Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 35 of 64

Thread: Port Townsend or (probably) bust

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Posts
    3,970

    Default Port Townsend or (probably) bust

    Iíve always thought that the best way to accomplish something difficult is to make the pain of failure much, much worse than any pain one might encounter on the path to success. And the best way to make failure painful is to ensure that it will be tremendously, excruciatingly, and embarrassingly public. So, with that idea as the foundation for all that follows here, I have an ambition. Something that I would like to accomplish, but for which there is no guarantee of success and every likelihood that I will fail. As I work towards that goal I intend to document my progress here for the edification and entertainment of all who may be interested, but also to prevent myself from back pedaling, loafing, gold-bricking or otherwise avoiding the task at hand. Babe Ruth pointing at the bleachers it ainít, but itís the best Iíve got.

    My ambition is one that I have come to slowly, not really knowing where I was headed. It started as a vague idea that I could really use more exercise (read "any at all"). For many years rowing was my activity of choice, and one to which I would like to return. So a few weeks ago I began thinking about the things I would need to do to get back in a boat. Time, for one thing. A suitable boat. A place to store the boat and a way to transport the boat to and from the water. All of those practical concerns needed to be resolved of course. But, and more importantly, I also needed a challenge.

    Outdoor activities are easy in the summer. Who doesnít want to get on a bicycle or go for a hike or a paddle or a row when the sun is out? And in the fall, when the afternoons turn purple and smell of wood smoke, that sharpness lends its own energy to the exercise. Then Iím happy to add a layer of fleece and keep rowing. But once the true Salish winter sets in, with that damp cold that takes up lodgings in your soul and refuses to be evicted by any number of sweaters, I tend to prefer my warm bed to a wet morning on the water. On those days a cold-averse rower is faced with the prospect of spending long hours strapped to the medieval torture device known as the ďergĒ. Of which I will say no more. Those who have experienced it know itís nature. Those who have not are better left in happy oblivion.

    I dislike the erg. Passionately. But equally I dislike rolling out of bed on dark, cold, rainy, miserable mornings and dragging a boat around the bay for ďfunĒ. So for those times I could use a little something to work for. When I was bicycling, for example, I found motivation in riding up mountain passes. Which is an activity that Iím not very well suited to. Nor is it one that I am very good at. On any given climb I was routinely the slowest rider, grinding away for hours while lighter, stronger riders receded around the curves above me. But perversely I found that my ineptitude only made my eventual arrival at the summit that much more sweet. And the memory of that feeling kept me going on the days when I really didnít want to get in the saddle for another training ride.



    I needed something similar for rowing. Something sufficiently difficult. Something maybe even a little bitÖ crazy. And where in the Pacific Northwest would one find such an activity? One that would combine distance and hardship and self-reliance with maybe a little sleep deprivation thrown in? Well, R2AK, of course, but that mountain is far too tall for me to climb. So instead I am my aim is to attempt R2AKís younger offshoot, SEVENTY48.

    Most people who have read this far will probably be familiar with this little bit of organized aquatic madness but for anyone who has somehow missed it, here is the detail: https://seventy48.com/. TL;DR. Seventy miles in 48 hours. From Pt. Defiance in Tacoma to the Port Townsend public dock by human power only. No motors. No wind assistance. No support. Paddle, pedal or row.

    So. Here I am. A bit past the mid-century mark. Not as trim as I once was. Havenít spent much time in a shell recently either. If Iím being honest I might admit that while I have quite a bit of experience rowing various types of watercraft, the majority of it was in my twenties and since then my actual time spent butt-in-seat with my hands on a pair of oars has been spotty at best. I think I have some work to do.

    First order of business, I need a boat. Actually, if you ask my wife she will tell you that quite the contrary, I need to be relieved of a boat. Or several. But letís not get tied up in trivialities. One cannot tilt at windmills on just any old horse. Where would Don Quixote be without Rocinante? Fortunately a likely boat appeared on the Bellingham craigslist a few days ago. So yesterday my son Dash and I drove up there to have a look.



