want, not buy it.

    Chebacco does a lot of what the OP requested, including being beachable.
    Quote Originally Posted by James McMullen View Post
    Yeadon is right, of course.

  11. #11
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    Default Re: I should build what I want, not buy it.

    There's no question at all that you will soon want a bigger boat. That is just what happens.

  12. #12
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    Default Re: I should build what I want, not buy it.

    Rodger Martinís Presto 30 is pretty close to your brief. Itís a very well thought-out design.

  13. #13
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    Default Re: I should build what I want, not buy it.

    The Welsford Sweet Pea is a nice boat--a reasonably roomy 2-bunk interior from what I recall. It's a very big 17-footer, easily beachable, yawl rig. I'd say a good choice given your original priorities. I quite enjoyed the one I had the chance to sail.

    Tom
    You don't have to be prepared as long as you're willing to suffer the consequences.

    www.tompamperin.com

  14. #14
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    Default Re: I should build what I want, not buy it.

    Hammocks don't work well in small boats because of the ratio of mass of the boat to the occupant. As the boat rolls, the sleeper will start to oscillate and as they are likely at or above the metacenter the system will quickly get out of phase, amplify, and you will be very uncomfortable, possibly even wet. Sleeping in a hammock down below on a deep heavy keel boat is much better, and still nobody does that.

  15. #15
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    Default Re: I should build what I want, not buy it.

    Quote Originally Posted by WI-Tom View Post
    The Welsford Sweet Pea is a nice boat--a reasonably roomy 2-bunk interior from what I recall. It's a very big 17-footer, easily beachable, yawl rig. I'd say a good choice given your original priorities. I quite enjoyed the one I had the chance to sail.

    Tom
    https://smallboatsmonthly.com/articl...rds-sweet-pea/
    Quote Originally Posted by James McMullen View Post
    Yeadon is right, of course.

  16. #16
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    Default Re: I should build what I want, not buy it.

    Vivier's "Jewell" hits a number of your items too. As does my Eun Mara, though having been out teaching my adult daughter to sail in her a bit this summer I'd say while the EM has a reasonably comfortable two-person cockpit that would fill up fast with any more. The trade-off is accommodations.
    Steve

    Boats, like whiskey, are all good.
    R.D Culler

  17. #17
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    Default Re: I should build what I want, not buy it.

    Seriously - BUY THE BOAT you want.

    it is far cheaper to buy the boat you want. It is ready soon or even now. It is registered. It will make the builder or owner who has it happy. You will be able to tell how much you like this. Also if you want a project, they are easily available, fits exactly what you want. Can be visually pictured for modification after you get to know her. There is tremendous satisfaction in a rebuild or restoration.

    Time is short. You are young. You have much better things to do while you have the energy and limited time being full of life. Your wife will be happier with this decision as you will not give up the most precious life moments to sawdust, epoxy and paint. Build a boat later after you figure stuff out, your own family grown and you want to get sentimental. This is good wisdom as many will tell you.

    i would even suggest visiting the center for wooden boats and ask if there is a boat that fits your desired description. I am sure there is one there if not one connection away for nearly nothing at all or for the price of the trailer.
    Last edited by Ted Hoppe; 07-30-2019 at 03:28 PM.

  18. #18
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    Default Re: I should build what I want, not buy it.

    After restoring a Macgregor 25, selling it, buying a Columbia 26 MKII (almost finished with restoring, 2 thru-hulls to install and bottom paint just before splash time), I want to BUILD a WOOD boat.

    Vivier's Jewell was in my top 5.

    One of my big reasons for choosing a Welsford design is how active he is on social media. If I have a very specific question about the design, who better to get an answer from than the designer?

    And I'm not worried about trailers. I'm far more experienced and handy with a welder and chop saw than I am at shaping wood. Building a few racecars and being the lead mechanic on an IMSA pit crew taught me all that.

  19. #19
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    Default Re: I should build what I want, not buy it.

    Quote Originally Posted by Ted Hoppe View Post
    Seriously - BUY THE BOAT you want.

    it is far cheaper to buy the boat you want. It is ready soon or even now. It is registered. It will make the builder or owner who has it happy. You will be able to tell how much you like this. Also if you want a project, they are easily available, fits exactly what you want. Can be visually pictured for modification after you get to know her. There is tremendous satisfaction in a rebuild or restoration.

    Time is short. You are young. You have much better things to do while you have the energy and limited time being full of life. Your wife will be happier with this decision as you will not give up the most precious life moments to sawdust, epoxy and paint. Build a boat later after you figure stuff out, your own family grown and you want to get sentimental. This is good wisdom as many will tell you.

    i would even suggest visiting the center for wooden boats and ask if there is a boat that fits your desired description. I am sure there is one there if not one connection away for nearly nothing at all or for the price of the trailer.
    Great advice Ted!!!..........however most people will not listen. Might as well tell them to buy a plastic boat as well to save time and money.

  20. #20
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    Default Re: I should build what I want, not buy it.

    I'll say it louder for those in the back:

    I HAVE ALREADY BOUGHT A BIG PLASTIC BOAT.

    Still have it. Not getting rid of it. I want a different, smaller boat to go with it.

    Right now I only have 4 different water-born vessels. 3 cars. 2 motorcycles. And a hopped up riding lawnmower.

    I have always bought things that were old and broken then fixed them. I want to build something brand new this time around. I'm not worried about the time or expense.

  21. #21
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    Default Re: I should build what I want, not buy it.

    OK cool, check your marbles in with the coat attendant and make sawdust.
    2019: returning from being sidelined with medical probs, crossing fingers worst is over, still in "armchair enthusiast" mode for time being.

  22. #22
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    Default Re: I should build what I want, not buy it.

    Quote Originally Posted by SeanM26 View Post
    What better heirloom than a beautiful boat made from trees that grow on the slopes of the Cascades and sails the Salish?
    One of the many benefits of strip-planked builds. [sigh]

    ALASKA.jpg

  23. #23
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    Default Re: I should build what I want, not buy it.

    Quote Originally Posted by darroch View Post
    One of the many benefits of strip-planked builds. [sigh]

    ALASKA.jpg
    I never said I was only going to build just one. Just that the Sweet Pea will be the first one.

    Like said above, I'm young. Plenty of time to keep making mistakes called boats.

  24. #24
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    Default Re: I should build what I want, not buy it.

    Quote Originally Posted by SeanM26 View Post
    I never said I was only going to build just one. Just that the Sweet Pea will be the first one.

    Like said above, I'm young. Plenty of time to keep making mistakes called boats.

    Sounds to me like you've got your head screwed on right. Have a great time building. Careful, it can be addictive!

    Jeff

  25. #25
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    Default Re: I should build what I want, not buy it.

    I consider boat building to be just one long project from which many boats will be born.
    Quote Originally Posted by James McMullen View Post
    Yeadon is right, of course.

  26. #26
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    Default Re: I should build what I want, not buy it.

    Quote Originally Posted by Yeadon View Post
    I consider boat building to be just one long project from which many boats will be born.
    Truth

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