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Thread: Light Chebacco

  1. #141
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    Default Re: Light Chebacco

    I can't figure out why that picture above is rotated. Oh well - you get the idea. Anyway it seemed safer to make the cabin sides before the deck. I was particularly confused about the front of the cabin and how the sides come together around the mast. Photo Aug 07, 8 01 57 PM.jpg

  2. #142
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    Default Re: Light Chebacco

    It wasn’t so tough in hindsight, but it took a lot of fiddling, taking it off the boat, cutting a bit more, fitting again, etc… You can see the clamps when I finally glued on the starboard side. This is the construction paper I used to attempt a pattern for that piece (also the mallet I used for fine adjustments…).
    Photo Aug 07, 8 02 08 PM.jpg

  3. #143
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    Default Re: Light Chebacco

    I even cut the windows. That was a trick! They still need some repair and smoothing after my jigsaw job, but I’ll leave that until later.
    Photo Aug 11, 5 27 51 PM.jpg

  4. #144
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    Default Re: Light Chebacco

    I got some great advice from Jamie about mast slot design and it helped me think about how the mast pieces must go together. I read some classic posts from chebacco.com discussing weather helm. P. Bolger reportedly experienced a sail on a Chebacco and found more weather helm than he would have liked. He said moving the mast forward 3 or 4 inches wouldn’t hurt. I agonized about this for a few days, tried some different pencil marks and clamping arrangements, and settled on 2.5 inches forward of the mark on the plans.
    Photo Aug 18, 4 34 29 PM.jpg
    Photo Aug 18, 4 34 12 PM.jpg

  5. #145
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    Default Re: Light Chebacco

    I made the roof from 2 layers of quarter-inch. It wasn’t bad but it meant a small strip of butt-block on the underside of the aft end. I’ll probably have to reinforce that area anyway for halyard cleats in that spot.
    You can see here I also made the seats (which are not yet glued down) and also the “backrest.” In the plans, this extends upward into a vertical coaming. I’m going to attempt an angled-back coaming and attach it to the piece shown here.
    Photo Aug 20, 7 42 40 AM.jpg
    Attached Images Attached Images

  6. #146
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    Default Re: Light Chebacco

    I cut the hole for the companionway!
    Photo Aug 22, 9 26 22 AM.jpg

  7. #147
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    Default Re: Light Chebacco

    Someone gave me an old 3-pulley bandsaw that I finally figured out how to repair. I used it to rough out the Jonesport cleat.
    Photo Sep 26, 2 26 39 PM.jpgPhoto Sep 26, 2 26 17 PM (1).jpg
    I thought about putting in a bronze pin, but I think wood will work fine and look nice too. I glued it in. Think it will work? You can also see I finished piecing the deck together. They are butt-blocked underneath. I’m going to glass the seams on top.
    Photo Oct 16, 2 48 39 PM.jpg

  8. #148
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    Default Re: Light Chebacco

    I wanted to make a low-ish hatch because i liked the look of this one on chebacco.com.
    low hatch.jpg
    I had trouble figuring out the order of construction and assembly. Eventually I decided to make the rails that slide and attach the front and rear faces. Here is the aft end glued in place.
    Photo Oct 16, 2 42 22 PM.jpg

    On top is just scrapwood used to keep the rails parallel and the right separation (hopefully). Here is the fore piece.
    Photo Oct 16, 2 42 53 PM.jpg
    The trouble is, with such low hatch rails, the roof gets in the way of potential cross-pieces that would hold the hatch on when the hatch is all the way forward. I’m going to try to mount a small arch-shaped beam just aft of this one pictured, with little aluminum “tongue” pieces epoxied on the bottom. (Luckily, I had some 1/16 aluminium stock which was thin enough to cut with my bandsaw.)
    Photo Oct 16, 2 42 13 PM.jpg

  9. #149
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    Default Re: Light Chebacco

    I think the wooden pin will be fine as long as it is hard wood.