    Sheís a tubby little thing isnít she? Purely recreational of course. Too short, too wide and too heavy to be even remotely competitive in any sort of race. An indifferently-sculled Maas 24 would disappear into the distance and even the middle-of-the-pack SUP-ers will probably paddle right by. But at 3:00 am when my coordination is not at its peak, and the tide rips off of Pt. No Point are churning the water into a confused mess, Iím going to want a boat that wonít dump me off if I catch an oar. And for that I think sheíll be perfect.

    Cash was exchanged and the boat was strapped to the top of my car for the ride home, which proceeded without event despite a few nervous looks through the sunroof to make sure all was still well tied-down. And this morning I took my Rocinante out for a short piece on Salmon Bay.




    Iím very rusty and out of shape. Rocinante is rigged for someone several inches shorter and with a different rowing style. The water was choppy from traffic on the Ship Canal. The entire experience was very far from any ideal vision of the solo sculler gliding across the water, leaving perfectly-spaced whirls at the release. But damn that felt good.


    And so it begins. Days until SEVENTY48, 2020: 342. Miles in the boat: 2.0. List of things to do: Endless.
    - Chris

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    South Puget Sound/summer Eastern carib./winter
    Posts
    16,810

    Default Re: Port Townsend or (probably) bust

    A 62 year old chap rowed an El Toro in the Seventy 48 !

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Posts
    3,970

    Default Re: Port Townsend or (probably) bust

    Quote Originally Posted by wizbang 13 View Post
    A 62 year old chap rowed an El Toro in the Seventy 48 !
    Seriously? An El Toro?! I had one when I was a kid. I loved sailing it but wouldn't want to row one across Green Lake, much less 70 miles straight. Guess I'm going to feel even more foolish if I fall short then
    - Chris

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    South Australia and Tasmania
    Posts
    19,282

    Default

    Ebikes are awesome.But have fun on that boat, looks very cool

    Sent from my CPH1851 using Tapatalk

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Lakebay, WA
    Posts
    838

    Default Re: Port Townsend or (probably) bust

    I have been thinking about a row boat for a while now. Have very nice pair of oars for it. My choice would be CLC Expedition Wherry. Complete kit goes for $1515-.....not sure if sliding seat goes with it - most likely not.........good for rowing in less than perfect conditions - according to CLC.
    Rocinante looks little chubby in the picture here, but sitting on the top of your car she looks slick and razor sharp! Very nice boat Chris - and the idea to do the Seventy 48 is fantastic. You can do it!!

    CLC rowing shell.jpg
    "Little Bear" 1955 Fontana 18' - 1958 Atomic 4
    1960 Skippy 12C FeatherCraft - 1947 Mercury KD4 Rocket
    " Fela " 1985 Glen L15 - 1977 Johnson 15 hp
    2016 kayak Mill Creek 13

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Posts
    3,970

    Default Re: Port Townsend or (probably) bust

    Thanks Wojo. I do like the CLC expedition wherry and also the similar boat from Colin Angus (https://angusrowboats.com/pages/expedition-rowboat) a lot. One day I may build a boat like that but right now I just want to go rowing. Rocinante will do just fine for that.
    - Chris

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Posts
    3,970

    Default Re: Port Townsend or (probably) bust

    Quote Originally Posted by wizbang 13 View Post
    A 62 year old chap rowed an El Toro in the Seventy 48 !
    Ok, it took a little searching but I found out a bit more about the El Toro rower. I was wondering because I hadn't seen that entrant in the teams list but it turns out that he wasn't even officially entered. Which makes it even more impressive in a way. Like he just woke up one morning and decided to dig out the El Toro from the back of the garage and row to Port Townsend. And to put a cap on it, the rower was a man named Bill Stange who apparently held the single handed Transpac race record for some years. Respect. I'm thinking he's a harder man than I will ever aspire to be.
    - Chris

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Kailua, HI
    Posts
    153

    Default Re: Port Townsend or (probably) bust

    Your name choice has good precedent: Steinbeck's Travels With Charlie, (the tale of his cross country travels with poodle Charlie) was done in his trusty pickup Rocinante. I like your idea, and plan, will be along for the story (in no small part owing to the quality of the writing!).
    Brian

