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Thread: Treasure Island-untold story-great grandfather of Robert Louis Stevenson & Owen Lloyd

  1. #1
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    Lightbulb Treasure Island-untold story-great grandfather of Robert Louis Stevenson & Owen Lloyd

    Since I am in St.Kitts I found this particularly interesting:

    Alan Stevenson, the great grandfather of Robert Louis Stevenson was buried in St. George’s Episcopal Church in Basseterre, St. Kitts. in 1774. Also buried here is an Elizabeth Lloyd who died in 1759, possibly the daughter of Owen Lloyd.

    http://www.treasureislandtheuntoldst...-BythEMXB3kwVA
    St. Kitts and the Caribbean

    Owen Lloyd arrived in the Caribbean on or about November 10, 1750. His first stop was at St. John now in the U.S. Virgin Islands. Days later he buried the majority of the Spanish treasure, which consisted of fifty chests of pieces of eight and two chests of worked silver. From there, Lloyd, his crew, and his treasure were scattered among the islands.
    Norman Island. It was here in the British Virgin Islands that Lloyd and his crew buried the treasure stolen from the Spaniards at Ocracoke, North Carolina. Today, legends abound about treasure having been buried on this uninhabited island.
    Norman Island today.
    Tortola. Located six miles north of Norman Island in the British Virgin Islands. It was here that officials attempted to recover the treasure buried at Norman Island. Within days of Owen Lloyd’s departure, many of the inhabitants of Tortola had recovered most of the treasure. Later, in 1751, more treasure was discovered in the hands of the people of Tortola.

    St. John. Located just west of Norman Island in the U.S. Virgin Islands. It was here that Lloyd stopped for supplies before he buried his treasure.

    St. Thomas. Located in the U.S. Virgin Islands. In the late 17th and early 18th centuries, this island had the reputation for harboring thieves and pirates. At that time it was owned by Denmark, as was St. John and St. Croix. Governor Christian Suhm likewise gave Owen Lloyd asylum here until he met his untimely end.

    St. Croix. Located south of St. Thomas and Norman Island in the U.S. Virgin Islands. Owen Lloyd stopped here on his way to St. Kitts after burying his treasure at Norman Island. It is highly likely that Lloyd secreted some of the stolen treasure on this island.

    Anguilla. A small low lying island with beautiful beaches. Some of the treasure was taken here by William Blackstock, a one-eyed Scotsman who forced his way onto Lloyd’s sloop at Ocracoke, North Carolina. The treasure was seized by the governor, Benjamin Gumbs.


    The Caines Plantation, St. Kitts. A prime target for investment in historical tourism.

    St. George’s Episcopal Church in Basseterre, St. Kitts. Alan Stevenson, the great grandfather of Robert Louis Stevenson was buried here in 1774.

    Also buried here is an Elizabeth Lloyd who died in 1759, possibly the daughter of Owen Lloyd.

    St. Kitts
    . Also known as St. Christopher’s, this island is located 130 miles southeast of the British Virgin Islands. This beautiful island was considered the crown jewel of the Caribbean by the English and also called the Mother of the Antilles. St. Kitts was Owen Lloyd’s ultimate destination. It was here that his wife, Christian, was living with her brother, Charles Caines, on the family plantation at Dieppe Bay at the north end of the island. This island became the epicenter for the search for remaining treasure in the Caribbean and the apprehension of Owen Lloyd. It was here that Lt. General Gilbert Fleming, the acting governor of the Leeward Islands, and the attorney general, John Baker, lived. Fleming oversaw the effort to recover and return the treasure to the Spaniards. Basseterre, St. Kitts, is also the burial place for the great grandfather of Robert Louis Stevenson.

    St. Eustatius
    . A Dutch island just north of St. Kitts which was a great trading center for Caribbean produce in the 18th century. Owen Lloyd and some of his crew fled here from St. Kitts to avoid capture, only to be discovered by Governor Johannes Heyliger and imprisoned on Fort Oranje. Lloyd made a daring escape and fled to St. Thomas.
    .
    Saba. A small Dutch island west of St. Eustatius. Several of Owen Lloyd’s crew were apprehended here along with their share of the treasure and taken to St. Eustatius. They also escaped with Owen Lloyd.
    Antigua. This island was the seat of English government in the Leeward Islands and is located southeast of St. Kitt’s. Some of the treasure recoveries were coordinated at this island.
    Montserrat. A volcanic island located south of St. Kitts. Because of rumors that Owen Lloyd had stopped here, English authorities investigated here for more of the stolen treasure.





