Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 36 to 70 of 77

Thread: Port Townsend or (probably) bust

  1. #36
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Lakebay, WA
    Posts
    887

    Default Re: Port Townsend or (probably) bust

    Hi Chris,
    I have been looking at sculling shells for sale, and since you have mentioned about trailer for your rower, here is this very interesting set up as an example. Could be pulled by any car I would think........this boat is 21' long...Pocock Wherry.

    Pocock.jpg

    Pocock 1.jpg
    "Little Bear" 1955 Fontana 18' - 1958 Atomic 4
    1960 Skippy 12C FeatherCraft - 1947 Mercury KD4 Rocket
    " Fela " 1985 Glen L15 - 1977 Johnson 15 hp
    2016 kayak Mill Creek 13

  2. #37
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Fairfield, CA
    Posts
    1,854

    Default Re: Port Townsend or (probably) bust

    I think that boat is a great choice for a long open water race. I've done short (8 - 10 mile) races in my much bigger Walkabout, in a separate class but racing with the Maas type shells. The Walkabout does not even manage 5 kts in a sprint, and the in races averages about 4 kts. The shells will blow me away on flat water, but in heavy chop I find we are about the same speed. Their narrow hulls have to punch through the waves, while my boat rises over them. Rowing a shell is also tiring, having to actively maintain balance. Your boat should do well.

    If you have space to store it a trailer makes prep and launching much easier. For a while I owned a SOF LFH17 to car top instead of trailer. I just did not use it much, loading it and getting it in the water took longer than hooking up the trailer and bringing the bigger boat.

    FWIW my exercise is more cycling than rowing now due to time constraint. I have bikes at work to do lunch rides, at home with baskets for grocery runs, and with an electric motor to commute on. Bikes do not work upper body, but since slide seat rowing is mostly leg it is still a really good cross-train if you can fit some rides in.

    -Rick

  3. #38
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Posts
    4,546

    Default Re: Port Townsend or (probably) bust

    Ok then. Seems like the face shields are worth looking into. I'm making a list. Hat, sunglasses, mirror, face shield... And now trailer as well. I have one of the small EZ-Loader trailers that is set up for the Whitehall but it's really too big for Rocinante. I think I need to sell it and get one of these:



    Trailex aluminum trailer designed for lightweight boats. One of those would be perfect. Light and small enough to move around easily in the shop where the EZ-Loader is a bit unwieldy.

    And Rick, thanks for the comments about Rocinante in comparison to your Walkabout. I've seen 6 kt in Rocinante for brief periods. I'm guessing I could get up to 6.5 kt, but only for a minute or two at most! Five knots is pretty easy to do for extended periods so I figure 4-5kt will be comfortable on a long distance event. She's pretty stable as well. Not walk-around stable for sure, but still very forgiving. We hit several freighter wakes and many sizable powerboat wakes yesterday and I was able to keep rowing through just about everything.

    As for rowing vs. bicycling... yes, that makes sense. My problem is that I no longer enjoy riding in city traffic and it takes too long to get out to anywhere that I like to ride. One can only ride the Burke Gilman Trail (the most accessible bike trail in Seattle) so many times without becoming entirely bored with the route and I think I hit that milestone sometime back in 2011. As much as I hate indoor exercise I may just have to break down and start working out on an erg again. It's not fun but it's the most efficient way to put in the time.
    - Chris

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  4. #39
    Join Date
    Jun 2019
    Location
    Bellingham, WA, USA
    Posts
    621

    Default Re: Port Townsend or (probably) bust

    Every fitness center I have been in has had a stationary rowing machine tucked away in some corner.

  5. #40
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Posts
    4,546

    Default Re: Port Townsend or (probably) bust

    Quote Originally Posted by SeanM26 View Post
    Every fitness center I have been in has had a stationary rowing machine tucked away in some corner.
    Oh, definitely. The erg is the least-used piece of cardio equipment in every gym. Occasionally someone will sit down and start yanking on the thing like they are trying to rip the chain off the fan but you almost never see anyone who looks like they know what they are doing. The problem isn't finding one - the gym in the basement of the building my office is in has a couple. The problem is that I hate sitting on the damn thing and staring at myself in the mirror (there is always a mirror) for an hour or two.