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Posts
    3,970

    Default Re: Port Townsend or (probably) bust

    Quote Originally Posted by Boatsbgood View Post
    Your name choice has good precedent: Steinbeck's Travels With Charlie, (the tale of his cross country travels with poodle Charlie) was done in his trusty pickup Rocinante. I like your idea, and plan, will be along for the story (in no small part owing to the quality of the writing!).
    Brian
    Even better! I love Steinbeck. East of Eden has long been my favorite novel and my wife gave me this for my birthday a couple of weeks ago, which I am reading now:



    I have not read Travels with Charley yet but now it's going on my list to read after I finish The Log from the Sea of Cortez.
    - Chris

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Location
    Portland, Oregon
    Posts
    164

    Default Re: Port Townsend or (probably) bust

    Row Chris, Row!
    Tales from the land and sea: http://terrapintales.wordpress.com/

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Feb 2017
    Location
    Seattle, W.A., U.S.A
    Posts
    125

    Default Re: Port Townsend or (probably) bust

    Huh, there was an Annapolis wherry up for sale for a while on craigslist.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Posts
    3,970

    Default Re: Port Townsend or (probably) bust

    Quote Originally Posted by Bruce Bateau View Post
    Row Chris, Row!
    thanks Bruce

    Quote Originally Posted by Pelirrojo View Post
    Huh, there was an Annapolis wherry up for sale for a while on craigslist.
    Yes, I did see a couple of those for sale and I thought about it hard. I like them a lot. But in the end weight was the biggest factor in deciding on the boat I ended up with instead. Not for rowing, mind. I don't really think that it makes much of a difference at the pace I expect to be going (very slow). But among the various challenges I have to overcome on this quest, the most significant is that for well over a year now I have been trying to recover from a case of tendinitis in my left elbow. It's not too bad when I'm rowing, although I don't think it would get me to Port Townsend in its current state, but it's very difficult for me to lift anything at all. There is no way I could wrestle something as heavy as a plywood wherry onto the top of my car. Rocinante is a good 20lbs lighter than an Annapolis Wherry and she's right at the limit of what I can handle. And even then I have to remove the sliding seat unit before I can get her onto the roof rack. I don't want to haul a trailer around every time I go out so the boat had to be light enough for me to lift.

    I think I was really lucky to find Rocinante. There just aren't that many boats with her particular qualities. I wanted a wooden, sliding-seat boat and everything else is either too heavy (the Annapolis Wherry and similar craft) or too extreme (any wooden racing or training single). Rocinante is a good balance and I can't think of anything else like her that would be readily available for a reasonable price without having to build one myself.
    - Chris

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Kailua, HI
    Posts
    153

    Default Re: Port Townsend or (probably) bust

    Most excellent if you're a Steinbeck reader and engaged with the Log! Its a great tale and one you can dip into and out, or dive deep and for the duration. Critics panned it, but I think The Log has stood the test of time. "Travels With Charlie" is very different, but not so different, Steinbeck had a gift, and was able to share it. And, not to stray too far afield of your current ambition, the early passages from The Log (and a poorly recalled extra essay..I'll try to find it) was very much in line with your own thinking...ie: sometimes we need to set a task for ourselves, in order for us to be.
    BQ
    I could go on and on about Log, but for now just say that your wife is prescient, likely genius, as well as generous.
    Last edited by Boatsbgood; 07-02-2019 at 02:41 AM. Reason: cause, slow, am I

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Posts
    3,970

    Default Re: Port Townsend or (probably) bust

    Quote Originally Posted by Boatsbgood View Post
    Most excellent if you're a Steinbeck reader and engaged with the Log! Its a great tale and one you can dip into and out, or dive deep and for the duration. Critics panned it, but I think The Log has stood the test of time. "Travels With Charlie" is very different, but not so different, Steinbeck had a gift, and was able to share it. And, not to stray too far afield of your current ambition, the early passages from The Log (and a poorly recalled extra essay..I'll try to find it) was very much in line with your own thinking...ie: sometimes we need to set a task for ourselves, in order for us to be.
    BQ
    I could go on and on about Log, but for now just say that your wife is prescient, likely genius, as well as generous.
    That's what I am finding as well. Many wonderful passages about boats, water, the nature of expeditions, &c. that I expect to come back to many times over. A great read, and perfectly timed!
    - Chris

