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Thread: Help with Greek work boat/caique

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
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    Default Help with Greek work boat/caique

    Hello,

    My family has a small traditional Greek fishing boat (15 foot double ended caique). We had it built by the local boat builder who built it in the traditional manner (semi disposable) out of pine and nails.

    Initially it had a single cylinder inboard engine and while it was very traditional, it was incredibly loud and way too much engine for this little boat. So last year we converted it to a balanced lug and it sails surprisingly well and it is a lot of fun for our family.

    It spends three months in the water during the summer and the rest of the year garaged on a trailer.

    This summer as we were getting ready to put it in the water we noticed this chunk of the aft keel is cracked to the point of almost falling off. We plan on getting it repaired by the builder in the fall, but if we ask him to do it now, it will take him all summer and we won't get to use it this year.

    Looking for advice on a simple repair that will hold us over until the fall when we can get a proper repair done.

    I was thinking to either glue back in the existing chunk with epoxy, or maybe scarf in a new chunk as best I can. I have woodworking experience, but very limited tools here and the only power tool is a drill.



    [IMG][/IMG]


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    Thanks!
    Alex
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Last edited by Alex D; 07-07-2019 at 07:12 AM. Reason: Added Pics

  2. #2
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    Oct 2008
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    Default Re: Help with Greek work boat/caique

    First off reef out all of that cotton, which has actually caused the timber to fracture. Then see where the bolts that should be in there actually are.
    Then when you know what you have got post some more photos. I would think that the fracture can be glued with epoxy, but. When the cotton is all out you may well need to jack the stern up to close the gaps and drive some more bolts to ensure that they stay closed. Pictures with all of the cotton removed will confirm the way forward.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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  3. #3
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    Default Re: Help with Greek work boat/caique

    Thank you!

    How far back ong the seam do you recommend I reef it out?

    Thanks,
    Alex

  4. #4
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    Default Re: Help with Greek work boat/caique

    Quote Originally Posted by Alex D View Post
    Thank you!

    How far back ong the seam do you recommend I reef it out?

    Thanks,
    Alex
    Until you cannot see daylight from one side to the other. Then get back to us with photos.
    Lovely boat by the way.
    If there is no shaft or propeller, she will sail better if you fit blocking to fill in that aperture.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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  5. #5
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    Dec 2009
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    Default Re: Help with Greek work boat/caique

    Thanks for the kind words! She's a fun little boat and sails surprisingly well all things considered. There is no longer a shaft or prop. Filling in the aperture is on the list of winter projects, along with a more permanent fix to this issue.

    I reefed the seam back to the edge of the dovetail. If I go any farther forward, I'll be doing the entire garbord seam. The garbord seam appears to have a similar amount of caulk in it so I anticipate that it will need to be reefed this winter and have the keel bolts tightened up.

    This is where things stand at the moment, port side:

    [IMG][/IMG]

    [IMG][/IMG]

    Starbord side:

    [IMG][/IMG]

    My thoughts are to glue the broken bit back in with thickened epoxy for the summer, put a bit of cotton in the seam, but not as much as last time, and throw it in the water. I don't think that area will lead to much water intrusion and it's not a completely dry boat anyway.

    Then, at the end of August, pull her out of the water, get her to the builder to reef the garbord seams, jack or pull the keel tight and fill the old prop hole.

    Is there anything in that approach that will cause permanent damage?

    I'll also post some pics of her under sail as soon as I dig them up!

    Cheers!
    Alex

  6. #6
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    Default Re: Help with Greek work boat/caique

    Quote Originally Posted by Alex D View Post
    Thanks for the kind words! She's a fun little boat and sails surprisingly well all things considered. There is no longer a shaft or prop. Filling in the aperture is on the list of winter projects, along with a more permanent fix to this issue.

    I reefed the seam back to the edge of the dovetail. If I go any farther forward, I'll be doing the entire garbord seam. The garbord seam appears to have a similar amount of caulk in it so I anticipate that it will need to be reefed this winter and have the keel bolts tightened up.

    This is where things stand at the moment, port side:

    [IMG][/IMG]

    [IMG][/IMG]

    Starbord side:

    [IMG][/IMG]

    My thoughts are to glue the broken bit back in with thickened epoxy for the summer, put a bit of cotton in the seam, but not as much as last time, and throw it in the water. I don't think that area will lead to much water intrusion and it's not a completely dry boat anyway.

    Then, at the end of August, pull her out of the water, get her to the builder to reef the garbord seams, jack or pull the keel tight and fill the old prop hole.

    Is there anything in that approach that will cause permanent damage?

    I'll also post some pics of her under sail as soon as I dig them up!

    Cheers!
    Alex
    Yes do that, except fill the gap between the keel and sternpost with something that will squeeze out. Traditionally that would be a mixture of pitch and tallow. In the US they use a product called slick seam or plumbers wax. Something stiff enough to stay put but not so stiff that it will not squeeze out as the wood swells and she takes up..
    Talk to your boatbuilder about stopwaters when you hand her over for the final fix.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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  7. #7
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    Rockland Maine USA and Woodbridge, Suffolk, England
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    Default Re: Help with Greek work boat/caique

    There really shouldn't be cotton caulking in that sort of join/seam anyway. Cotton or oakum is caulked into the seams betwem the planks. along the garboard seam with the wood keel and up the hood ends (where the planks finish both forward and aft in the rebate in the stem and sternpost.

    Once you get to larger lumps of timber away from the planking, there is no reason to caulk (with cotton or oakum). So basically get rid of any cotton there and glue the bit back with thickened epoxy. Then fill any gaps and joins with a flexible stopper – red lead and grease is the old favourite. International make a red coloured underwater seam sealant that does a good job. And make sure that the various bits are well fastened together.

    And as Nick says fill in the old prop aperture to improve sailing performance.

    If you do reef out the caulking along the garboard seam, make sure that the plank fastenings are good – harden up or refasten if necessary before re-caulking. Caulking is like a wedge driven between the planks to keep them held tightly together – but it only works if the fastenings are good – otherwise it will just drive the planks off the frames. The stopping (red lead putty or whatever) in the seams over the caulking is simply what stops the water coming in.

    Cheers -- George
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    A C Grayling

  8. #8
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    Dec 2009
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    Default Re: Help with Greek work boat/caique

    Thank you gents! The chunk is glued back in and I am trying to find a suitable squishy material to chuck in the gap and then into the water she goes!

    Thanks for all the help!

    Cheers,
    Alex

  9. #9
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    Default Re: Help with Greek work boat/caique

    Quote Originally Posted by Alex D View Post
    Thank you gents! The chunk is glued back in and I am trying to find a suitable squishy material to chuck in the gap and then into the water she goes!

    Thanks for all the help!

    Cheers,
    Alex
    If you sail in salt water household soap will do. It does not dissolve in brine. Just soften it by soaking in water until it can be knifed in. Might need a couple of bars though.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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