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Thread: Small Boat on the Inside Passage

  1. #36
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
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    Portland, Oregon
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    115

    Default Re: Small Boat on the Inside Passage

    Lots of good advice and offers here folks. Thank you. A few responses:

    VHF. I have two- they are so much a part of the kit, that I forgot to mention them, though I won't forget to use them! Thank you for the reminder. A key piece of equipment for weather and communication.

    Socked in. Well worth considering. I have been warned (and probably need to be reminded again) and will plan for that. I don't want to go out in adverse weather beyond a certain point. I'm not a fan of fog either, but will do what I can to be safe.

    Horns. I have a manual air horn (Sea Dog's metal one) that has a good sharp toot. I've also been advised to get a nice canister one too with deep loud sound to scare of bears. Makes sense to me. Anyone have a horn that they'd recommend?

    Fish. Catch, kill, eat, share; make friends with everyone but the fish! If I can find the room, I will round up fishing gear.

    Batteries. My VHFs both need a charger, as do all my cameras. Drats. What new VHF works on batteries? I'd like to know.

    Blogs. I am also a journal keeper- I have ship log, as well as a sketch journal for each day. I wrote an article about my log over at ThreeSheetsNW.
    Tales from the land and sea: http://terrapintales.wordpress.com/

  2. #37
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Helena, Montana
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    139

    Default Re: Small Boat on the Inside Passage

    Quote Originally Posted by Bruce Bateau View Post
    Batteries. My VHFs both need a charger, as do all my cameras. Drats. What new VHF works on batteries? I'd like to know.
    Standard Horizon HX300. Nice unit. Buy battery cage separate.

  3. #38
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    8,485

    Default Re: Small Boat on the Inside Passage

    Batteries. My VHFs both need a charger, as do all my cameras. Drats. What new VHF works on batteries? I'd like to know.
    My last boat had a 60W solar panel feeding a AGM battery and that was more than enough to run lights, charge my devices, and even run the autohelm from time to time.

    For my current project I'm cutting back to a 20W panel feeding a lithium all-purpose battery unit that has a variety of outputs (they sell them as "generators" - silly). I won't have an autohelm so I think this will be adequate. What's nice here is that the size and weight of the equipment is fraction of the old setup. A portable, fold-up solar panel could be spread out when conditions were good. The battery, which is full of electronics, would need to be in a dry place, of course. But this might be better than carrying bags of batteries.

    FYI, my Standard Horizon VHF will take either a rechargeable battery pack or one that takes AAs. You can swap them back and forth easily.

    Sounds like a fantastic trip.
    -Dave

  4. #39
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Lake Norman,North Carolina and Cedarville, Michigan
    Posts
    238

    Default Re: Small Boat on the Inside Passage

    The Cobra Marine HH600 VHF comes with an optional AA battery tray too. It is also DSC capable. Added to my kit this year, but honestly haven't got too much experience with it yet to review for you.

    Looking forward to reading more about this year's trip. Thanks.

  5. #40
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Rockport, Maine
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    354

    Default Re: Small Boat on the Inside Passage

    Consider a VHF radio with DSC and built in GPS, not just DSC. Portable units with these features are now available. In an emergency the radio can broadcast an emergency message with location without needed to be connected to an external GPS. While the Inside Passage has few shore stations there is a steady traffic of boats and larger vessels which should be monitoring VHF.

    Portable VHF radios usually automatically switch to reduce power settings when using AA batteries.'

    Consider how quickly an anchor will reset when tidal current or wind reverses. An anchor with higher theoretical holding power isn't much good if it does not reset after the boat swings around.

  6. #41
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Salt Spring Island, BC
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    6,211

    Default Re: Small Boat on the Inside Passage

    [QUOTE=David Cockey;5912641]Consider a VHF radio with DSC and built in GPS, not just DSC. Portable units with these features are now available.

    Oooh, I like that. Thank you Davey Crockett (that's how I first read your name, kind of a flash back to my youth). Now I just need to learn about DSC.

  7. #42
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    East Quogue,NY
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    17,666

    Default

    [QUOTE=Gib Etheridge;5912667]
    Quote Originally Posted by David Cockey View Post
    Consider a VHF radio with DSC and built in GPS, not just DSC. Portable units with these features are now available.

    Oooh, I like that. Thank you Davey Crockett (that's how I first read your name, kind of a flash back to my youth). Now I just need to learn about DSC.