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Posts
    3,970

    Default Re: Port Townsend or (probably) bust

    I've been musing on the subject of sleep. In my experience the biggest question in any multi-day endurance effort is whether to rest or keep going. In that respect I think Seventy 48 might be easier than some events. In bicycle randonneuring, for example, the rides ("brevets" and "permanents") have control points that the riders must pass through at certain times. Miss the closing time for a control and you are disqualified. If you get behind then you will be chasing the control point time window the entire ride. The clock doesn't stop at night so only the fast riders get to rest. Slow riders like me just have to keep slogging on through the night. Seventy 48, on the other hand, just mandates a start time and a finish cutoff. With very few restrictions, how each participant uses the time in between is up to them.

    Of course a rower has a few factors to contend with that a bicyclist does not. Tides create their own control points. Missing a favorable current means hours of creeping forward while the entire mass of the ocean is moving the other way, frustrating all attempts at progress. Time to find a friendly beach and wait until slack water. Wind and waves can - and most likely will - slow the boat, throwing off all of the careful plans made in the solid and predictable environs of the shore. One may set out in happy expectation of making some landmark by such and such a time only to find that the headwind is taking a full knot off of the boat speed. Progress drags. Weary arms and back protest at the long hours. Pauses for food, or the removal or addition of a sweater, or to attend to other necessary business, grow longer. And all the while your hypothetical rendezvous with that point on the chart is slipping ever further into the future.

    Weather, too, plays a larger role on the water. Seventy 48 takes place in early June, when the weather in the Pacific Northwest can be anything from warm sun and tender breezes to force 8 on the Beaufort scale, whitecaps on the Sound, horizontal rain, and temperatures more suitable for thick socks, a cup of coffee and a good book than for setting out upon a long voyage in a small boat. But set out we must, assuming that the conditions are not so dire that our loved ones will fear for our safe return. Pain, cold, and discomfort are temporary. Glory is eternal! Or what little glory there is to be had in bringing up the tail end of the fleet at least. I’m keeping my expectations realistic.

    As voyagers, we plot our various courses knowing we will contend with wind, tide, and the fickle nature of the sea, and that our ultimate track will look nothing like the expedition that we so carefully mapped out weeks or months in advance. But the endurance athlete is an optimistic sort. We acknowledge the chance of weather and other adversity, but more in the abstract than in real expectation. Publicly we may voice dire predictions as to the state of the barometer and the likelihood of hail or thunderstorms, but we do so only in appeasement, lest the gods suspect us of hubris and strike us down. In our unconscious selves we anticipate the warm breezes, and we plan accordingly.

    (Note how I casually use the plural “we” when referring to endurance athletes, as if by association with that group I can assume some of its qualities.) In truth my abilities are weighted far more toward the endurance side of that definition than the athlete side. I’ve never been a strong cyclist. I’m terrible on climbs. I’ll get dropped off the back of any pace line. But through bicycling I have learned that there is only one absolute requirement to finishing an endurance event: Just don’t stop. It’s that simple. If you keep going you will eventually finish. Not near the head of the pack of course. Maybe even embarrassingly last, long after the majority of the finishers have packed up and gone home. But you will get there and that is an accomplishment in itself.