  10. #150
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    Default Re: Light Chebacco

    Quote Originally Posted by csmead View Post
    Someone gave me an old 3-pulley bandsaw that I finally figured out how to repair. I used it to rough out the Jonesport cleat.
    Photo Sep 26, 2 26 17 PM (1).jpg

    I put a groove in the top front end of the cleat so the anchor line could lead straight forward. In case it wanted to jump out I bolted a boom bail intended for a sailing dinghy over the groove to keep the line leading forward. Don't know if it made a big difference but between that and leaving the mizzen up at anchor she stayed head to wind at anchor, never sailed around.

    Jamie

    PS Nice looking cleat.

  11. #151
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    Default Re: Light Chebacco

    Quote Originally Posted by Jamie Orr View Post
    I put a groove in the top front end of the cleat so the anchor line could lead straight forward. In case it wanted to jump out I bolted a boom bail intended for a sailing dinghy over the groove to keep the line leading forward. Don't know if it made a big difference but between that and leaving the mizzen up at anchor she stayed head to wind at anchor, never sailed around.

    PS Nice looking cleat.
    Thanks! I remember seeing that boom bail on a photo and wondering about it. Hmmm... Okay I'll keep that in mind.

    Quote Originally Posted by johngsandusky View Post
    I think the wooden pin will be fine as long as it is hard wood.
    Okay cool, thanks!

  12. #152
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    Default Re: Light Chebacco

    I was thinking about how to finish the portlights. It's funny - I have to ask myself the question about "degree of fanciness" pretty often. While daydreaming, I often come back to the slab-sided June Bug by Bill Garden.
    Garden-18-Cat-Schooner-Nov-1945-Page-31-e1552328732357.jpg
    I mean, Chebacco is different in a lot of ways, but I feel like there are a lot of similarities in character - particularly regarding my sheet-ply version. flat-panel sides / low cuddy-cabin / no frills / ease of construction / sprung for adventure; basically a boy scout cabin that sails. So I guess that's the target.

    Back to the portlights - I want them to be simple. Bill Sampson reported (over 20 years ago on chebacco.com), "I did SYLVESTER’s portlights simply by cutting oval holes in the sides of the cabin and screwing1/8″ acrylic sheet on the inside, with some clear silicone sealant between." Jamie Orr's are brass and look awesome. Here they are from an old post, same website.
    cabin-windows.jpg
    I was thinking of 1/4" painted plywood trim on the outside, with Bill Sampson's acrylic inside. Any thoughts? Do I really use silicone to seal? I seem to remember from other posts that I should avoid silicone because it's hard to remove when replacing.
    Photo Oct 25, 4 50 41 PM.jpg

  13. #153
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    Default Re: Light Chebacco

    A second question: I was thinking about what John Welsford posted recently about his (brilliant) Long Steps build. Hope you guys don't mind if I re-post it here.
    Photo Oct 23, 6 15 32 PM.jpg
    He made a rub-rail / toe-rail combination by leaving the trim just proud of the deck. I kinda like it, and even more as I look at it longer. Do you think this would work on Chebacco? The plans call for a 1/5 " rub rail and also a 3/4" toe rail. Decks have no athwartships camber.
    Last edited by csmead; 10-26-2020 at 05:06 PM. Reason: I forgot stuff.

  14. #154
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    Default Re: Light Chebacco

    Silicone isn't so bad for removal,at least not when you compare it to the adhesive forms of Sikaflex.I believe 3M 5200 is about the same but never having worked with it can offer no substantive opinion.There is a silicone remover that kitchen and bathroom installers use and which may be of service.

  15. #155
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    Default Re: Light Chebacco

    Regarding the rudder: I took some 2x4 slivers to make two “core” pieces, seen here at the top and bottom of the forward opening. The top piece is plywood just for a covering. I couldn’t tell if the plans meant for this to be left open, but I guessed not. Could become a breeding ground for sea monsters, I think. I left holes so the whole thing can drain when the boat is on the trailer.


    The bottom plate is also screwed to the lower “core” piece from underneath.

    I know the grain of the veneer goes the wrong way. Hopefully it won’t make a difference once it’s painted. I didn’t have enough scraps to cut it the long way.