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    Last edited by Rum_Pirate; 07-05-2019 at 01:42 PM.
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    Default Re: Treasure Island-untold story-great grandfather of Robert Louis Stevenson & Owen L

    Not for nothing, is there a bay at Charlestown Nevis, named 'Gallows Bay'.

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    Default Re: Treasure Island-untold story-great grandfather of Robert Louis Stevenson & Owen L

    http://www.treasure-island-day.com/saint-kitts/
    St. Kitts

    Basseterre, St. Kitts in the Leward Islands played a prominent role in the story of the real Treasure Island
    St. Kitts was considered the “Mother of the Antilles” in Colonial times. It was here the wealthiest sugar planters established plantations dedicated to the production of sugar, molasses and rum.
    One prominent family was that of Colonel Charles Caines who established a plantation at the north end of the island.
    He passed away on 1737 leaving his son Charles to take over. Charles’ sister, Christian, married Owen Lloyd, a dashing privateer, in 1746.
    The wedding was held at Norfolk, Virginia, and was attended by her brother Charles and Owen’s one legged brother, John.
    Owen was a popular captain in Hampton Roads and many of his fellow merchants attended as well.
    During the war Owen and Christian suffered great hardship while living in Virginia.
    He lost his sloop to a Spanish privateer in 1747. His brother John was acting as captain and was put in prison in Havana, Cuba. Owen was forced to mortgage their mahogany furniture and his slaves to get money to ransom his brother out of the Havana dungeon.
    Then came a great hurricane in 1749 that flooded the streets of Hampton they ruined much of what he owned. After falling on hard times, he was arrested for petit larceny and confined to the Hampton jail.
    Fortunately, his former boss, a wealthy merchant and former mayor of Norfolk, John Hutchings, bailed him out.
    Once he regained his freedom, Christian decided to she wanted to return to the comforts of the family plantation at St. Kitts. Owen was distraught. He convinced his brother to go with him to St. Kitts so that he could make amends with his wife. On September 10, he sailed out of Hampton Roads in great anticipation of a new life.
    Just prior to his departure, a hurricane swept a Spanish fleet up the east coast where some were wrecked. One galleon, the Nuestra Senora de Guadalupe, came to anchor near Ocracoke Inlet, North Carolina, a port the he traded in several years before. Lloyd’s sloop sprung a leak forcing them to the safety of the inlet.
    Owen Lloyd was determined to get to St. Kitts to reunite with his wife but there were no vessels that would take him.
    Everyone’s attention was now on the richly laden galleon.
    Owen and John Lloyd realized that someone was going to steal the treasure and when Owen saw the treasure chests being offloaded onto two sloops, he saw an opportunity for himself.
    At two pm on October 20, 1750, the two sloops weighed anchor with Owen and John Lloyd at the helm.
    The Spanish guards had been caught unawares while they were having lunch on board the galleon.
    John Lloyd’s sloop ran aground but Owen cleared the inlet and headed for St. Kitts, expecting a warm welcome from his wife with his new found fortune.
    Lloyd realized that he couldn’t take all of the other eleven crew with him so he diverted to the Virgin Islands and divvied up the loot at Norman Island in the British Virgin Islands. Lloyd soon realized that he needed protection so he called on the governor of St. Thomas, an island that was reputed to be a haven for pirates, thieves, and malcontents.
    When Owen arrived at St. Kitts, his brother-in-law, Charles Caines said that he was a wanted man so he fled to nearby St. Eustatius where he was promptly arrested.
    With the help of the Caines family he bribed the guards and escaped, narrowly missing the hangman’s noose.
    Lloyd and Christian fled to St. Thomas but by the end of 1752 he was dead apparently murdered over the treasure.
    Christian later returned to St. Kitts.
    One of the abandoned buildings at the former plantation of Charles Caines on St. Kitts
    St. Kitts became the epicenter for the recovery of the treasure scattered around the Caribbean.
    Gilbert Fleming, Lieutenant General of the Leeward Islands resided on St. Kitts.
    He took it upon himself to round up the loot.
    Although most of what he recovered was returned to the Spanish captain, he made a generous reward to himself.
    Newly minted pieces of eight bearing the date of 1750 were now circulating around St. Kitts thanks to Owen Lloyd. Lloyd would be remembered for decades. His brother-in-law, Charles Caines, lived until 1799.
    In 1773, twenty-one year old Alan Stevenson arrived at St. Kitts to work for his uncle in the sugar business.
    The following year, he died from a mysterious fever surrounded by mysterious circumstances.
    Family legend says that he and his brother had been defrauded in a business deal.
    Alan left behind a wife and an only son named Robert.
    Robert was the grandfather of Robert Louis Stevenson.