    And so back to the topic of sleep, its restorative powers vs. the time it subtracts from forward progress, and its seductive pull in the period between midnight and dawn. Next year Seventy 48 starts at nineteen hundred hours. That’s seven o’clock in the evening for those of us who operate on twelve-hour time, meaning that it will be near dark by the time we enter Colvos Passage up the west side of Vashon Island. Since we are counting on mild weather, a full moon rising after sunset, and a friendly ebb tide, the first few hours will pass easily enough. I imagine phosphorescence dripping off of the oars as they glissade across the water on the return, the harsh croak of a heron echoing off of the trees on the shore, satin ripples of moonlight. That’s a lovely vision to be sure, and one to keep a hold of for motivation. But by 2:00 am or so the romance will have worn off and the small, reasonable voice that we all possess will begin to submit its rationales for stopping. “Sleep now and start out well-rested after the sun is up.” “Your boat speed is dropping off. You will be faster after a few hours in a nice, soft, warm sleeping bag.” And so on. After so many long hours in the saddle that voice is an old friend and I know all of its stratagems well.

    Right about then we will be nearing Blake Island, with a handy campground just at hand. Do I stop? It will be very tempting. But the tide does not wait! Slack water at Blake Island will be at 3:47 am, followed by seven full hours of lovely ebb current up the Sound. Keep going and it would be possible to make Port Townsend Canal before the tail of the ebb and finish by noon on Saturday. Miss that window and I will either be battling a three-knot-plus current through the Canal or waiting out the flood for another six hours. If I row straight through at an average speed of 4kts, I could finish in around 16 hours. That’s a long time but I’ve gone for longer stretches without sleep on a bicycle before. From the comfort of my living room it appears doable. Whether it will seem so from the vastly different vantage point of a small boat in the middle of the night may be another thing entirely.
    - Chris

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Location
    St. Helens, Oregon
    Posts
    1,955

    Default Re: Port Townsend or (probably) bust

    Sounds like a great plan! Then there's that saying: "There's the plan and there's what actually happens". May your plan and reality become congruent

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Posts
    3,970

    Default Re: Port Townsend or (probably) bust

    Quote Originally Posted by Hugh MacD View Post
    Sounds like a great plan! Then there's that saying: "There's the plan and there's what actually happens". May your plan and reality become congruent
    Thanks Hugh
    - Chris

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Feb 2017
    Location
    Seattle, W.A., U.S.A
    Posts
    125

    Default Re: Port Townsend or (probably) bust

    Sounds all very rationally thought out, including boat choice. Good luck and watch out for the tendonitis, I have had it in both wrists.

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Posts
    3,970

    Default Re: Port Townsend or (probably) bust

    For anyone not familiar with the route of Seventy 48 or the Puget Sound region in general, here is the relevant chart and course. From the bottom, we set out from Tacoma through Commencement Bay and up Colvos Passage between Vashon Island and the Kitsap Peninsula. At the north end of Colvos the route crosses the Southworth ferry route and then proceeds past Blake Island, crossing the Bremerton and Bainbridge ferry routes, and up the east side of Bainbridge Island. The purple dotted lines down the middle of Puget Sound mark the Vessel Traffic Service lanes, which are forbidden for Seventy 48 participants. Entering them is an automatic disqualification.

    From Bainbridge we cross the entrance to Port Madison and then up past Apple Cove Pt to Pt. No Point. Depending on the state of the tides and the wind, conditions at Pt. No Point can vary from flat calm to the proverbial millrace. I've been through the tide rips here many times in larger craft but never in a pulling boat so the passage here may be challenging.

    Past Pt. No Point we proceed to Foulweather Bluff and then across the entrance of Hood Canal, a channel frequently used by submarines transiting to and from the Bangor Naval Base. Something to watch out for, but with luck and planning it should be daylight for this part of the trip. From there we enter Oak Bay and into the narrow Port Townsend Canal between Indian Island and the Peninsula. The current through here can exceed 3kts so it's a passage that you want to make at slack water or with the ebb. And then on to the final leg to Port Townsend, fame, glory, adulation, and sleep, most wonderful sleep. Likely face-down on the nearest patch of grass.


    - Chris

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  20. #20
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Ballard
    Posts
    8,391

    Default Re: Port Townsend or (probably) bust

    Similar idea ... I'd like to build or buy a Colin Angus Expedition rowboat. I built a Pygmy Coho kayak a few years back but I'm really not a paddler. Great design (Coho), poor paddler (me). Rowing is just much more natural.