  16. #156
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    Default Re: Light Chebacco

    Generally, when the weather is nice here in Virginia Beach, I can work outside. However, even on foul days I can take care of many projects using the big cockpit as a workshop. It’s not ideal, being only 6 or so feet long and about as wide, but I can lightly clamp things to the cross-platforms (which are floorboards normally). I need to work carefully. Any scratches or accidental cuts affect my final product dramatically! In this picture, I’m roughing out the pieces of the mizzen mast step.



    You can see in the picture above two 6” galvanized lag bolts resting on the side deck. I plan to use these to secure the rudder. Andrew, what do you think? I’m not a welder and I wasn’t sure how to attach the rudder and tiller to the 2” aluminum post. This was Bill Samson’s answer from Chebacco news #14 (1997):

    I strayed a little from the plans, in this case, because I happened to have some 1” dia steel rod for the rudder post, rather than the 2” dia pipe specified on the plan. I welded two, three inch long ‘prongs’ onto the post, which locate in holes in the frame at the for’ard end of the rudder. The whole lot was then sheathed in glass and epoxy and is very strong. The tiller is made with steel ‘cheeks’ in way of the post. A tightly fitting stainless bolt goes through both cheeks and the post. This would certainly be easier to get right with a 2” post. Play in this joint can be most irritating when you are sailing, as I found to my cost. I fixed the problem by drilling out the holes and using a larger size bolt.

    Here is the dry fit, having bored longitudinal holes into the rudder “core” pieces. I plan to epoxy bond this as well, closing the gaps between the rod (pipe) and the cheek pieces. The plans seem to call for some metal strapping between the rod and the cheeks as well.






  17. #157
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    Default Re: Light Chebacco

    I made and installed the mizzen mast step based on the plans. I learned that cutting circular holes with a jigsaw is not easy when the holes are small.

    Also, I’ve been thinking about how to hold the rudder vertically in place. Some chebacco.com articles refer to making bushings out of nylon or something? I wondered about making something out of, oh I don’t know... plywood? I happen to have some lying around… Well, if I thought making round holes with a jigsaw was fiddly, imagine making donuts? I made two 1” thick donuts, each made from 2 layers of plywood glued together. I was thinking of drilling screws radially inward to hold the donut to the post. Maybe 6 or 8 screws per donut? I imagine placing them just above the mast step (to hold the post up) and just below the mast partner (to hold the post down). Also, I guess I need to figure out how to give the donuts a level surface to rest against, since the mast step and partner are not quite perpendicular to the rudder pipe. A skinny wedge with a hole cut out?

    At the top of the rod, I needed to attach a tiller. I had some ⅛” thick aluminum that I could cut with my little bandsaw and made this. It’s attached with a galvanized bolt. It seems a little wimpy, but the aluminum post looks to be only about ⅛” thick as well, so I couldn’t justify beefing up the tiller bracket. Hopefully it can all handle the action planned for it.
    The rudder is held on by galvanized bolts fore/aft, and also some aluminum straps I made which are attached with stainless screws from the sides. I don’t know much about electrochemistry, but I think the aluminum becomes the anode and starts to corrode first in salty water. I’m hoping to get away with it because of this boat living on a trailer for the vast majority of its life.


  18. #158
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    Default Re: Light Chebacco

    I recently re-read Penelope Down East and got re-inspired for engineless sailing. I couldn’t think of how to stow the long oars required for a boat with a 7 ˝ ‘ beam, but I saw Harry Bryan’s plans in a 2012 Woodenboat article and made some take-apart oars out of 2” thick ash. The article described how to steam-bend the blade to make a sculling oar, but I left them straight and just painted them. I should really get a better picture, but for now, there they are under the freshly-varnished spars. The red stripes on the handle pieces are bent, painted steel bands. There are matching ones on the long pieces (just out of frame here) that allow each oar to be butted together and held with a carriage bolt. With ash oars, I guess I’m supposed to leave them unfinished. I plan to stow them under the coaming like Mr. Bryan, or possibly under the cockpit seats.

    Here’s the other ends.

  19. #159
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    Default Re: Light Chebacco

    I finally got her out of the garage on the trailer. You can see I painted the cockpit white. This is the first full view of the transom since I flipped the hull. How long ago was that? Good grief. Anyway, it'll get some wood trim on top of that plywood edge. I have some cypress leftover that might look nice. The gaff and the boom for my mainsail are cypress and I was surprised how nice they look with some varnish.