    But I timed myself yesterday. It takes me 15 minutes to load or unload the boat what with rolling the boat out of the shop, removing the drop-in seat unit, putting the boat on the rack, putting the seat unit into the boat, strapping the boat to the rack and then putting the oars in the boat. (Don't forget the oars! Did that once already. Fortunately they were still sitting where I left them when I realized my mistake and went back for them. Also fortunately I hadn't left them where I would drive over them when I pulled out.) Then you have to do the same thing in reverse to launch the boat. And do it all over again to put the boat away. So I am spending a full hour just fussing with the boat each time I go for a row. A trailer probably cuts that time down to maybe 10 minutes total but until I get that sorted I'm only going to have time to row on weekends. So the erg may be the best way to get training time in during the week.
    - Chris

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  6. #41
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Fairfield, CA
    Posts
    1,854

    Default Re: Port Townsend or (probably) bust

    I have one of the slightly larger Trailex trailers (SUT-500-S). They are nice and light, can work as a dolly. Springs are better matched to light boats than most other trailers. Rust resistant aluminum is good. On the down side, prices are high (especially for do it yourself assembly). Be careful of the sharp edges on the lead-on roller bracket, that can do some damage if the boat is not aligned (DAMHIKT). Lights are minimal, hard to see if a long boat overhangs the end. And, the small wheels are not highway speed balanced.

  7. #42
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Lynden, Wa
    Posts
    3,682

    Default Re: Port Townsend or (probably) bust

    No trailer needed.

    On-top of the existing cross bars, add a lengthwise beam. Mount your existing mount at the front crossbar, and put a Thule Hully Roller at the aft end of the beam, as far back as possible without interfering with the hatch.

    Then, loading the boat is as simple as setting the stern on the ground and setting the bow in the rollers. Pick up the stern and roll it forward. This way you only have to lift half the weight of the boat at a time up to rack height.



    Or put it in the back of the Studebaker.
    There's the plan, then there's what actually happens.

    Ben Sebens, RN

    15' Welsford Navigator Inconceivable
    16' W. Simmons Mattinicus double ender ​Matty

  8. #43
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Fairfield, CA
    Posts
    1,854

    Default Re: Port Townsend or (probably) bust

    Having tried something like Ben's plan may I just say that's fine if the boat is quite light compared to your lifting ability (my lifting ability is low due to back injury). First, you still have to get the boat from the water's edge to the car. Lifting the bow up onto the roller means all holding friction is on the stern, which tends to slide back on grass or dirt and scrape on concrete. The whole boat can take a slider and fall off on an angled ramp, unless you have another person to block at the stern. It's possible, but not slam dunk simple compared to trailer.

  9. #44
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Posts
    4,546

    Default Re: Port Townsend or (probably) bust

    I like Ben's plan and I really wish I thought it could work for me. But my experience doing something similar is much more in line with Rick's description. A couple of years ago I got one of the roller thingies that attaches to the rear window with suction cups and tried loading one of the wooden kayaks we have with it. It worked ok the first time, although getting the bow up onto the roller without the stern sliding around was tricky. But then I tried it again just for practice. That was once to many as the bow slipped out of my grasp and plunged right through the rear window. At which point I found that my auto glass coverage deductible is so high that it would have been less expensive to just buy the trailer...
    - Chris

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  10. #45
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Fairfield, CA
    Posts
    1,854

    Default Re: Port Townsend or (probably) bust

    You mentioned a mirror Chris. This comes up a lot, some rowers like bike style eyeglass mirrors but most of us use a mirror-on-a-stick, attached to the boat. What kind of mirror? I have tried flat (not enough field of view) and curved motorcycle (too curved, objects are too hard to see until you hit them). The goldilocks for me is a ski boat mirror, it's wide to start and mildly convex, gives a good view with enough time to react.


  11. #46
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Posts
    4,546

    Default Re: Port Townsend or (probably) bust

    Ah - ski boat mirror! Perfect. Thanks Rick. I have one on order now.
    - Chris

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  12. #47
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Posts
    4,546

    Default Re: Port Townsend or (probably) bust

    Well I finished Log from the Sea of Cortez last night and have fallen in love with Steinbeck all over again. He has his flaws and detractors to be sure. What artist does not? But his writing... It's pure jazz. Lyric, humorous, intellectual, curious - all rolled up in an enormous passion for life. When I was in college I loved Hemingway for what I thought of at the time as a heroic vision. "For Whom the Bell Tolls" and all that. But Hemingway treats life as just the thing that one has to get through before dying, which for him is an ultimate act of mortality that reveals the nature of life. There may be love and wine and light before then but those things are just the prelude to a good or tragic death. But for Steinbeck life is to be lived! Lived in all of its contradictions, petty acts and carnal urges. In Steinbeck mortality is merely an inevitable and natural part of life, neither greater nor lesser than any other part.