    BTW, shout out for the Washington Water Trails, who make little boat travel like this that much more do-able these days. Check out their Cascade Marine Trail maps .... https://www.wwta.org/water-trails/ca...-marine-trail/
    Quote Originally Posted by James McMullen View Post
    Yeadon is right, of course.

  21. #21
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Posts
    3,970

    Default Re: Port Townsend or (probably) bust

    Quote Originally Posted by Yeadon View Post
    Similar idea ... I'd like to build or buy a Colin Angus Expedition rowboat. I built a Pygmy Coho kayak a few years back but I'm really not a paddler. Great design (Coho), poor paddler (me). Rowing is just much more natural.

    BTW, shout out for the Washington Water Trails, who make little boat travel like this that much more do-able these days. Check out their Cascade Marine Trail maps .... https://www.wwta.org/water-trails/ca...-marine-trail/
    Re: rowing vs. paddling. That's what I have found as well. I have tried kayaking and will do so again but I'm far more comfortable traveling backwards. Make of that what you will. I like the Angus Expedition boat a lot too. It's basically a sea kayak for rowers. What's not to like about that?

    And thanks for the link to the Cascadia Marine Trail! I had forgotten about it and it's a great resource for Seventy 48.
    - Chris

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  22. #22
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Posts
    3,970

    Default Re: Port Townsend or (probably) bust

    Got out on the Ship Canal again today.



    Not a long row. Just three (nautical) miles, from the 14th street boat launch through the Fremont Cut and back, but I have to start somewhere. And a speedometer app on my iPhone showed a pretty constant 5 kts. Not fast, but fast enough. If I can keep that average while gradually upping the distance over the next few months I think I'll be in good shape.
    - Chris

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  23. #23
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Location
    St. Helens, Oregon
    Posts
    1,955

    Default Re: Port Townsend or (probably) bust

    Nice! Keep after it!

  24. #24
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Posts
    3,970

    Default Re: Port Townsend or (probably) bust

    Got out on Puget Sound for the first time today. Launched from the beach at Golden Gardens at 10:15 am and rowed to Pt. Wells, about 5.5 nm north and then back to Shilshole, arriving at 1:15 pm for a total distance of 11 nm in exactly 3 hours. It was a great day on the water. Clear skies, no wind, and just enough in the way of boat and shipping wakes to keep things interesting.



    Including water breaks and a few minutes for a snack at Pt. Wells my average was around 3.7 kt but actual speed on the water was mostly between 4 kt-5 kt. I left right at low tide so was rowing out against the flood and back with it. Didn't notice much effect on speed though. 11 nm is longer than I've sculled in a very, very long time. Like twenty five years long. I'm happy that I was able to do that distance but it's possible that I may have overdone things. I'm going to feel it tomorrow. In fact I'm not entirely confident that I will be able to get up from the chair I'm sitting in right now...

    But and however, I did learn a few things:

    1. I might need a trailer after all. My ability to load the boat onto the roof rack solo is marginal when I'm not exhausted. I had to sit for a while after I got back before I could get the boat back onto the car when I was done and even then it was a bit of a struggle. Not ideal.

    2. Launching from the beach is not that easy. Well, the actual launching part was fine. The hard part is getting the boat down to the water. I have a dolly but even so it was a chore to roll the boat from the parking lot down the beach and even more so on the way back up. A bow eye and a strap would help a lot though.



    3. Three guys trolling in a skiff, you'd think that one of them would be looking where they are going. But that would be incorrect. I avoided them ok but I am now adding a mirror to my list of equipment. Too many boats out there and none of them are expecting to see a rowing shell so a good lookout is critical.

    4. Bring a hat! I had sunscreen, but a hat would have been nice.
    - Chris

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  25. #25
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    South Puget Sound/summer Eastern carib./winter
    Posts
    16,810

    Default Re: Port Townsend or (probably) bust

    Chris, I started wearing one of those face mask thingies this past winter. They adjust all over the place.
    I dislike wearing a big brim hat. One of the things with a baseball cap does a great job. Sun, rain, wind, hot or cold.
    They work (and look) great !

