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Thread: Peerie Maa, 40 years on.

  1. #36
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    Default Re: Peerie Maa, 40 years on.

    123
    Last edited by Chippie; 07-20-2019 at 10:12 AM.

  2. #37
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    Default Re: Peerie Maa, 40 years on.



    Can we come back onto an even keel so I can ask "what are these "splines" to which you refer. I have used them to add strength to a mitred corner for instance, but cannot see how the can be of use in repairs being mentioned?

  3. #38
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    Default Re: Peerie Maa, 40 years on.

    Quote Originally Posted by Chippie View Post


    Can we come back onto an even keel so I can ask "what are these "splines" to which you refer. I have used them to add strength to a mitred corner for instance, but cannot see how the can be of use in repairs being mentioned?
    See my post #36 above.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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  4. #39
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    Default Re: Peerie Maa, 40 years on.

    Thanks for the update.

  5. #40
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    Default Re: Peerie Maa, 40 years on.

    That is a beautiful boat. Unlike others, it doesn't look neglected to me. It looks well loved and enjoyed. It is hard to enjoy a boat when you can't use it.

  6. #41
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    Default Re: Peerie Maa, 40 years on.

    No piccies today. I sanded every inch of the outside, so there was lots of dust.
    I dry fitted the outboard bracket that we used to have on her when Duncan and I used her for fishing, and have spot primed all of the wood that emerged during the sanding.
    So there will be pictures tomorrow before I start work on cleaning out and sanding the inside.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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  7. #42
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    Default Re: Peerie Maa, 40 years on.

    Hi Nick, it appears that I have the same kind of split in my boat that you have advised to place in a spline just like you are doing. On question, what kind of glue? Epoxy or type III yellow or gflex epoxy?

  8. #43
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    Default Re: Peerie Maa, 40 years on.

    Quote Originally Posted by tomwil View Post
    Hi Nick, it appears that I have the same kind of split in my boat that you have advised to place in a spline just like you are doing. On question, what kind of glue? Epoxy or type III yellow or gflex epoxy?
    I am Just using bog standard thickened epoxy. I am aiming at thin glue lines so I do noy think that there is much room for Gflex to flex.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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  9. #44
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    Default Re: Peerie Maa, 40 years on.

    OK, pictures as promised.
    A couple of better shots of a completed spline, this one was fitted from the inside.
    P1060433.jpgP1060434.jpg
    This one shows why I went for skinny splines fitted to the cleaned out crack, rather than routing the crack open and fitting a thicker spline.

    The outboard bracket.
    First off I fitted an extra top timber to spread the loads into more planks.

    P1060427 (2).jpg

    The bracket itself was salvaged from a ply boat rotting into the turf on a cliff top. Peerie is the second of my boats to carry it.
    P1060428.jpgP1060429.jpg
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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  10. #45
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    Default Re: Peerie Maa, 40 years on.

    All of the spot priming is complete, and the internal sanding is done, followed by the first white undercoat.
    P1060430.jpgP1060432.jpgP1060435.jpg
    Next undercoating on the inside, followed by the blue topsides. Then around again with a light sanding and a second undercoat.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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  11. #46
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    Default Re: Peerie Maa, 40 years on.

    40 years! Longer than most marriages.

    I love boat that look like they are used.

    Kenny
    Almost everything about boats involves so much more time and money than one anticipates that rational and accurate planning will deter even starting. Ian McColgin

  12. #47
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    Default Re: Peerie Maa, 40 years on.

    I am starting the less entertaining bit, spreading on two coats of three different coloured gloss. So I'll not bore you all with many pictures until I get to more interesting stuff involving screwdrivers and so on.
    Meanwhile, marking the line between the rubbing strip (white) and the rest of the gunwale (blue), a small thing but mine own.
    DSC03584.jpgDSC03585.jpg

    And one last general view with the first undercoat spot painted over all of the blotches of primer.
    DSC03586.jpg
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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  13. #48
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    Default Re: Peerie Maa, 40 years on.

    Looking sweet Nick.

  14. #49
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    Default Re: Peerie Maa, 40 years on.

    Quote Originally Posted by lupussonic View Post
    Looking sweet Nick.
    Thanks, she is getting there.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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  15. #50
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    Default Re: Peerie Maa, 40 years on.