    I particularly loved the hunt of the Bighorn Sheep. In Hemingway, to hunt or to fight an animal is to do battle with one's own fear of death, whether it's the Old Man Santiago and his marlin or the blood sport of the bull ring. But Steinbeck has an altogether different view. The party from the Western Flyer accompany a group of local Mexican notables and two Mexican Indians into the mountains to hunt a sheep but it turns out that the Mexicans have no intention of actually hunting the sheep. They will sit in camp and drink and tell stories while the Indians hunt the sheep. And the Indians do hunt, but they do not find or kill the sheep, they merely bring some sheep droppings back to camp. And then everyone goes home happy for they have done what they set out to do without the inconvenience of actually killing anything. Steinbeck summarizes the expedition as "the best of all ways to go hunting" except that in the future he would make "one slight improvement...we shall not take a gun, thereby obviating the last remote possibility of having the hunt cluttered up with game."

    But enough thread drift! Back to rowing. To date the longest distance I have done is the 11 nm that I did on Sunday. To put that in perspective...



    I'd be about half way up Colvos Passage with still a long way to go. But there is one thing about Seventy 48 that was not immediately obvious to me. It's 70 statute miles, not 70 nautical miles. I guess "Seventy 48" sounds better than "Sixty Point Eight Forty Eight". And in reality its not even 60.8 nm. More like 58 nm not counting any side trips, stops or deviations in course. So I can tell myself that I just need to do that same distance a bit over five times and I'm done. Seems easy enough when you put it that way...

    Of course I was talking with one of my neighbors about it on Saturday and he mentioned that some friends of his had rowed Seventy 48 in a four-with-cox'n. They also rowed straight through, with a few breaks along the way but not stopping to sleep, and he said they found it to be much harder than they expected. So there's that.
    - Chris

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  13. #48
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Location
    St. Helens, Oregon
    Posts
    2,318

    Default Re: Port Townsend or (probably) bust

    So...it sounds like Steinbeck was a hunter in the Patrick McManus vein (look him up) and thus, a man after my own heart. Sounds like your training program is coming along nicely!

  14. #49
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Posts
    4,546

    Default Re: Port Townsend or (probably) bust

    Patrick McManus... Thanks Hugh. I had not read him at all but now he's going on the list. Right after I finish reading another birthday gift, this one from my Dad:



    I'm ashamed to admit that I've never read it but I plan to remedy that failure shortly.
    - Chris

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  15. #50
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Kailua, HI
    Posts
    238

    Default Re: Port Townsend or (probably) bust

    Doesnt it feel as though Steinbeck would be a great guy to cruise/adventure with? He surely had his faults, as do we all, but his views of life and the natural world, along with his thoughtful approach to other humans...
    OK, back to rowing!
    Brian

  16. #51
    Join Date
    Oct 2017
    Location
    Berkeley, CA
    Posts
    162

    Default Re: Port Townsend or (probably) bust

    With apologies for perpetuating the thread drift, the Western Flyer is under restoration, very cool videos here: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCXI...MBAHorIYCft-WQ

  17. #52
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Posts
    4,546

    Default Re: Port Townsend or (probably) bust

    Quote Originally Posted by Boatsbgood View Post
    Doesnt it feel as though Steinbeck would be a great guy to cruise/adventure with? He surely had his faults, as do we all, but his views of life and the natural world, along with his thoughtful approach to other humans...
    OK, back to rowing!
    Brian
    Yes, exactly. He examines the human animal with a judicious eye but also with understanding and acceptance. Although he can be scathing on the subjects of oppression, inequality, war, injustice and so on. I think I would have found him entirely simpatico.

