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Thread: Lowell Sailing Surf Dory 16'

  1. #106
    Join Date
    May 2010
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    Central, NJ USA
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    334

    Default Re: Lowell Sailing Surf Dory 16'

    Floorboards are done.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  2. #107
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Sound Beach, NY
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    4,118

    Default Re: Lowell Sailing Surf Dory 16'

    Nicely.

  3. #108
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Central, NJ USA
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    334

    Default Re: Lowell Sailing Surf Dory 16'

    Thanks. That's the problem with having a nice boat. Everything I do to it has to measure up. Let's see how long that lasts.

  4. #109
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Location
    Avon Lake, Ohio USA
    Posts
    421

    Default Re: Lowell Sailing Surf Dory 16'

    Looks great Alan. I bet the construction techniques are just a bit different from those of a Mini Stick. Which reminds me, I need to hit you up for some more OS film. But I digress. Seriously, beautiful boat. Its been a treat to see your progress throughout the summer.

    CG

  5. #110
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    northwestern Wisconsin
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    5,271

    Default Re: Lowell Sailing Surf Dory 16'

    Looks great!

    Tom
    You don't have to be prepared as long as you're willing to suffer the consequences.

    www.tompamperin.com

  6. #111
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Waterbury, Connecticut
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    2,105

    Default Re: Lowell Sailing Surf Dory 16'

    Quote Originally Posted by WI-Tom View Post
    I believe he posted elsewhere that this video was the first and only time he bothered to use a boom at all--if I remember right, he said there wasn't any real advantage to it, and it wasn't worth the hassle.

    I agree with that assessment myself, having done a bit of experimenting with my own boomless standing lug. But others with a lot of experience (John Hartman on his Ilur, for example) have used sprit booms and really like them.

    Tom
    --- Interesting. Is there some advantage to NOT having a traveler rope or bar for this rig? Would it be possible to use a traveler here to reduce the additional step of shifting the sheet over? -- Wade

  7. #112
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    Jan 2009
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    northwestern Wisconsin
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    5,271

    Default Re: Lowell Sailing Surf Dory 16'

    Quote Originally Posted by wtarzia View Post
    --- Interesting. Is there some advantage to NOT having a traveler rope or bar for this rig? Would it be possible to use a traveler here to reduce the additional step of shifting the sheet over? -- Wade
    Well, with a boomless sail, the sheeting angle is critical--the sheet needs to follow a line that bisects the throat and clew of the sail, and continues on that same line to the gunwale. The mainsail of a small boat must (usually) be sheeted as far aft, AND as far outboard, as possible.

    So, while a traveler can work (I usually use a metal ring threaded on a line), it depends. On my Alaska, the height of the tiller is such that I need a fair amount of slack in the traveler. With that much slack in the line, the metal ring will not slide all the way outboard to create the proper sheeting angle. I thought about using a rigid bar for a traveler, but I don't like to install hardware I don't need, and clutter up the aft deck. That is probably why the traditional method of sheeting boomless sails like this is to manually shift the sheet from side to side at each tack.

    That seems like a potential problem, but in practice I've found it to be a very simple, cheap system that uses very little hardware. While the boat is tacking, it's no problem to shift the sheet over at all. Works far better than a traveler would work on my boat with the current set-up. And FAR FAR FAR better (in my opinion) than a double-sided mainsheet, which would be another option.

    For me, the less line cluttering the cockpit, the better.

    The trade-off, of course, is that you can't ease the sail out very far at all (but somehow I still manage better than hull speed on a broad reach in real wind), and you can't flatten the sail much either. Then, the OTHER trade-off is that you don't need to flatten the sail so much to depower it, because the extreme twist of the boomless rig already does that for you.

    Tom
    You don't have to be prepared as long as you're willing to suffer the consequences.

    www.tompamperin.com

  8. #113
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Waterbury, Connecticut
    Posts
    2,105

    Default Re: Lowell Sailing Surf Dory 16'

    Quote Originally Posted by WI-Tom View Post
    Well, with a boomless sail, the sheeting angle is critical--the sheet needs to follow a line that bisects the throat and clew of the sail, and continues on that same line to the gunwale. The mainsail of a small boat must (usually) be sheeted as far aft, AND as far outboard, as possible.

    So, while a traveler can work (I usually use a metal ring threaded on a line), it depends. On my Alaska, the height of the tiller is such that I need a fair amount of slack in the traveler. With that much slack in the line, the metal ring will not slide all the way outboard to create the proper sheeting angle. I thought about using a rigid bar for a traveler, but I don't like to install hardware I don't need, and clutter up the aft deck. That is probably why the traditional method of sheeting boomless sails like this is to manually shift the sheet from side to side at each tack.

    That seems like a potential problem, but in practice I've found it to be a very simple, cheap system that uses very little hardware. While the boat is tacking, it's no problem to shift the sheet over at all. Works far better than a traveler would work on my boat with the current set-up. And FAR FAR FAR better (in my opinion) than a double-sided mainsheet, which would be another option.