    You'll need to register with NOAA, OR Canadian equivalent,and get what is called an, MMSI number. That, coupled with a GPS/DSC radio gives you one-touch SOS capability, that broadcasts your position and a distress signal automatically. Can be picked up my authorities, and any other boat equipped with DSC VHF.

    Most newer VHF radios are DSC. Many owners neglect to get an MMSI, however. Still, its a great asset.

    Kevin






    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
    There are two kinds of boaters: those who have run aground, and those who lie about it.

  8. #43
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
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    Portland, Oregon
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    Default Re: Small Boat on the Inside Passage


    This one might be good for a photo caption contest.
    Tales from the land and sea: http://terrapintales.wordpress.com/

  9. #44
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Location
    Portland, Oregon
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    115

    Default Re: Small Boat on the Inside Passage

    And now looking at the picture myself, it might be:

    1. Every wooden thing needs to be white with a green stripe or green with a white stripe.

    2. That boat finally did him in.

    3. Obsessive compulsion gone awry.

    If you chose #3, you'd be correct.

    My boat is painted with Pettit Easypoxy topsides paint on the top and the bottom. I understand a lot of small boats are painted this way.

    In the past bottom paints were a little more toxic than they are now and some folks wanted to avoid that. Others didn't want to pay the high cost of bottom paint or deal with the ablative qualities on a boat that didn't spent that much time in the water.

    Realizing that mine might spend a few weeks in the water, I started to wonder if I'd get critters growing on there. Then I started to worry that the paint wouldn't hold up. If you read the label, it has a scary warning about the number of hours the paint will last.

    I called the Pettit rep and while professional, he told me in no uncertain terms that what I was planning would be suicide for the boat. The nice folks at Kirby were less firm, but generally agreed that I should scrape it off and use bottom paint. That scared me a bit.

    Two other friends who've done similar trips in small boats (one with house paint, another with topside paint) both said it worked out ok, though there was a layer of slime growing on the bottom by the end. A third, a lifelong small boat guy said, don't worry about it. The rep probably just reads the can instructions back to you.

    I decided that since after past trips of a week or two, the hull showed no signs of stress, I'd probably (I say probably because I still am obsessing about it a tiny bit) be OK. I bought a soft bristle brush and figure every week or couple of days, I'll let the boat dry down, clean it a bit, and proceed.

    So why I am laying under the boat? To add touch up paint to every last teeny scratch to lower the chances of saltwater intruding. Trying to make one less thing to worry about...
    Tales from the land and sea: http://terrapintales.wordpress.com/

  10. #45
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
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    PNW, an island west of Seattle
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    2,030

    Default Re: Small Boat on the Inside Passage

    While it's not quite the same thing, the topsides on my small sailboat, just above the waterline, get continually splashed during the summer while she sits on the mooring. At the end of the season there has always been a bit of green slime/grass/whatever. I scrub it off with a white scotch-brite pad and everything is rosy. The plywood planks don't care one bit. The paint has never failed there. I would do exactly as you intend.... use your boat as is. Bottom painting is for continual immersion. My boat needs it for her mooring spell, but only below the water and only because the time of immersion is much longer than three weeks.

    Have a great trip.

    Jeff

  11. #46
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Victoria, BC, Canada
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    Default Re: Small Boat on the Inside Passage

    Bruce,

    Fire-Drake's bottom is painted with good quality acrylic latex house paint. The longest time she's spent in the water was 5 weeks in the very waters you are heading up to.

    Result? A little bit of skunge/slime that was easily removed by scrubbing with a brush once I got the boat on the trailer and back home. No evidence of water intrusion.

    The slime might have hampered rowing speed a tad but not enough that I noticed. If it became an issue, I could have dried her out on the beach over one tide cycle and had a scrub.
    Alex

    "“He was unfamiliar with the sea and did not like it much: it was a place that made you cold and wet and sick” " Nevil Shute, Trustee From the Toolroom

  12. #47
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
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    Salt Spring Island, BC
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    Default Re: Small Boat on the Inside Passage

    It scrubs off more easily when it's wet, like right out of the water. Haul, flip it, scrub gently with a Scotch Brite, which, by the way, stores in a lot less space than a brush and does double duty as a dish/pot scrubber.

  13. #48
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Location
    Seattle, WA
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    3,429

    Default Re: Small Boat on the Inside Passage

    Quote Originally Posted by Gib Etheridge View Post
    It scrubs off more easily when it's wet, like right out of the water. Haul, flip it, scrub gently with a Scotch Brite, which, by the way, stores in a lot less space than a brush and does double duty as a dish/pot scrubber.
    Before or after you use it on the slime Gib? Just asking...