    Gloss coat finished and all of the bits screwed back on, so the next job it to pull her out of the workshop, put all of the loose bits back and sort the rig.

    The name and number boards ready to go back on. I am mot happy with th painted boards, they have been retouched once too often, so i will take them off and sand them right back at my leisure.
    P1060436.jpg

    The upper captive pintle. We need one of our scandiwegian friends to give us the correct Old Norse name for it.
    P1060437.jpg

    The lower pintle, a nice bronze casting with a SL part number cast in.
    P1060438.jpg

    Carved name board and outbord bracket fitted.
    P1060440.jpg

    Name and number boards installed forward.
    P1060443.jpg
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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  16. #51
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    Default Re: Peerie Maa, 40 years on.

    Quote Originally Posted by Peerie Maa View Post
    The split in this plank has been opened out to a constant width to take a spline glued in.


    The splits I have splined do not suit that method, so I have cleaned the edges of the splits back to clean wood and planed the splines to fit the cracks. As they were narrow the splines bent around the curves in the splits.
    I was misled by "spline" I would have called it "insert".
    I take it that that particular repair is not subject to constant water pressure i.e. below the water line if it is only secured with "Glupe"?

  17. #52
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    Default Re: Peerie Maa, 40 years on.

    Quote Originally Posted by Chippie View Post
    I was misled by "spline" I would have called it "insert".
    I take it that that particular repair is not subject to constant water pressure i.e. below the water line if it is only secured with "Glupe"?
    The epoxy glue available nowadays is stronger than the wood. Strip planked boats are now built using only glue without any mechanical fastenings.
    It is a bit academic anyway, as most of the splits on Peerie Maa are doubled with plank stuff clenched over the split on the inside of the plank, in the traditional Shetland fashion.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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  18. #53
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    Default Re: Peerie Maa, 40 years on.

    Thanks.
    I appreciate that that adhesives are superior to the older type glues but I rarely used them as I left hands on boat building almost 50 yrs ago. I usually cringe when people mention "Glupe" as they often indicate "or I suspect" that they are using it as a "filler". I soon found that in most of the jobs I tackled Scotch glue accepted French polish whereas they don't.

    Having said that I was laying canvas several years back, and I had left my 3ft folding wooden rule open atop of it, unthinkingly I pushed the roll back and it snapped across an area only about 3/4" I used a modern glue and clamped them together.

    It's still going strong old glues wouldn't have done that.

  19. #54
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    Default Re: Peerie Maa, 40 years on.

    Quote Originally Posted by Chippie View Post
    Thanks.
    I appreciate that that adhesives are superior to the older type glues but I rarely used them as I left hands on boat building almost 50 yrs ago. I usually cringe when people mention "Glupe" as they often indicate "or I suspect" that they are using it as a "filler". I soon found that in most of the jobs I tackled Scotch glue accepted French polish whereas they don't.

    Having said that I was laying canvas several years back, and I had left my 3ft folding wooden rule open atop of it, unthinkingly I pushed the roll back and it snapped across an area only about 3/4" I used a modern glue and clamped them together.

    It's still going strong old glues wouldn't have done that.
    Just so.
    You might be familiar with resorcinol, marketed as Cascophen. It required fine glue lines and is not gap filling but produces a strong WBP adhesive, I believe that it is the purple coloured glue used in laminating marine grade ply.

    The joy of epoxy is that it likes crappy joinery, it is gap filling and too tight a fit or too much clamping pressure will cause glue starved joints. That is why it is popular with less skilled amateurs. It can also create strong fillets in joining ply, so replacing the polyester and GRP tape used on all those Mirror dinghy's.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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  20. #55
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    Default Re: Peerie Maa, 40 years on.

    This reminds me Iím refreshing the duck punt. Iím getting a proper sail this year, I hope.

    No, I still havenít a gun, yet. Too much nonsense with an electric pump. I have to suss out a manual pump of some kind...

    Peace,
    Robert

  21. #56
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    Default Re: Peerie Maa, 40 years on.

    Quote Originally Posted by amish rob View Post
    This reminds me Iím refreshing the duck punt. Iím getting a proper sail this year, I hope.

    No, I still havenít a gun, yet. Too much nonsense with an electric pump. I have to suss out a manual pump of some kind...

