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Thread: Why mizzen sails?

  1. #106
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
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    vancouver, british columbia
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    1,147

    Default Re: Why mizzen sails?



    For would-be Alaska builders who are decidedly not endurance athletes and approaching their best-before dates, following the principal of "sail when you can, row when you must" I offer this: 4 knots of boat speed in under 10 knots apparent wind with a reefed mizzen, self-steering. No sweat.
    Last edited by darroch; 06-18-2019 at 09:49 AM.

  2. #107
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
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    Melb, Vic, Aus
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    668

    Default Re: Why mizzen sails?

    What a lovely little video.

  3. #108
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    Jan 2009
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    northwestern Wisconsin
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    Default Re: Why mizzen sails?

    Quote Originally Posted by Geftb View Post
    What a lovely little video.
    Tell me about it. It's his fault that I built an Alaska in the first place--the designer had lots of photos of his boat on his website when it was still up and running.

    To
    You don't have to be prepared as long as you're willing to suffer the consequences.

    www.tompamperin.com

  4. #109
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
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    vancouver, british columbia
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    Default Re: Why mizzen sails?

    Quote Originally Posted by Geftb View Post
    What a lovely little video.
    Glad you liked it.
    I think going to windward is my favourite point of sail - and when the wind picks up a bit and she puts her shoulder down and turns up a point - man, what a thrill.

  5. #110
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Shoreline, Washington
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    2,345

    Default Re: Why mizzen sails?

    I think Kurylko's split Alaska rig is a little different than some of the other configurations. That Alaska seems more of a cat ketch than a cat yawl - that is, no jib, and a relatively larger mizzen set further forward. Alaska is also relatively narrow and perhaps a little more slack bilged than some other 'lug yawl' beach cruisers. Two sails closer to the same same size splits the rig more evenly and reduces the height of the CE for the main or foresail, whichever you call it. That would seem to make sense for a slippery hull more on the rowing end of the spectrum. Just a theory. In other lug yawls the mizzen is truly a riding sail and intentionally pushed well to the aft end of the boat, clear of the cockpit. A good sized mainsail is well forward with all its driving force. A little bit of mizzen has a strong pivoting force when set all the way aft. That is welcome when you are wrestling with a fair size main, a kiting yard, no lazyjacks . . . Also nice to have clear space to stand up in front of the mizzen and abaft the mainsail boom.

    Then you've got Alex, who went all lug yawl on his Alaska, before designing and building another lug yawl.
    Eric
    Last edited by Eric Hvalsoe; 06-19-2019 at 03:04 PM.

  6. #111
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
    Location
    Portland, OR, USA
    Posts
    3

    Default Re: Why mizzen sails?

    From Francois Vivier, about Jewell (http://www.vivierboats.com/en/product/jewell/):

    We also made the choice of a yawl rig, because it is beautiful and very convenient to use, it proved to be fast, and also because Americans are fond of yawls.
    I was happy to make something different than the gaff sloop I generally prefer on such a day-boat (Stir-Ven, Beniguet, Lilou…). The yawl rig is very versatile, allowing one to sail under main only, or under mizzen and jib. The mizzen also allows the boat to safely point into the wind, tending itself while the skipper starts the motor, puts in a reef, or entertains the kids. In Jewell, the main mast is shorter and lighter, so easier to step. In addition, we intend to make the masts hollow-birdsmouth construction and use Dyneema shrouds, both light and easier to handle. The jib has overlap in order to improve pointing ability. It is always a mania for me to design fast boats, especially to windward, as it is also the best for safety. The jib is small, so can be easily tacked even if single-handed. The mizzen is a simple standing lug (stores in the cabin) improved with a foot flexible batten. The long boomkin crosses the transom, under deck, and is easily pulled into the boat for trailering.
    The emphasis is mine. It's as good a reason as any.

  7. #112
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Dunedin, New Zealand
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    570

    Default Re: Why mizzen sails?

    I'm following this thread with interest. Building a Kotik gunter yawl.
    Ian
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  8. #113
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Somewhere in South Central PA
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    3,454

    Default Re: Why mizzen sails?

    I have one on my Drascombe Dabber and I had one on my Elver canoe yawl. I like what it is able to do. It helps in "heaving to" and I have sailed in strong breezes under just the jib and mizzen (but not to windward). It is useful for setting up a cockpit tarp for camping.

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