  26. #26
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Posts
    3,970

    Default Re: Port Townsend or (probably) bust

    Thanks Bruce. Yes, a baseball cap would have been perfect. Just something to keep the sun out of my eyes. Oh, and sunglasses! I neglected to get sunglasses the last time I got new prescription glasses so I've been going without for a couple of years now. Which is generally ok up here in the gray PNW but it's definitely time to get a new pair.
    - Chris

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  27. #27
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    South Puget Sound/summer Eastern carib./winter
    Posts
    16,810

    Default Re: Port Townsend or (probably) bust


  28. #28
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Posts
    3,970

    Default Re: Port Townsend or (probably) bust

    Ah - now I see what you mean. Hm. I see the appeal in keeping off sun, wind, etc., but I'm not sure how much I would like something like that for rowing. I get warm enough as it is.
    - Chris

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  29. #29
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    Eugene, Oregon
    Posts
    134

    Default Re: Port Townsend or (probably) bust

    Quote Originally Posted by cstevens View Post
    Ah - now I see what you mean. Hm. I see the appeal in keeping off sun, wind, etc., but I'm not sure how much I would like something like that for rowing. I get warm enough as it is.
    I thought for sure I was gonna become a victim of Piracy when I saw this apparition approaching me in Hale Passage during the Salish 100!
    Attached Images Attached Images

  30. #30
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    South Puget Sound/summer Eastern carib./winter
    Posts
    16,810

    Default Re: Port Townsend or (probably) bust

    I started wearing it in the boatyard in the Caribbean. I was working all day long in the sun on a friends boat. Many are light weight , they keep you cool, not get you hot.

  31. #31
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Posts
    3,970

    Default Re: Port Townsend or (probably) bust

    Ok. It does seem like a better alternative to skin cancer. But as John K. points out, they also inspire a sort of "lock up your liquor and women" response on the part of innocent seafarers I'll have to try one for myself and see how I like it I guess.
    - Chris

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  32. #32
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    PNW, an island west of Seattle
    Posts
    2,141

    Default Re: Port Townsend or (probably) bust

    Chris, I totally endorse the rear view mirror idea. I recently added one to my HV13 that I row. It helps a lot. I think I can continue to get by with having the mirror on only one side but in a more crowded place I think I'd add a second one on the, now, blind side. Or, go with a high one over the middle.

    Bruce... thanks for the endorsement of the face shield. I must admit my skepticism on their wearability. But your boatyard use is as good a recommendation as it gets.

    Jeff

  33. #33
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Posts
    3,970

    Default Re: Port Townsend or (probably) bust

    Quote Originally Posted by jpatrick View Post
    Chris, I totally endorse the rear view mirror idea. I recently added one to my HV13 that I row. It helps a lot. I think I can continue to get by with having the mirror on only one side but in a more crowded place I think I'd add a second one on the, now, blind side. Or, go with a high one over the middle.

    Bruce... thanks for the endorsement of the face shield. I must admit my skepticism on their wearability. But your boatyard use is as good a recommendation as it gets.

    Jeff
    Any photos Jeff? What sort of mirror did you use? I've been looking at different setups and am leaning toward one that mounts to the oarlock pin on the outrigger. I'd rather have one that mounts to the hull but so far I haven't found anything that seems like it would work. I've thought about just making something using a motorcycle mirror or a towing mirror but it would be great to see what other people are doing.
    - Chris

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  34. #34
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    South Puget Sound/summer Eastern carib./winter
    Posts
    16,810

    Default Re: Port Townsend or (probably) bust

    This was just before I got one. I passed out twice from dehydration/sunstroke.


    The local guys were using them. Crazy hot nasty dredged yard.

  35. #35
    Join Date
    Jun 2019
    Location
    Bellingham, WA, USA
    Posts
    612

    Default Re: Port Townsend or (probably) bust

    Another vote for the face shields, or buffs as other companies call them. I have several; light colored single layers for hot weather, and fleece lined for cold weather.

    The hot weather ones do not trap any heat or moisture if there is even a hint of a breeze and keep all the sun off.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •