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Thread: Folk Boat and alternatives

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2018
    Location
    Belfast, Northern ireland
    Posts
    1

    Default Folk Boat and alternatives

    Hello All.

    I am considering a boat for next season and at the moment a Folkboat is making a good case, however, I have time and I value opinions therefore I would welcome opinions advice and views from owners of folkboats and any alternatives.

    all boats that are within my budget are a compromise, therefore I am looking for the best combination of:


    • Seaworthy and safe - the boat will be sailed along the north coast of Ireland with at least one extended (1 to 2 week) cruise along the West coast of Scotland per season by me and my wife who are relative novices.
    • Enough interior space to be comfortable for 2 large adults (both over 6 foot) and a dog for a 1 - 2 week cruise. (we are both used to extended tent camping so it doesn't need to be a palace).
    • The boat will only be used for cruising, a combination of day sailing, weekenders with the odd extended trip. It does not need to be fast (it will never be raced) but must make enough progress to be useful for passage making and hops to the next bay over.
    • Minimal maintenance (relative to wooden boats) I love wooden boats, and we all look on them romantically but I am realistic in that the maintenance will be viewed as a chore, and I am fairly lazy.
    • Enough cockpit space for 3 adults on a daysail.
    • Preferable inboard engine with generator, though would tolerate an electric start outboard which can charge.


    CHEAP. The boat needs to be beneath 7000 and require no major work At the moment solid examples of Folkboats can be had for less than 5000 (with a bit of haggling). This think 7000 should be able to get a fairly good example ready for a season.
    Last edited by wanzap1; 06-28-2019 at 10:03 AM.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 1999
    Location
    Hyannis, MA, USA
    Posts
    47,363

    Default Re: Folk Boat and alternatives

    You might look to the Folk Boat's larger cousin, the Kings Cruiser 28. There are a number of larger fin keel glass boats under the Kings Cruiser name. The Kings Cruiser 28 is wood, tight seam, full keel, fractional rig.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 1999
    Location
    Hyannis, MA, USA
    Posts
    47,363

    Default Re: Folk Boat and alternatives

    Note to livability: In the mid '60s we had a Pearson Electra, a lovely Alberg design of 22'. A cockpit awning makes an enormous difference. I hit on a sort of quonset hut structure held up by ash slats sewn into each panel seam. I could have the whole thing in a shallow arc if not much wind, or close to a half circle arc with the sides down almost to the gunnels. I could set it higher or lower. I stowed it rolled around the slats - a bundle about 9' long - and lashed to the deck along the cabin trunk and cockpit coaming.

    Dodgers were very rare back then and involved more expense and clutter. When sailing, I don't mind wearing proper oilies and being in the rain, but at anchor it's nice to enjoy the cockpit. And on a summer's rain with no wind, there's nothing like having the arc of the awning shallow so the harbor view can be enjoyed while the rain runoff makes a nice pattern of drops around the boat.
    Last edited by Ian McColgin; 06-28-2019 at 06:33 AM.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Port Townsend WA
    Posts
    12,701

    Default Re: Folk Boat and alternatives

    You might also consider one of Lyle Hess's smaller designs such as "Renegade" or "Serrafyn" which was the design of Lynn and Larry Pardey's first boat. This is a twenty four foot design that is based on the well known Bristol Channel Cutters that are world famous for their stability and seaworthiness! The design has a full keel and an out board rudder which allows the boat to be grounded, without damage, in areas that are subject to extreme tidal changes. This is a fast, trim and comfortable little cruiser that can take you anywhere you wish to go in the world both in style and comfort.
    Here is one that was up for sale in 2015.
    https://www.sailboatlistings.com/view/51107
    Jay
    Last edited by Jay Greer; 06-28-2019 at 12:22 PM.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Falmouth England.
    Posts
    406

    Default Re: Folk Boat and alternatives

    Seeing where you are I think the supply of Lyle Hess boats may regrettably be limited. Folkboats fine but might be cramped. Perhaps a size larger such as a Holman Stella or Sterling, or a small Buchanan. All readily available with UK brokers.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    West Wales, UK
    Posts
    522

    Default Re: Folk Boat and alternatives

    Deben or Hillyard 4 Tonners, the larger Blackwater Sloops, Cape Cutter 21, Golant Gaffer, the larger Finesse ...... There are plenty of designs out there to suit your needs.
    I know this because our list of needs is very similar and I spent several years looking around before deciding on a Deben 4 Tonners - only to find that it's probably not (though very similar). There was a very nice Hillyard for sale in Holyhead, which I think is still on the market.
    Nick

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Norwich,United Kingdom
    Posts
    6,388

    Default Re: Folk Boat and alternatives

    I suggest the OP finds a Folkboat that is for sale and goes below with his wife and dog.It may seem less spacious than a tent,in spite of being more seaworthy than the tent.British brokers are listing hundreds of small cruisers and there is a huge amount of choice.Something like a Westerly Centaur would have a lot more living space and the reassurance of an inboard diesel.

  8. #8

    Default Re: Folk Boat and alternatives

    Quote Originally Posted by wanzap1 View Post
    Hello All.

    I am considering a boat for next season and at the moment a Folkboat is making a good case, however, I have time and I value opinions therefore I would welcome opinions advice and views from owners of folkboats and any alternatives.

    all boats that are within my budget are a compromise, therefore I am looking for the best combination of:


    • Seaworthy and safe - the boat will be sailed along the north coast of Ireland with at least one extended (1 to 2 week) cruise along the West coast of Scotland per season by me and my wife who are relative novices.
    • Enough interior space to be comfortable for 2 large adults (both over 6 foot) and a dog for a 1 - 2 week cruise. (we are both used to extended tent camping so it doesn't need to be a palace).
    • The boat will only be used for cruising, a combination of day sailing, weekenders with the odd extended trip. It does not need to be fast (it will never be raced) but must make enough progress to be useful for passage making and hops to the next bay over.
    • Minimal maintenance (relative to wooden boats) I love wooden boats, and we all look on them romantically but I am realistic in that the maintenance will be viewed as a chore, and I am fairly lazy.
    • Enough cockpit space for 3 adults on a daysail.
    • Preferable inboard engine with generator, though would tolerate an electric start outboard which can charge.


    CHEAP. The boat needs to be beneath 7000 and require no major work At the moment solid examples of Folkboats can be had for less than 5000 (with a bit of haggling). This think 7000 should be able to get a fairly good example ready for a season.
    Folkboats are beautiful to sail, seaworthy and look after you well. Also fast for their size. Many have an inboard diesel which does take up room, but for cruising should give 6 knots which is enough to go places and punch through currents. Find as good a one as you possibly can as not a lot of difference in price between a really good one and one that is so so.

    If you want similar sailing qualities but slightly more room then Contessa 26 is well worth a look, albeit made of the unmentionable. There are plenty of other 26 / 28 ft plastic floating caravans out there for not much money. But the may have more living room, but as a boat to love?

    folkboats have standing headroom when hatches are open. An awning or Boom tent makes a huge difference to livability. This gives you the cockpit as a usable space even when west coast of Scotland is typically west coast.

    I haven't cruised mine far, but that is more because East Coast of Scotland is great day sailing but 30 plus miles before next good place. I have spent a few days aboard at a time with wife, daughter and hound. First 24 hours are a bit maddening, but you quickly get into to the rythm of being on board a small boat.
    Last edited by FB 539; 06-30-2019 at 07:48 AM.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Gold Coast Australia
    Posts
    2,777

    Default Re: Folk Boat and alternatives

    If you like the folk boat have a look at the Jeremy Rogers Contessa 26 there ought to be quite a number still sailing South of you.

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