    For me, the less line cluttering the cockpit, the better.

    The trade-off, of course, is that you can't ease the sail out very far at all (but somehow I still manage better than hull speed on a broad reach in real wind), and you can't flatten the sail much either. Then, the OTHER trade-off is that you don't need to flatten the sail so much to depower it, because the extreme twist of the boomless rig already does that for you.

    Tom
    --- Thanks for the good explanation. i suppose the other good-tradeoff is that there is no boom to trip the boat. -- Wade

  9. #114
    Join Date
    Jan 2000
    Location
    Cushing, Maine
    Posts
    3,822

    Default Re: Lowell Sailing Surf Dory 16'

    On RANTAN's loose footed standing lug, the rope traveler has a pair of knots. The lower block is fastened to the traveler using a caribiner which is set out board of the knots to get my sheeting angle. I do have to switch it on the tacks. I have experimented with the fore and aft position which is simple if you have a open gunwale or space behind your seat's rail. I have mine coming out from under the seat to keep it low in the boat. I didn't need the additional outboard spacing. The traveler is removable so it isn't in the way for rowing or when you need an open cockpit. An additional major advantage of loose footed: no boom to hit you in the head.

    My leech is very vertical so that the main sheet controls sag pretty well and I have a powerful downhaul, low stretch halyard and a stiff mast.
    Ben Fuller
    Ran Tan, Liten Kuhling, Tipsy, Tippy, Josef W., Merry Mouth, Imp, Macavity, Look Far, Flash and a quiver of other 'yaks.
    "Bound fast is boatless man."

  10. #115
    Join Date
    Nov 2019
    Location
    McMinnville, Oregon, usa
    Posts
    2

    Default Re: Lowell Sailing Surf Dory 16'

    I recently aquired a Chesepeke Bay Northwestern Dory in 90% completion. I want to know where to place my oarlocks. I would like to ask this question to the entire group but cannot figure out how to post to the forum. This is my first post, I'm new.
    I'm tall and suspect I would benefit fron risers and a slightly forward position than the average rower.

  11. #116
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Salt Spring Island, BC
    Posts
    6,887

    Default Re: Lowell Sailing Surf Dory 16'

    Quote Originally Posted by Aftru View Post
    I recently aquired a Chesepeke Bay Northwestern Dory in 90% completion. I want to know where to place my oarlocks. I would like to ask this question to the entire group but cannot figure out how to post to the forum. This is my first post, I'm new.
    I'm tall and suspect I would benefit fron risers and a slightly forward position than the average rower.
    Click on "Forum".

    Select "Building/Repair".

    Click on "Post New Thread".

    And to answer your question, mount the oarlocks on something that you can clamp in various positions and move it around until you find the sweet spot. You may also want an adjustable stretcher to brace your feet against.

  12. #117
    Join Date
    Apr 1999
    Location
    Hyannis, MA, USA
    Posts
    48,725

    Default Re: Lowell Sailing Surf Dory 16'

    I like to locate the risers such that the thwart will allow me to sit upright, upper arms vertical and lower arms horizontal and the oars exactly horizontal out.

    Fore and aft location should be such that the boat trims well allowing you to row across the wind easily. This means that the center of weight - you, gear, passenger(s) - should be a tad aft of amidships. I'd place one thwart maybe 6" aft of the center of the boat. That would be the rowing station solo or with two passengers. I'd put a thwart forward of that as close as consistent with getting your legs under the solo rowing thwart without harming your shins. This will let you balance the boat with one passenger and a picnic basket.

    If you're not already a strong rower, use the electronic index to find the article about "the doryman's stroke". A most seadog approach to rowing this boat.

    I row in open water and thus prefer open top oarlocks.

    G'luck

  13. #118
    Join Date
    Nov 2019
    Location
    McMinnville, Oregon, usa
    Posts
    2

    Default Re: Lowell Sailing Surf Dory 16'

    Thank you so much. I am a novice. A neophyte, an amateur. Any advice appreciated. I am 6'4" tall and 225 # so placement is important. Thanks, again.

  14. #119
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Central, NJ USA
    Posts
    334

    Default Re: Lowell Sailing Surf Dory 16'

    Just an update: had her out a few more times. The new floor is very creamy for sitting, but I need a little padding on the bench edges! Maybe some copper pipe insulation from HD.

    As far as the lack of traveler, I don't really miss it. The mainsheet comes off the rudder at the centerline of the boat. I've just been easing the mainsheet out to where I think it should be and then wrapping it around a cleat on the windward side for some leverage in holding it fast. I can work it in and out from there until I tack. I don't have any telltales yet and the mast is still twisting in the step, which blocks the wind vane from view. I'm been just winging it as I'm not interested in squeezing every last milli-knot out of her.

    I'm planning on bringing her to this years SRR and any other events that I can squeeze into my schedule. I'll be more than open to ideas about improving her rigging. At the vary least, I need some cam cleats for the jib.

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