    Quote Originally Posted by nrs5000 View Post
    With apologies for perpetuating the thread drift, the Western Flyer is under restoration, very cool videos here: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCXI...MBAHorIYCft-WQ
    No apology needed! In truth I usually enjoy the drifting more than the topic. Yes, I've been meaning to pay a pilgrimage to Port Townsend to see her. I also have the book about her, "The Western Flyer", by Kevin M. Bailey. Which I have not yet read because I figured I should read Log from the Sea of Cortez first. So now I have done that and am free to read The Western Flyer but it's buried in the stack of books on my nightstand so it may have to wait until I read down to it...
    - Chris

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  18. #53
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Posts
    4,546

    Default Re: Port Townsend or (probably) bust

    Ah, I see it has been over two months since I last updated this thread. There has been very little to update about to be honest. Partly because various events have taken me away from rowing (cruising aboard Skookum Maru and work travel in August then back-to-school activities and single-parent duties in September). But time constraints are no excuse and in truth the real challenge is still how to deal with the boat since I can't easily car-top it.

    I've just about made up my mind to sell the EZ-Hauler trailer that I have been using for the whitehall and buy a smaller Trailex that will be more suitable for the rowing shell. But as with everything involving boats (at least for me), doing that is not quite so simple as it sounds. Before I can get a new trailer I need to move the old one out of the shop to make room. And before I can move the old one out I need to get the whitehall off of it. But before I can get the whitehall off of the trailer I needed to make room to move it. Which meant moving a ton (no exaggeration) of old boat parts, old car parts, old motorcycle parts, random stacks of lumber, several kayaks and a couple of dinghies out of the way. Which I have now done.




    I think that's the first time I've seen the floor in the shop for at least three years now. I still need to get the whitehall off the trailer, but it's a start.

    However there is something far more important that I need to do first. Something without which I will be entirely unable to set out, much less row to Port Townsend. Seventy 48 registration is now open for 2020 but before I can register I need a team name. And here I am stuck. I have ideas... Team Skookum? Team Port-Townsend-Or-Bust (or in the spirit of Seventy 48 and R2AK name puns, perhaps it should be Team-Port-Townsend-Oar-Bust)? Other possibilities include "Row Row Row Your Boat" and "Team No Point"... Still thinking though. Suggestions welcomed!
    - Chris

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  19. #54
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Lakebay, WA
    Posts
    887

    Default Re: Port Townsend or (probably) bust

    Would this trailer fit my 15' long , 70" wide Fela? I would like to get good trailer for her.
    .....as far as team name...."Team Dash" sounds right to me.
    "Little Bear" 1955 Fontana 18' - 1958 Atomic 4
    1960 Skippy 12C FeatherCraft - 1947 Mercury KD4 Rocket
    " Fela " 1985 Glen L15 - 1977 Johnson 15 hp
    2016 kayak Mill Creek 13

  20. #55
    Join Date
    Jun 2019
    Location
    Bellingham, WA, USA
    Posts
    621

    Default Re: Port Townsend or (probably) bust

    Team Oh God What Am I Doing.

  21. #56
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Posts
    4,546

    Default Re: Port Townsend or (probably) bust

    Wojo, I sent you an email about the trailer. I like Team Dash - that's a great idea.

    SeanM26, "Team Oh God What Am I Doing" is a good name too, but maybe a bit too much reality there!
    - Chris

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  22. #57
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Posts
    4,546

    Default Re: Port Townsend or (probably) bust

    So, despite long gaps between posts here I am actually continuing on this quest. The old, too-large trailer went away to a forum member last weekend, making room for the new one, which Dash and I assembled today:



    I still need to do some setup work to finish fitting it for the boat but so far it seems like it will work great. And now I can stop trying to wrestle the boat on top of the car which will make it easier to get out on the water.

    That's all good but perhaps more significantly, as we are heading into the dark and rainy wasteland that is winter in Seattle, I have renewed my long-standing acquaintence with the rack, er, I mean erg.



    Always tucked into the furthest corner of the gym, generally abused (I saw a guy using one to do curls the other day), universally despised by all but CRASH-B whackos and the truly masochistic. And my morning companion for the next few months until the sun comes back. Sure, I'll get out on the water as much as I can but for just putting in the miles through the winter I expect that the machine will be a better bet.
    - Chris

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  23. #58
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Lakebay, WA
    Posts
    887

    Default Re: Port Townsend or (probably) bust

    nice trailer!
    .....I get by with le$$ complicated set up
    Feather Craft.jpg
    "Little Bear" 1955 Fontana 18' - 1958 Atomic 4
    1960 Skippy 12C FeatherCraft - 1947 Mercury KD4 Rocket
    " Fela " 1985 Glen L15 - 1977 Johnson 15 hp
    2016 kayak Mill Creek 13

  24. #59
    Join Date
    Feb 2017
    Location
    Seattle, W.A., U.S.A
    Posts
    175

    Default Re: Port Townsend or (probably) bust

    I have a 12 foot peapod that lives in the ship canal, that you would be welcome to borrow if you wanted more on the water practice. PM me if you might be interested.