    Also, there’s that crazy rudder. It doesn’t seem big enough for the boat, but all the stories on chebacco.com testify to its sufficiency.




  20. #160
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    Default Re: Light Chebacco

    I decided to attach the rubbing strip and toe rail in the more traditional position, not raised like the Long Steps pictured in a previous post. I don’t know why - just liked it better. The ash trim will get varnished. I think the white color of the cockpit will carry over to the deck, coaming, and cabin, but still haven’t really decided what color to paint the hull.



  21. #161
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    Default Re: Light Chebacco

    Good progress!
    When I rowed my 20' Pennant or my 26' Friendship, I used a single oar. Those boats had keels to keep them straight, but I still offset the rudder slightly to balance the single oar. Once moving steadily, it didn't require much. The Pennant's beam was 6'10", I could row it faster with two oars, but one was sufficient. I sailed those boats everywhere, including on and off moorings and docks. Rowing was only in a dead calm. A steady stroke got me about half a knot in the yawl, which weighed about 7000#.

  22. #162
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    Default Re: Light Chebacco

    I think this is what the Jonesport cleat should look like. I installed this galvanized carriage bolt to keep the anchor line from jumping out of the channel.

  23. #163
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    Default Re: Light Chebacco

    Quote Originally Posted by johngsandusky View Post
    Good progress!
    When I rowed my 20' Pennant or my 26' Friendship, I used a single oar. Those boats had keels to keep them straight, but I still offset the rudder slightly to balance the single oar. Once moving steadily, it didn't require much. The Pennant's beam was 6'10", I could row it faster with two oars, but one was sufficient. I sailed those boats everywhere, including on and off moorings and docks. Rowing was only in a dead calm. A steady stroke got me about half a knot in the yawl, which weighed about 7000#.
    Thanks! It amazes me that you can do that with a 7000# boat. There was a recent discussion of Chebacco's weight on this forum. I'm guessing mine to be 1200# empty? Jamie Orr reports rowing 1 or 2 knots in his Chebacco.

  24. #164
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    Default Re: Light Chebacco

    I have to spend some time sanding and finishing some other details before finally painting. I also have to figure out where the cleats and other rigging bits should go. Then I really need to get to work on the sails. I’ve been procrastinating the sailmaking because it’s daunting to me. I was hoping to launch before the weather gets too cold, but a Spring launch seems more likely at this point. That would mark three years for the build when I estimated one! It certainly has been rewarding, though. Guess I'll keep going.



  25. #165
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    Default Re: Light Chebacco

    It's coming along really nicely. I suspect that you're correct in not worrying too much about mixed metals on a trailered boat.

    On the rowing thing--when I built my Autumn Leaves I was determined not to use a motor. The boat is 18'6 and displaces about one ton under way. I can row it at 1.5 knots easily, 2 knots with some effort. But what I cannot do is control it at 15 knots plus. And even in a 10-knot breeze, I can't push it directly to windward. There's just too much windage. So I reluctantly added an 80-pound thrust trolling motor, but it's only a necessity when getting in and out of tight quarters on windy days. (But sure, since it's there, I do use it othertimes.)
    -Dave

  26. #166
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    Default Re: Light Chebacco

    Quote Originally Posted by Woxbox View Post
    On the rowing thing--when I built my Autumn Leaves I was determined not to use a motor. The boat is 18'6 and displaces about one ton under way. I can row it at 1.5 knots easily, 2 knots with some effort. But what I cannot do is control it at 15 knots plus. And even in a 10-knot breeze, I can't push it directly to windward. There's just too much windage. So I reluctantly added an 80-pound thrust trolling motor, but it's only a necessity when getting in and out of tight quarters on windy days. (But sure, since it's there, I do use it othertimes.)
    Dave - thanks for sharing your experience. I might be in a similar situation. I'll have to see how things work in practice.

  27. #167
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    Default Re: Light Chebacco

    I was looking through my pictures from the past year to see if I should post any others and came across this gem. Am I the only one who had a preposterous daydream about a topsail on a way too small boat? No I would not do it! Yes I thought about it.