    When it came time to put the date of 1750 on the map of Treasure Island, it was not Robert Louis Stevenson who made that note, but his father Thomas, the son of Robert who had lost his father mysteriously at St. Kitts.
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    Default Re: Treasure Island-untold story-great grandfather of Robert Louis Stevenson & Owen L

    November 11, 2011
    TREASURE ISLAND: THE UNTOLD STORY–TRANSLATOR UNEARTHS PIRATE TREASURE TALE


    A typical working day for Dutch translator Anne Lee might involve interpreting in a court case or deciphering contract papers.

    So when some letters from the 18th century detailing the daring theft of pirate treasure crossed her desk, it was the job of a lifetime.
    The documents told the story of two Welsh brothers who stole a cargo of coins, silver and other valuables from the ship they were working aboard as crew members.
    They buried this treasure on a Caribbean island.

    As the story unfolded, it started to bear an uncanny resemblance to the tale of Robert Louis Stevenson’s Treasure Island.

    This true story has now been published in a book, Treasure Island: The Untold Story, by American author John Amrhein, who had been researching the two brothers and the Spanish galleon they were aboard.
    Anne, of Pipers Hill Road, Kettering, was contacted in 2003 by the writer, who wanted her to translate the hand-written letters that had been held at the National Archief in the Netherlands.
    It was painstaking work – the old documents had ink blotches, the writing was in an ornate, swirly font and the letters were from a time before the Dutch language had developed uniform spelling rules.
    Anne said: “I found that I could transcribe the letters and then translate them, and I was amazed how the text opened up.

    “It turned out the letters were correspondence between Dutch commanders based in the Caribbean. I was completely under the spell of these texts. It was so interesting and I worked very long hours on it because I absolutely loved it. It has been the most interesting job I have ever done.”
    The letters revealed an account of a Spanish galleon which had been diverted from its course by a storm.

    The two brothers, John and Owen Lloyd, one of whom had a wooden leg, were entrusted with rescuing the ship’s valuable load of cochineal (a highly-priced red dye), eight tons of silver pieces, chests of silverware, gold and other jewels.

    The brothers decided to seize their chance and claim the treasure for themselves.

    John Lloyd was captured, but Owen made it to the Caribbean, where he buried the loot on Norman Island in the British Virgin Islands. Owen was later caught and held in the fort on St Eustatius.

    He was condemned to the gallows for theft.

    But as Anne discovered from the documents, Owen bribed his guards to make his escape.

    She said: “It was an amazing real-life story that was unravelling in front of my eyes.”

    Author Mr Amrhein found there were links between Robert Louis Stevenson’s fictional Treasure Island and what really happened all those years ago.

    The grandfather of Robert Louis Stevenson was buried on St Kitts, a neighbouring island to St Eustatius, and Robert had gone to visit him the year before he started writing Treasure Island.

    It also transpired that Robert married a woman called Fanny Osbourne, a former lover of one of John Lloyd’s descendants.
    Then there is John’s peg leg, suggesting he may have been the inspiration for the legendary character Long John Silver.
    So what happened to the treasure?
    Anne said: “Some of it they had to give to the crew to bribe them to go along with the theft.
    “They buried the rest of it on the island, but it was discovered by the authorities when they found out about it.
    “At first, the brothers were celebrated as heroes because the Spanish were hated.
    “This happened after the English-Spanish war, and the Spanish had behaved in an awful way and robbed a lot of people of their money.
    “In the end, they didn’t get away with much of the treasure, which their wives were not very happy about!”

    She added: “It has been an absolutely fantastic job and one I’ll never forget.”

    Treasure Island: The Untold Story by John Amrhein is available to buy on Amazon for 20.

    For the original report go to http://www.northantset.co.uk/news/fe...tale_1_3227294


    https://repeatingislands.com/2011/11...treasure-tale/
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  5. #5
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    Default Re: Treasure Island-untold story-great grandfather of Robert Louis Stevenson & Owen L

    So it came from Ocracoke Island, North Carolina! I have spent vacations there and never knew that.

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    Default Re: Treasure Island-untold story-great grandfather of Robert Louis Stevenson & Owen L

    Great thread! Treasure Island was and is one my favorite books. The backstory is fascinating. Thanks for posting.

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    Default Re: Treasure Island-untold story-great grandfather of Robert Louis Stevenson & Owen L

    Great story!

    Another fascinating aspect of Stevenson is that the family business as building lighthouses.

    I recommend “The Lighthouse Stevenson’s”, if you are interested.

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