  25. #60
    Join Date
    Aug 2016
    Location
    Olympia, WA USA
    Posts
    16

    Default Re: Port Townsend or (probably) bust

    Chris, I have been following your thread with interest, and am rooting for your success! I love to row, and have an open water rowing shell called an Echo. The Echo has not gotten a lot of use since I got my Scamp sailboat a few years ago. But sailing, with all its virtues, doesn't do much for fitness ( at least physical fitness.) Since retiring in the end of the summer, I have more time, and want to get back into rowing. The erg is a sort of necessary evil this time of year. I found a program on line that has lots of videos about the best way to use the erg in terms of form, and has programs on how to get faster and stronger. I thought you might find it helpful. Unfortunately, there is a cost involved, but you still might want to look into it. If you google Dark Horse Crew, you will find it.

    Another thing you might want to look into are the Sound Rowers races. These races are much shorter than the 70/48 but might give you some experience before the big event in June. I trained for and raced (well, participated in) the Bainbridge Island Marathon, a 26 mile row that was fun and very tiring several years ago. At 62, that might be a goal for me. I think the 70/48 is more than I want-- I really like my sleep!
    Samantha

  26. #61
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Lakebay, WA
    Posts
    887

    Default Re: Port Townsend or (probably) bust

    Never hear about the Echo , but does look pretty good.
    I am looking into building Driade.
    Had a chance to see Chris rowing shell and it is REALLY nice.
    "Little Bear" 1955 Fontana 18' - 1958 Atomic 4
    1960 Skippy 12C FeatherCraft - 1947 Mercury KD4 Rocket
    " Fela " 1985 Glen L15 - 1977 Johnson 15 hp
    2016 kayak Mill Creek 13

  27. #62
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Posts
    4,546

    Default Re: Port Townsend or (probably) bust

    Quote Originally Posted by Pelirrojo View Post
    I have a 12 foot peapod that lives in the ship canal, that you would be welcome to borrow if you wanted more on the water practice. PM me if you might be interested.
    Thanks Pelirrojo. I might take you up on that! I'm also curious about where you keep your boat. I have another boat that I have been thinking about keeping in the water if I could find a suitable place to put it. I'll PM you.

    Quote Originally Posted by Samantha View Post
    Chris, I have been following your thread with interest, and am rooting for your success! I love to row, and have an open water rowing shell called an Echo. The Echo has not gotten a lot of use since I got my Scamp sailboat a few years ago. But sailing, with all its virtues, doesn't do much for fitness ( at least physical fitness.) Since retiring in the end of the summer, I have more time, and want to get back into rowing. The erg is a sort of necessary evil this time of year. I found a program on line that has lots of videos about the best way to use the erg in terms of form, and has programs on how to get faster and stronger. I thought you might find it helpful. Unfortunately, there is a cost involved, but you still might want to look into it. If you google Dark Horse Crew, you will find it.

    Another thing you might want to look into are the Sound Rowers races. These races are much shorter than the 70/48 but might give you some experience before the big event in June. I trained for and raced (well, participated in) the Bainbridge Island Marathon, a 26 mile row that was fun and very tiring several years ago. At 62, that might be a goal for me. I think the 70/48 is more than I want-- I really like my sleep!
    Samantha
    Thanks Samantha! I recall your Seattle adventure aboard your Scamp. The Echo sure looks like a nice boat. I've joined the Sound Rowers and plan on doing some of their early spring events next year to train for Seventy 48. And I'll check out the Dark Horse Crew videos. Anything to occupy the time while erging...


    Quote Originally Posted by 2dogsnight View Post
    Never hear about the Echo , but does look pretty good.
    I am looking into building Driade.
    Had a chance to see Chris rowing shell and it is REALLY nice.
    Thanks Wojo


    A bit more progress today. I've submitted my application for the 2020 edition of Seventy 48. Now I wait while they verify my bonafides, consider my "adventure resume" (I've never had an adventure resume before. Seems a bit like I should have a list of Iron Man competitions completed and maybe a cross-Atlantic row or two rather than just a list of moderately difficult long bicycle rides), and throw darts at a board to determine if they will let me row.


    Fingers crossed.
    - Chris

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  28. #63
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Posts
    4,546

    Default Re: Port Townsend or (probably) bust

    Welp, that didn't take long. I just got the response to my application and I'm in! Guess it's getting real now.
    - Chris

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  29. #64
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Posts
    4,546

    Default Re: Port Townsend or (probably) bust

    Finished rigging the new trailer on Friday and used it for the first time today. It was a perfect fall morning for a row here in Seattle.








    Launching and retrieving was much easier and faster with the trailer than by car-topping so I'm calling it a complete success on that front. I definitely do need a bow eye and a painter though. More on that subject in another thread here http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthre...l-with-no-stem.

    And I am going to need a way to rig a fender or two as well since the floating docks at the launch are just the right height that the bow will miss the bumper and catch under the edge of the dock when the boat is left unattended while I park the trailer. Luckily no damage done this time but something to avoid in the future.



    Out on the Sound things were quite busy, with the Saturday sailboat races well underway. The fleet paced me a little farther offshore as I headed north from the boat launch. Very scenic but I also received a lesson in how close to the beach some of the racers will go to gain an edge when one of the boats headed directly for me. I was only a few yards off the beach and could see the bottom clearly below me so I assumed they would tack well outside. But as they approached the woman on the bow started motioning wildly for me to row away from the beach and the skipper shouted that they would tack inside of me. Which they did. It was not a small boat either. I'd guess they drew 6' and they couldn't have had more than a couple of feet more than that under the keel when they tacked! I shouted good luck to them as they sailed off and kept a closer eye on the fleet after that.



    There was a moderate breeze from the north when I set out, with wind waves of about a foot or so. Easy open water rowing conditions. But after the first half mile or so, after I got out of the lee of Meadow Point, the waves increased to two feet with the occasional larger cresting wave mixed in. This was my first time rowing Rocinante in anything other than a flat calm and upwind at least she was a joy to row. Her bow went right through the larger waves but the coaming did it's job and she shipped almost no water. I didn't go very far however as the waves were increasing and I wanted to see how she would do downwind.

    By the time I turned back I was in the largest waves I have encountered in anything as small and light as Rocinante. In a heavier boat with more freeboard like the 17' whitehall sitting back in the shop I would have called it a brisk but enjoyable day to be on the water. In Rocinante it was somewhat more exciting than that! It was a bit of work to keep her from broaching when surfing the larger waves. I also had to keep crabbing off of the beach to clear the point, meaning that we were in quartering seas for part of the time. Not the easiest conditions for rowing but again Rocinante took everything as it came. I never once thought we were in any danger so long as I was paying attention.

    One lesson from today though is that I definitely want to be able to raise the oar height in these conditions. The oarlocks are adjustable but they don't have removable spacers right now so changing the height requires tools. I need to swap out the washers for spacers so I can adjust the height on the water. Also I wonder if a skeg would reduce her tendency to broach at all. It was easy enough to control but it definitely took some concentration.

    Another lesson is that a standard PFD is too cumbersome. Which I knew already but I have been used to rowing without one (although I have always kept one in the boat). Today though I definitely wanted to be wearing it. And it was a constant annoyance as I caught an oar handle in the straps on several occasions. So now I'm thinking I should get a belt pack PFD.

    So, a short row today but I think the learning made up for the lack of distance.
    - Chris

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  30. #65
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Posts
    4,546

    Default Re: Port Townsend or (probably) bust

    Well it’s official. NW Maritime Center has canceled SEVENTY48 and R2AK for 2020. I believe it’s the right decision and the only one they could make in the circumstances. And as I haven’t been able to train in weeks it’s unlikely that I would have made it to the starting line this year in any case. So that’s it for this attempt but I’m all in for next year!
    - Chris

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  31. #66
    Join Date
    Aug 2016
    Location
    Olympia, WA USA
    Posts
    16