  14. #49
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Gold Coast Australia
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    2,745

    Default Re: Small Boat on the Inside Passage

    Quote Originally Posted by Bruce Bateau View Post
    And now looking at the picture myself, it might be:



    My boat is painted with Pettit Easypoxy topsides paint on the top and the bottom. I understand a lot of small boats are painted this way

    So why I am laying under the boat? To add touch up paint to every last teeny scratch to lower the chances of saltwater intruding. Trying to make one less thing to worry about...
    I wouldn’t stress too much ,this is what my Tammie looked like when I found her,after having sat outside in the weather for several years. The Hoop marine ply was still intact just a little worse for wear .
    I use Wattyl Proffesional Choice oil based house paint on both boats.

    [IMG][/IMG]

  15. #50
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    Nov 2011
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    Default Re: Small Boat on the Inside Passage

    Quote Originally Posted by cstevens View Post
    Before or after you use it on the slime Gib? Just asking...
    Looks like I gave myself away Chris, but by now everyone here knows I don't have much class.

  16. #51
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Location
    Portland, Oregon
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    115

    Default Re: Small Boat on the Inside Passage

    It's beginning to look a little like Christmas around here.



    Can you guess what I got?
    Tales from the land and sea: http://terrapintales.wordpress.com/

  17. #52
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
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    Portland, Oregon
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    115

    Default Re: Small Boat on the Inside Passage

    Also wondering. For a stern tie or clothesline set up. What type of line are folks using? And how much? Assuming floating, yellow...
    Last edited by Bruce Bateau; 06-22-2019 at 09:27 PM.
    Tales from the land and sea: http://terrapintales.wordpress.com/

  18. #53
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Location
    Portland, Oregon
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    115

    Default Re: Small Boat on the Inside Passage

    Staying dry is really important for me. During the day, I wear hi-tech materials. If it rains really hard, I don good old rubber rain gear.

    At night is where it gets challenging. I love sewing and have made a series of increasingly useful cockpit tents.

    I call my latest The Caterpillar because it is long a little odd in shape. It covers the whole boat stem to stern.



    But no matter how I adjust the flaps on the outside, condensation always builds up on the inside. Then not only does it drip a bit, it finds a way to drip right on my head.

    I couldn't stand that happening for weeks on end, so something had to be done!



    Enter some Sunbrella remnants (about half the list price) from the local sail loft and my new-to-me sewing machine, the PFAFF. Less stylish than the old Bernina, but considerably more powerful.
    Tales from the land and sea: http://terrapintales.wordpress.com/

  19. #54
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Location
    Portland, Oregon
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    115

    Default Re: Small Boat on the Inside Passage

    The Caterpillar is suspended with tension between the masts and is sort of like a Conestoga wagon with three fiberglass rods encased in pockets- like a sail batten.



    I sewed the Sunbrella in a loose V, also tensioned between the masts, but slightly lower than the outer layer (waterproof double-ripstop nylon). Then I added some hooks/rings and shock cords to the hoops to provide outward tension.

    I didn't want to take any vital thing on the trip that I hadn't really tested out, so I had to go on a trip!

    It worked as planned, except that new Sunbrella doesn't soak up much water, so the drips sat in folds of the fabric or went down onto the side of the boat and into the bilge.

    To solve this, I sewed up a loose hem on the outside, bottom edge of the inner tent- sort of like a gutter. Now the drips get caught in there. Problem solved (I hope).
    Tales from the land and sea: http://terrapintales.wordpress.com/

  20. #55
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
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    Melb, Vic, Aus
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    637

    Default Re: Small Boat on the Inside Passage

    Its looking cosy there Bruce!!

  21. #56
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    Nov 2011
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    Salt Spring Island, BC
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    Default Re: Small Boat on the Inside Passage

    Got mosquito netting for the ends?

  22. #57
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    Sep 2016
    Location
    Portland, Oregon
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    115

    Default Re: Small Boat on the Inside Passage

    What? You guys have mosquitoes up there?

    I haven't experienced a lot of them on our half of the Salish Sea. How bad are they up north?

    (And please don't tell me that they only bite Americans!)
    Tales from the land and sea: http://terrapintales.wordpress.com/

  23. #58
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    Nov 2011
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    Salt Spring Island, BC
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    Default Re: Small Boat on the Inside Passage

    Some places there are't any, other places they and the black flies will swarm you. Best to be prepared.

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