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Thread: Baking skills

  1. #1
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    Default Baking skills

    Fascinating to watch

    "Reason and facts are sacrificed to opinion and myth. Demonstrable falsehoods are circulated and recycled as fact. Narrow minded opinion refuses to be subjected to thought and analysis. Too many now subject events to a prefabricated set of interpretations, usually provided by a biased media source. The myth is more comfortable than the often difficult search for truth."







  2. #2
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    Default Re: Baking skills

    Of all the skills from ancient days, those involving yeast amaze me most - bread, cheese, yogurt, beer and wine. I can live on that so long as you don't put some pepperoni on the table...

  3. #3
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    Default Re: Baking skills

    Interesting coincidence that I just this morning mixed up the dough for some rye bread... proofing now, as we 'speak'.
    "Reason and facts are sacrificed to opinion and myth. Demonstrable falsehoods are circulated and recycled as fact. Narrow minded opinion refuses to be subjected to thought and analysis. Too many now subject events to a prefabricated set of interpretations, usually provided by a biased media source. The myth is more comfortable than the often difficult search for truth."







  4. #4
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    Default Re: Baking skills

    Quote Originally Posted by Norman Bernstein View Post
    Interesting coincidence that I just this morning mixed up the dough for some rye bread... proofing now, as we 'speak'.
    I like rye! Rachel sandwiches are great this time of year.

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    Default Re: Baking skills

    Don't ever think you can beat a baker at arm wrestling.

    Kevin
    There are two kinds of boaters: those who have run aground, and those who lie about it.

  6. #6
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    Default Re: Baking skills

    Quote Originally Posted by CWSmith View Post
    I like rye! Rachel sandwiches are great this time of year.
    I have been making light rye using the 'no knead' method... and baking in a preheated dutch oven. It is super easy!

    150 grams of rye flour
    600 grams of bread flour
    1.5 Tbsp of yeast
    1.5 Tbsp of kosher salt
    1 Tbsp caraway seeds
    2 cups of hot tap water

    Let rise for at least 4-5 hours.... then turn it out on a floured surface, 'knead' it slightly, and let it rise again, in a container just slightly smaller than the interior of your dutch oven (lined with parchment paper). Meanwhile, preheat the dutch oven in a 450 degree oven... in a half hour, lift the dough and drop it into the dutch oven, and bake (covered) for 30-35 minutes.
    "Reason and facts are sacrificed to opinion and myth. Demonstrable falsehoods are circulated and recycled as fact. Narrow minded opinion refuses to be subjected to thought and analysis. Too many now subject events to a prefabricated set of interpretations, usually provided by a biased media source. The myth is more comfortable than the often difficult search for truth."







  7. #7
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    Default Re: Baking skills

    I've finished breakfast and am not at all hungry, but I would go for one of those pastries.

    My own meager attempts at baking, pale by comparison.

    Jeff

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    Default Re: Baking skills

    One of my new favorites is this Cruffin from BLVL Bakery on Congress Street in Portland. Unbelievably good.



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    Default Re: Baking skills

    Quote Originally Posted by CWSmith View Post
    Of all the skills from ancient days, those involving yeast amaze me most - bread, cheese, yogurt, beer and wine. I can live on that so long as you don't put some pepperoni on the table...
    Scurvy is ugly. Grab some limes.
    Ask me! I've got my Leatherman!

  10. #10
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    Default Re: Baking skills

    I recently joined Dear Wifey in a no-grains diet for a while. My perverse coping mechanism was to get back into baking, which I haven't really done in many years.

    My current quest is to re-create a particular unique baguette that used to be done by a local bakery which closed years ago. I'm getting there.

    That part about 4:30 into the video where he's shaping a small bun with each hand simultaneously... yeah I could practice for a month and not be that good.
    The premise is WRONG, Bob!

  11. #11
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    Default Re: Baking skills

    Thanks tor the rye bread no knead method. I have been struggling to make rye bread. I will try yours.
    Jim McGee

  12. #12
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    Default Re: Baking skills

    Quote Originally Posted by Norman Bernstein View Post
    I have been making light rye using the 'no knead' method... and baking in a preheated dutch oven. It is super easy!

    150 grams of rye flour
    600 grams of bread flour
    1.5 Tbsp of yeast
    1.5 Tbsp of kosher salt
    1 Tbsp caraway seeds
    2 cups of hot tap water

    Let rise for at least 4-5 hours.... then turn it out on a floured surface, 'knead' it slightly, and let it rise again, in a container just slightly smaller than the interior of your dutch oven (lined with parchment paper). Meanwhile, preheat the dutch oven in a 450 degree oven... in a half hour, lift the dough and drop it into the dutch oven, and bake (covered) for 30-35 minutes.
    Thank you! I have not baked bread in some years, but you just inspired me to do it. It may take a few days to get some of the ingredients, but I'm going to give it a try. Thank you for the recipe.

    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Bow View Post
    Scurvy is ugly. Grab some limes.
    Point taken! I'll get some alcohol just to wash it down...

  13. #13
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    Default Re: Baking skills

    I bake an easy peasant bread recipe every few weeks, just for grins. A family member gave the recipe to me about five or six years ago, it goes well with hearty stews, on its own or in baked French toast. I shake it up occasionally by adding in a bit of wheat flour. I've also baked hamburger buns and cinnamon rolls from scratch, as well as beer bread, soda bread and soda scones. They all make the house smell pretty great in the process.

    This guy's skills are way beyond amazing. I sometimes fantasize about running away from the the advertising and marketing world I find myself everyday for something more honest and seemingly simple, like the job of a baker. The early morning hours would suck, though. Thanks for sharing.

    Trevor

  14. #14
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    Default Re: Baking skills

    For those new to baking, here is a variant of Norman's approach ("no knead") which one might characterise as not-very-much knead bread. I have spelt out all the steps in detail to help real beginners, so it will probably be a bit of a long post.

    SLOW RISE BREAD, USING A COVERED DUTCH OVEN.

    ATR tested version, 16 May 2018. A synthesis of ideas from several published sources, principally the book “Flour, Water, Salt, Yeast”, by Ken Forkish (should be in your local library).

    Weigh all ingredients in grams. Baker’s percentages below are different from “real” percentages – they are the ratio of a particular ingredient to the initial weight of flour, as given in grams, with the flour expressed as 100%. Vary the total quantity as you wish, keeping the baker’s percentages constant.

    All purpose white flour 500g (100%). Substitute Whole White up to 200g.

    Water 390g (78%). (With 200g whole white, increase water to 425g, 85%).

    Fine sea salt 11g (about 2%, can vary to taste). Yeast. A scant ╝ teaspoon.

    Step 1. Mix, rest, fold and invert. In a roomy food safe container, thoroughly mix dry ingredients (except yeast) with a big spoon. In a separate container, stir a teaspoon of sugar and the yeast into the water (warmed to about 90 degrees F). Let the yeast activate for about 15 minutes, then add the liquid to the flour mix and stir with your table spoon until everything is JUST fully incorporated (no dry flour evident). Cover and rest for about 30 minutes.

    Step 1a. Fold and Invert 3 or 4 times to develop gluten – an extended process with about 10 minutes or so between folds. See Forkish book for techniques. Wet your hand as needed to keep dough from sticking to your fingers. This produces a wetter dough than is usual in traditional baking.

    Step 2. Shape. Turn into any standard 8’’ or larger kitchen bowl, lined with parchment paper. After rising overnight, this will automatically result in a nicely shaped dough ball. Cover the bowl with a plate or plastic film.

    Step 3. Slow rise/ferment at a cool temperature, say around 60 degrees F or so. Time up to some 14 hours (overnight). We use very little yeast, and give the mixed and folded dough lots of time to ferment and develop flavour. After the long, cool rising, the dough should be at least double in size from its state in step one. In the morning, rest/proof the bowl in a warm room until this is achieved.

    Step 4. Preheat kitchen oven to 450 degrees F, after placing the empty covered Dutch oven on the middle rack. Let it heat up for 30 minutes. I use an aluminium “heat shield” over the lowest oven element to prevent burning of the bottom of the loaf. Note that this temperature is cooler than Forkish’s recommended 475 degrees.

    Step 5. Transfer risen dough ball to hot Dutch oven. Careful – use good oven gloves here! Holding the wings of the parchment paper, transfer the naturally shaped dough ball still in its parchment paper nest from the cool kitchen bowl to the hot Dutch oven. Replace its lid, and return to the kitchen oven. Set timer to the number chosen for covered baking in Step 6.

    Step 6. Bake 35 minutes covered. Remove lid, bake another 20 to 30 minutes or so, uncovered. Note. The covered to uncovered times and ratios of one to the other can vary. Experiment, and use your judgement. In bread making, baking times and temperatures generally are guides, not hard rules. It depends on the chosen flour, the weather and humidity, and individual preferences for taste and texture. It may be that you will find you like a darker crust, and so choose to bake uncovered a bit longer. What works best may also vary with any given oven (its temperature accuracy, heat distribution etc.) and your choice of ingredients.

    Step 7. Remove the Dutch oven from the kitchen oven, turn the baked loaf out onto a rack (removing the parchment paper as you do this).