    Default Re: Port Townsend or (probably) bust

    Quote Originally Posted by cstevens View Post
    Well itís official. NW Maritime Center has canceled SEVENTY48 and R2AK for 2020. I believe itís the right decision and the only one they could make in the circumstances. And as I havenít been able to train in weeks itís unlikely that I would have made it to the starting line this year in any case. So thatís it for this attempt but Iím all in for next year!
    Chris, I find it much easier to do just about anything when I have a goal, and getting into good rowing shape is no exception. About five years ago, I participated in the Sound Rowers Around Bainbridge Island Marathon, which is just about exactly 26 miles. The Sound Rowers races are cancelled for this year, although they might re-instate them if Covid gets under better control. The race is scheduled for September 12th. I am thinking about training for that race, and if it's not re-instated, then I would row it on a day in September with the best tides for getting me around that island as fast as possible. (I am not a very fast rower, I am 63, and I have an Echo Rowing Shell, which is great for stability but not very long or very fast.) My goal would be to beat 5 hours. Would you like to train for this too? We could encourage each other from a distance. Samantha

  32. #67
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Portland, Oregon
    Posts
    66,569

    Default Re: Port Townsend or (probably) bust

    Quote Originally Posted by John Kohnen View Post
    I thought for sure I was gonna become a victim of Piracy when I saw this apparition approaching me in Hale Passage during the Salish 100!
    You were right to be concerned. His sidekick is notorious for shooting up the place.

    Even with straight-laced, pure ol' me aboard Wiz came close to shanghaiing a pair lovelies off of one of the schooners during a PT SailBy. And you're way prettier than they were! It was only by reminding him that we were low on rum and needed to go ashore to restock that I was able to distract him <G>
    David G
    Harbor Woodworks
    https://www.facebook.com/HarborWoodworks/

    "It was a Sunday morning and Goddard gave thanks that there were still places where one could worship in temples not made by human hands." -- L. F. Herreshoff (The Compleat Cruiser)

  33. #68
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Portland, Oregon
    Posts
    66,569

    Default Re: Port Townsend or (probably) bust

    Chris... brilliant!
    David G
    Harbor Woodworks
    https://www.facebook.com/HarborWoodworks/

    "It was a Sunday morning and Goddard gave thanks that there were still places where one could worship in temples not made by human hands." -- L. F. Herreshoff (The Compleat Cruiser)

  34. #69
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Posts
    4,546

    Default Re: Port Townsend or (probably) bust

    Quote Originally Posted by Samantha View Post
    Chris, I find it much easier to do just about anything when I have a goal, and getting into good rowing shape is no exception. About five years ago, I participated in the Sound Rowers Around Bainbridge Island Marathon, which is just about exactly 26 miles. The Sound Rowers races are cancelled for this year, although they might re-instate them if Covid gets under better control. The race is scheduled for September 12th. I am thinking about training for that race, and if it's not re-instated, then I would row it on a day in September with the best tides for getting me around that island as fast as possible. (I am not a very fast rower, I am 63, and I have an Echo Rowing Shell, which is great for stability but not very long or very fast.) My goal would be to beat 5 hours. Would you like to train for this too? We could encourage each other from a distance. Samantha
    Quote Originally Posted by David G View Post
    Chris... brilliant!
    That is indeed a brilliant idea Samantha! Yes, I'm in. I definitely need a goal to defeat the creeping covid shutdown blahs that are beginning to glue me to my chair.

    Ok then. Now I just need a plan to get on the water. My schedule has been entirely turned on its head by the need to home school a math-averse seven year old so I'll have to get creative...
    - Chris

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  35. #70
    Join Date
    Aug 2016
    Location
    Olympia, WA USA
    Posts
    16

    Default Re: Port Townsend or (probably) bust

    Quote Originally Posted by cstevens View Post
    That is indeed a brilliant idea Samantha! Yes, I'm in. I definitely need a goal to defeat the creeping covid shutdown blahs that are beginning to glue me to my chair.

    Ok then. Now I just need a plan to get on the water. My schedule has been entirely turned on its head by the need to home school a math-averse seven year old so I'll have to get creative...
    It's pretty easy for me to get on the water, as Henderson Inlet is out our back door, so I have no excuses that way. (Well, I can't row if the tide is too low, but that can easily be worked around.) I hope to row three times a week for now, and work on increasing my mileage. I rowed a little over 10 miles to Nisqually Reach, and was quite tired after that, even though it was perfect conditions and the current helped push me along. On rainy days, i can use a Concept2 indoor rowing machine. Not nearly as much fun, but at least I am doing something. So my goal for May is to consistently row three times a week, and increase my stamina.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •