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Thread: quick question about boat naming

  1. #1
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    Default quick question about boat naming

    I was told once, quite a few years ago, that the first boat built to a design should be named the design. Is this correct?

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    Default Re: quick question about boat naming

    In my opinion, that is not correct.

    Jeff

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    Default Re: quick question about boat naming

    Quote Originally Posted by peb View Post
    I was told once, quite a few years ago, that the first boat built to a design should be named the design. Is this correct?
    I always thought it was the other way around. That the name for a class of boats is taken from the name of the first of that design. Or at least that's the case for naval vessels. I don't know if it really applies to recreational boats. Off the top of my head I can't think of any that follow that pattern. Mostly the class names seem to reflect the place of origin ("Dark Harbor 20") or the manufacturer ("Blanchard Standard Cruiser") or perhaps both ("Lake Union Dreamboat" - which was built on Lake Union by Lake Union Drydock).

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    Default Re: quick question about boat naming

    Quote Originally Posted by cstevens View Post
    I always thought it was the other way around. That the name for a class of boats is taken from the name of the first of that design. Or at least that's the case for naval vessels. I don't know if it really applies to recreational boats. Off the top of my head I can't think of any that follow that pattern. Mostly the class names seem to reflect the place of origin ("Dark Harbor 20") or the manufacturer ("Blanchard Standard Cruiser") or perhaps both ("Lake Union Dreamboat" - which was built on Lake Union by Lake Union Drydock).
    Yes, that would probably be a more accurate as to what I was told. Memory is rather poor about the matter.

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    Default Re: quick question about boat naming

    Somehow, a boat named "MMD2015-04" doesn't have a memorable ring. It just wouldn't sound right when called out three times over the radio.

    Designers can call their designs anything they like, as long as it doesn't challenge another designer's creation's name. Builders can then name their boat anything that they like, unless they have entered into a contract with the designer to call it something specific.
    Hope for the best, but plan for the worst.

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    Default Re: quick question about boat naming

    Quote Originally Posted by mmd View Post
    Somehow, a boat named "MMD2015-04" doesn't have a memorable ring. It just wouldn't sound right when called out three times over the radio.

    Designers can call their designs anything they like, as long as it doesn't challenge another designer's creation's name. Builders can then name their boat anything that they like, unless they have entered into a contract with the designer to call it something specific.
    See now I just want to know what MMD2015-04 was!

  7. #7
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    Default Re: quick question about boat naming

    It was/is a glamorous, sexy, sleek aluminum oyster farm barge complete with hydraulic crane and counter-balancing ballast tanks on the gunwales opposite the crane. Basically, a 28-ft outboard-powered aluminum box.
    Hope for the best, but plan for the worst.

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    Default Re: quick question about boat naming

    Quote Originally Posted by mmd View Post
    It was/is a glamorous, sexy, sleek aluminum oyster farm barge complete with hydraulic crane and counter-balancing ballast tanks on the gunwales opposite the crane. Basically, a 28-ft outboard-powered aluminum box.
    Funny, that's just about exactly what I expected. They don't ever talk about those jobs in the Westlawn brochures do they? It's all mega yachts and racing boats. But it's the oyster barges and harbor tugs that pay the bills I'm sure.

  9. #9
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    Default Re: quick question about boat naming

    No offense meant to anybody who reads this, but yacht clients want full-custom pieces of art described in fanatic detail over twenty drawings and a few lovely full-colour illustrations with a sixty-page design brief for a few thousand bucks, with months of free revisions thrown in. Commercial clients want a boat that works, is cost-effective to build, with enough information for the classification agencies to approve and the builder to get it done, and are willing to accept a reasonable professional fee for the job. And they pay their bills on time.

    Don't get me wrong; I love designing yachts, and a dream client (I have been fortunate enough to have had a few, one of whom posts here regularly) is one who knows what he wants and just needs an NA to create the design package to get it done. I particularly like designing traditional plank-on-frame (or cold-molded) hulls and getting to work closely with the gifted craftsmen who build them, but those commissions are few and far between. I have done eight or nine, I think, in thirty-five years. I have done thirty-some work boats in that time, and countless little engineering tasks such as my most recent - designing, testing and approving a 6-ft x 4-ft watertight flush aluminum deck hatch to meet ABS and ISO standards.
    Last edited by mmd; 07-10-2019 at 05:07 PM.
    Hope for the best, but plan for the worst.

  10. #10
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    Default Re: quick question about boat naming

    Quote Originally Posted by mmd View Post
    Somehow, a boat named "MMD2015-04" doesn't have a memorable ring. It just wouldn't sound right when called out three times over the radio.

    Designers can call their designs anything they like, as long as it doesn't challenge another designer's creation's name. Builders can then name their boat anything that they like, unless they have entered into a contract with the designer to call it something specific.
    Would have thought that the commissioning owner would have had the loudest shout.
    I like the convention used by the Edwardian yacht clubs in my neck of the woods. The jewel class, all named after precious stones, and the Rivers class, my father owned the Dart, the Severn has returned to the place of its birth, and a friend had Deva.
    This is Severn
    Severn.jpg
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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  11. #11
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    Default Re: quick question about boat naming

    Can't wait to see what the MD 20/20 looks like.

  12. #12
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    Default Re: quick question about boat naming

    Chris, many years ago I came across a small workboat that had been built around 1960 in Moose River, Nova Scotia by a elderly boatbuilder. I got the story second-hand, so cannot attest to its accuracy, but it was said that the boat was a replica of one that he and his father built together when he was a young man, which would put the type current to around 1910 - 1920. It has some form and construction features that I have not seen in Nova Scotian boats before. I was able to take the lines off the hull and put them on paper, but the drawing has languished in my files for the past quarter-century. Hopefully sometime in the next year I will find enough time to prepare a full set of building plans for the boat, because I think it would be a lovely boat, especially when rigged with a gaff or sprit sail. Would anybody like to be the guinea pig... errr... first-time builder? I will donate the plans and provide builder support to the first builder in exchange for lots of photos of the build and finished product.

    Moose River Wherry stern quarter.jpg

    Moose River Wherry bow quarter.jpg
    Hope for the best, but plan for the worst.

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    Default Re: quick question about boat naming

    what are her dimensions michael?
    Simpler is better, except when complicated looks really cool.

  14. #14
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    Default Re: quick question about boat naming

    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Pless View Post
    what are her dimensions michael?
    They are pretty from both ends.


    That is probably a 5' bubbly level.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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  15. #15
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    Default Re: quick question about boat naming

    LOA - 15'-2" BOA - 4'-2" D(midships) - 1'-6"

    She has a wide plank keel that allows her to stand upright on her own bottom, and a really tight tuck at the skeg aft. It would not be a build for a first-time builder if done in lapstrake. Easier if done in strip-cold-mold, and I think this would make a pretty boat. The original is rather heavily-built for its type, but I think this is a function of a.) local building methods of the era, and b.) its workboat origin. I will try to make it lighter for recreational use.
    Hope for the best, but plan for the worst.

  16. #16
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    Default Re: quick question about boat naming

    Quote Originally Posted by mmd View Post
    LOA - 15'-2" BOA - 4'-2" D(midships) - 1'-6"

    She has a wide plank keel that allows her to stand upright on her own bottom, and a really tight tuck at the skeg aft. It would not be a build for a first-time builder if done in lapstrake. Easier if done in strip-cold-mold, and I think this would make a pretty boat. The original is rather heavily-built for its type, but I think this is a function of a.) local building methods of the era, and b.) its workboat origin. I will try to make it lighter for recreational use.
    Lighter can equal less stable. I met a couple of young boat-builders in the early days of epoxy who built a clinker pram as a learning exercise. Using glued lap ply they reduced the skin thickness and left out the timbers. She was so light that they had to build a second with flatter floors and wider bottom out to a quicker turn at the bilge to claw back some stability. Thinner plank will also make turning the tuck under the transom harder to do. Less wood to aim the nails at.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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  17. #17
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    Default Re: quick question about boat naming

    Thanks for pointing that out to the folks whom may not know that, Nick. One of the more enjoyable tasks in 'modernizing' traditional designs is to recognize that potential and modifying the design to accommodate it. Many builder/designers that I have met over the past three decades have opined that doing a weight/stability analysis of a small boat is too much effort for too little gain, preferring to 'just do it and it will all work out'. I can't work that way; I'm much too fussy about such details. So I prepare weight estimate spreadsheets and hydrostatics evaluations and other esoteric time-wasters to compare original to new. I believe in getting it right the first time.
    Hope for the best, but plan for the worst.

  18. #18
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    Default Re: quick question about boat naming

    I always enjoy reading here all the rules and superstitions regarding the naming of boats.

  19. #19
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    Default

    I think my boat design, Bluebird of Thorne, is the name of the first of her type built. I can't remember now whether the designer, Arthur Robb, also designed the 2 previous Bluebird of Thorne's, which shared the name, and the fascination with twin keels, but were otherwise quite different boats. But all 3 Bluebirds were designed for the same person, Lord Riverdale. I know there are 3 built to the same design as mine. The first in rivetted iron plate, the second, mine, in timber, and the 3rd in steel and aluminium.

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