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Thread: 1942 lyman runabout 14' bottom paint

  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2019
    Location
    barre, ma usa
    Posts
    2

    Cool 1942 lyman runabout 14' bottom paint

    hello
    I have just purchased a 1942 Lyman runabout with a cool little Tee Nee trailer complete with springs and
    shocks. The boat was restored five or six years ago to include a new transom. I don't believe the previous
    owner maintained the boat since its restoration {shame}. Fortunately after close inspection it just needs new
    paint and varnish.
    Like the previous owner I am inland and the boat will be transported to and from local lakes and ponds not
    to sit at a dock for the season. It most likely won't see salt water for the next ten years.
    Can anyone tell me what type of paint I should use on the hull {bottom} for its intended use? Also, the best
    brand.
    It is a lapstrake douglas fir plywood, I believe
    Any help would be greatly appreciated

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Mountain lakes of Vermont
    Posts
    12,173

    Default Re: 1942 lyman runabout 14' bottom paint

    Welcome to the Forum!
    You certainly don't need bottom paint. On my three fresh water, trailer-bound boats, I use oil based paints. Any of the marine brands will do fine.
    I should add this: Do you know what kind of paint is on the boat now? Oil or water-based? Could be a problem putting one over the other.
    I was born on a wooden boat that I built myself.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Hills of Vermont, USA
    Posts
    28,602

    Default Re: 1942 lyman runabout 14' bottom paint

    Welcome!

    I'm with Rich - if just trailering, most any quality enamel paint will work. Remember to thoroughly clean between lakes to keep down organism transfer (weeds, mussels, etc.)

    Those trailers are really cool - and they ride better than most modern ones.

    Now - the most important part: we need pictures! Even one would be good.
    "If it ain't broke, you're not trying." - Red Green

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    South Puget Sound/summer Eastern carib./winter
    Posts
    15,895

    Default Re: 1942 lyman runabout 14' bottom paint

    Being ply, I might lean to an epoxy bottom with an LP over .
    Its not nessesary, but it’s the best.
    Beware of one part polys, (Brightsides),they do not like any time underwater.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Mountain lakes of Vermont
    Posts
    12,173

    Default Re: 1942 lyman runabout 14' bottom paint

    I was going to question whether the planking was really ply since 1942 seemed early for plywood. But, a Google search says that plywood first became available in the U.S. in 1928. Come to think of it, I think the PT boats of WWII were mostly plywood construction.
    I was born on a wooden boat that I built myself.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Hills of Vermont, USA
    Posts
    28,602

    Default Re: 1942 lyman runabout 14' bottom paint

    My 1941 (launching - was probably started in 39 or 40) boat has plywood bulkheads.
    "If it ain't broke, you're not trying." - Red Green

  7. #7

    Default Re: 1942 lyman runabout 14' bottom paint

    Any good quality marine paint is fine. I like paints from George Kirby Jr. Paint Company of New Bedford, Mass. No need for anti-fouling bottom paint.

    Andreas

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2016
    Location
    Queens, NY
    Posts
    198

    Default Re: 1942 lyman runabout 14' bottom paint

    Quote Originally Posted by Rich Jones View Post
    Come to think of it, I think the PT boats of WWII were mostly plywood construction.
    those were double or triple planked mahogany, i think.
    but they got referred to as plywood colloquially sometimes

  9. #9
    Join Date
    May 2019
    Location
    barre, ma usa
    Posts
    2

    Default Re: 1942 lyman runabout 14' bottom paint

    Thanks guys! You're the best! I'm really excited to get this one in the water. I have a 14' 1958 Chris Craft kit boat that I bought years ago
    that had a hole in the hull. After stripping one side I realized I may have bit off a little more than I could chew. Still have it....maybe some
    day. I've been looking at George Kirby paints.
    Once again, thank you for the advice. Pics coming soon!

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