    You’re done. Let it cool for an hour or two before eating! It’s a crusty, chewy bread, which toasts well. Use of whole white results in a modified taste which I like, and perhaps a less hard crust. I use Spearville whole white, substituting 100 grams = 20 % of total flour, with 405 grams of water. Note that the parchment paper makes for easy handling, seems safe up to the tested 450 F, and does not stick to wet dough.


    Happy baking - Tony.

  15. #15
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    Default Re: Baking skills

    Recent rustic rye. Got a baking stone for Christmas that I love.



    Also got a Mercer bread knife that's dangerously sharp, but really does the trick—

    We're merely mammals. Let's misbehave! ŚCole Porter

  16. #16
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    Default Re: Baking skills

    Quote Originally Posted by Chip-skiff View Post
    Recent rustic rye. Got a baking stone for Christmas that I love.



    Also got a Mercer bread knife that's dangerously sharp, but really does the trick—


    Oooh, these look delicious.

    Choose wisely -Treat kindly...

    A secret to a good marriage is to have a quick mind and a slow mouth...



    S/V ORCA 38' Herreshoff Ketch

  17. #17
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    Default Re: Baking skills

    That video also left me somewhat awestruck at the gloriously compact/efficient beauty of that kitchen... and then I noticed... it's mobile. He's in a trailer or a food-truck of some kind.

    Mind, blown.
    The premise is WRONG, Bob!

  18. #18
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    Default Re: Baking skills

    Quote Originally Posted by Tonyr View Post
    For those new to baking, here is a variant of Norman's approach ("no knead") which one might characterise as not-very-much knead bread. I have spelt out all the steps in detail to help real beginners, so it will probably be a bit of a long post.
    This is certainly similar to my recipe. The dutch oven seems to resolve the issue of getting enough intense heat for the baking process, without having to deal with a baking stone. What it doesn't have, is a humidification capability, which is nominally meant to create a crispy crust.

    The crust on my rye bread isn't as 'crispy' as I would like... it's crisp when just taken from the oven, but it ends up being a bit softer than optimum. I'd like it to be so crispy that it crumbles when cut, after cooling, which it does not (but regardless, it's still delicious). So perhaps it's the lack of humidity.... and I might try NOT covering the dutch oven next time, and introducing a water tray in the oven, to see if I can get the loaf crispier... maybe the cover of the dutch oven isn't really necessary.
    "Reason and facts are sacrificed to opinion and myth. Demonstrable falsehoods are circulated and recycled as fact. Narrow minded opinion refuses to be subjected to thought and analysis. Too many now subject events to a prefabricated set of interpretations, usually provided by a biased media source. The myth is more comfortable than the often difficult search for truth."







  19. #19
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    Default Re: Baking skills

    Norm, just take the lid off the dutch halfway through the baking time.
    The premise is WRONG, Bob!

  20. #20
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    Default Re: Baking skills

    The irony of you posting this, Norman, knowing you live with a celiac...

    Great video! I'm still trying to perfect my pizza dough. My daughter and I did a little experimenting with a couple of batches last night. Fun stuff.

  21. #21
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    Default Re: Baking skills

    Quote Originally Posted by pkrone View Post
    The irony of you posting this, Norman, knowing you live with a celiac...
    Actually, I have gotten accoustomed to cooking, as well as eating, gluten free....

    ...but regardless, you just can't beat a home-made, just-baked rye bread!
    "Reason and facts are sacrificed to opinion and myth. Demonstrable falsehoods are circulated and recycled as fact. Narrow minded opinion refuses to be subjected to thought and analysis. Too many now subject events to a prefabricated set of interpretations, usually provided by a biased media source. The myth is more comfortable than the often difficult search for truth."







  22. #22
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    Default Re: Baking skills

    Quote Originally Posted by Spin_Drift View Post
    Oooh, these look delicious.
    My first batch of rye with the baking stone– turned out well. Made sandwiches with home-cured pastrami and home-grown potato salad.



    Kneading bread is something I enjoy. But I have plenty of time on my hands.
    We're merely mammals. Let's misbehave! ŚCole Porter

  23. #23
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    Default Re: Baking skills

    I make bread but seeing this makes me feel so inadequate. A local favorite restaurant opened up a seemingly great bakery a couple years ago ant I was salivating, waiting for the opening. Sad to say the fare is not very good. What a let down.
    Tom L

  24. #24
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    Default Re: Baking skills

    Humidification (steam generation, like a commercial oven in miniature) is achieved by the closed lid of the Dutch oven retaining the moisture in the wet dough being driven off by the initial baking process. The Boule is essentially baked by the 35 minute closed lid period, and finished off (crisped up) by the subsequent open 20 to 30 minute process.

    Tony.

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