    Peace,
    Robert
    Should be OK if you can pump up pressure in a reservoir.
    The force pump

    Physics Assignment Help Online

    in Application of atmospheric and liquid pressure /
    The force pump
    For raising water to a height of more than 10 m, the force pump is used (Fig. 11.3). It consists of a pump with a solid plunger and foot valve B, connected by a pipe to a chamber C through a valve A.

    The upstroke (Fig. 11.3 (a))

    On the upstroke valve A closes and the atmospheric pressure pushes water up into the pump through valve B. The downstroke (Fig. 11.3 (b))
    On the down stroke, valve B closes and water is forced into the chamber C through valve A by the pressure due Ďto the mechanical force exerted on the plunger. The exit pipe P projects into the chamber C so that some air becomes trapped at the top of the chamber. This is compressed and acts as a cushion, thus preventing a sudden jolt to the pump when the water column in P falls slightly and sharply closes valve A at the beginning of the upstroke. C also helps to expel water on the upstroke.

    The maximum height to which water may be raised by this means depends on: (a) The force which is exerted on the plunger during the down stroke.
    (b) The ability of the pump and its working parts to withstand the pressure of the long column of water in the exit pipe P.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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  22. #57
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    Default Re: Peerie Maa, 40 years on.

    It must needs be much more simple than that. And cheap. I do need a new sail, and donít really want a flogged to death one, so I actually have to spend money.

    Which angers me no end.

    One reason the punt will be green this time. And, I mean GREEN! Yikes. Still. $9 is $9...

    Peace,
    Polyurethane Porch And Floor, If You Wondered

  23. #58
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    Default Re: Peerie Maa, 40 years on.

    Quote Originally Posted by amish rob View Post
    I do need a new sail, and don’t really want a flogged to death one, so I actually have to spend money.

    Which angers me no end.

    One reason the punt will be green this time. And, I mean GREEN! Yikes. Still. $9 is $9...

    Peace,
    Polyurethane Porch And Floor, If You Wondered
    If you have the time and a robust sewing machine, an end of roll of sail cloth is the cheapest way I know to get a new sail.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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  24. #59
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    Default Re: Peerie Maa, 40 years on.

    Quote Originally Posted by Peerie Maa View Post
    If you have the time and a robust sewing machine, an end of roll of sail cloth is the cheapest way I know to get a new sail.
    Yeah. I want a good sail, for once.

    Peace,
    Robert

  25. #60
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    Default Re: Peerie Maa, 40 years on.

    There are a couple of good books to be borrowed from your library, and Todd Bradshaw has shared a lot of advice on here. It is doable, just takes a bit of time.

    But then that is life. Time = money. Money = time. Entirely your decision based on your desires and priorities.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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  26. #61
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    Default Re: Peerie Maa, 40 years on.

    Quote Originally Posted by Peerie Maa View Post
    There are a couple of good books to be borrowed from your library, and Todd Bradshaw has shared a lot of advice on here. It is doable, just takes a bit of time.

    But then that is life. Time = money. Money = time. Entirely your decision based on your desires and priorities.

    And, weíre done.

    Peace,
    Robert

  27. #62
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    Default Re: Peerie Maa, 40 years on.

    Nick, our references to modern glues sprang to mind when Jim presents this on the Bilge in case you miss it. The old glues wouldn't have worked in this instance?

    http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthre...guy-make-stuff

  28. #63
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    Default Re: Peerie Maa, 40 years on.

    Don't see why not. It is not as if he is going to leave that model out in a rain storm, let alone launch it into the oggin.
    It was damp that makes casein and hide glues fail in a marine environment.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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  29. #64
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    Default Re: Peerie Maa, 40 years on.

    A tad blunt Nick, but point taken.

    If you let the video run I is subject to outdoor "trials" though.

  30. #65
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    Default Re: Peerie Maa, 40 years on.

    I think Nick needs to update his sig to read "A tad blunt Nick, but point taken."
    - Chris

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  31. #66
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    Default Re: Peerie Maa, 40 years on.

    Quote Originally Posted by cstevens View Post
    I think Nick needs to update his sig to read "A tad blunt Nick, but point taken."
    Chippy is a time served shipwright from the NE. Chippy will be used to and unfazed by blunt.
    Mind you on the scale of 1 to 10 for bluntness, that was in the low numbers.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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