  28. #168
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    Default Re: Light Chebacco



    Boat is looking good!

    Trying to understand this detail. So, will the anchor itself be clipped on and off the end of the rode when needed?

    Kevin
    There are two kinds of boaters: those who have run aground, and those who lie about it.

  29. #169
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    Default Re: Light Chebacco

    I sail what essentially is a 14-foot version of Bolger's Bobcat. This is more or less a Chebacco with six feet cut off the stern. For twelve years I sailed without an auxiliary but could scull at one knot for extended periods because my rudder was oversized. That was perfect for getting in and out of harbors when the wind was light or sailing was prohibited. I continued to avoid the hassles and noise of an outboard until one afternoon I found myself becalmed in the middle of the Straits of Juan de Fuca. Suddenly that one-knot sculling speed no longer seemed so cool. Eventually that evening I made it to the shelter of Smith Island, where I anchored and spent the night decided what type of auxiliary I was going to buy.

    Electrics are great and the recent improvements to batteries are amazing. However, for me an auxiliary becomes important when I still need to travel several miles after the wind has stopped. A smelly gas-powered outboard still seems to be the best solution to that problem. Of course, some might question my choice of a British Seagull, built the year before I was born; however, the reasons for that decision are another topic.
    Last edited by Mike.Higgins.94301; 10-22-2021 at 01:21 PM.

  30. #170
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    Default Re: Light Chebacco

    Quote Originally Posted by csmead View Post
    I was looking through my pictures from the past year to see if I should post any others and came across this gem. Am I the only one who had a preposterous daydream about a topsail on a way too small boat? No I would not do it! Yes I thought about it.
    I re-rigged my Drascombe Lugger (19 foot dayboat) from a gunter main to a gaff main with topsail.

    Sorry about the slightly blurry picture, It's all I have to hand at the moment - also the boat is not sinking, it's actually in the trough of a wave...!

    211 (2).jpg

    The area of the new gaff main is similar to the old gunter main, the topsail is added sail area which helps to push the boat along in lighter airs and removing it effectively becomes my first reef.

    Rig 2 - Copy.jpg

    I did toy with setting the topsail up with outhauls, downhauls etc, but its just a 19 foot boat. Instead I shackle the topsail's clew and tack to the mainsail gaff, hoist the main with the topsail hanging down, then when the main is set I hoist the topsail yard to the masthead on its own halyard. It's easy enough to drop the main and unshackle the topsail then re-hoist the main if I want to shorten sail. When not in use the topsail just rolls up around its yard and is stowed on deck.

    gaff - Copy.jpg

    Personally I think topsails are incredibly cool. Go for it...!

  31. #171
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    Default Re: Light Chebacco

    Quote Originally Posted by Breakaway View Post
    Boat is looking good!

    Trying to understand this detail. So, will the anchor itself be clipped on and off the end of the rode when needed?

    Kevin
    Thanks Kevin! From what I've been told, the Jonesport cleat works just like a regular anchor cleat. The pin is just to hold the rode in the fore-aft channel. I'm not sure if I have to even use the channel. Why couldn't I just let it lie beside?

  32. #172
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    Default Re: Light Chebacco

    Quote Originally Posted by AndanteEd View Post
    I re-rigged my Drascombe Lugger (19 foot dayboat) from a gunter main to a gaff main with topsail.
    ... Personally I think topsails are incredibly cool. Go for it...!
    Dude, that looks amazing! Maybe if I re-design the whole rig with stays and a less-peaked mainsail it would make sense. I'm more likely to add a spinnaker to my boat's rig. You definitely inspired me, though!

  33. #173
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    Default Re: Light Chebacco

    Quote Originally Posted by Mike.Higgins.94301 View Post
    Electrics are great and the recent improvements to batteries are amazing. However, for me an auxiliary becomes important when I still need to travel several miles after the wind has stopped. A smelly gas-powered outboard still seems to be the best solution to that problem. Of course, some might question my choice of a British Seagull, built the year before I was born; however, the reasons for that decision are another topic.
    Mike, I definitely get it. And, I personally think the Seagull was the right choice!

  34. #174
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    Default Re: Light Chebacco

    By the way, your boat is looking great.

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