Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 35 of 48

Thread: Vintage Pirate Restoration - Mast design

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Location
    Saint James, NY
    Posts
    22

    Default Vintage Pirate Restoration - Mast design

    This is my first post to the wooden boat forum although I’ve been utilizing it very often for design inspiration, good boat building advice and guidance in my current project. I’m presently in the process of restoring a vintage wooden Pirate sailing dingy and have reached a point where I need some specific guidance on how best to proceed with the the mast fabrication, My mast blank is a solid, two piece laminated sitka spruce fabrication which will become (hopefully) a finished mast, 576cm (about 19’) in length above deck, and having an oval racetrack shaped design. The above-deck profile is shown below at its approximate midpoint.
    Mast Profile.jpg

    I have three initial design questions concerning this fabrication (and probably many more depending on how this discussion unfolds:


    1. I laid out the athwartship (67mm) dimension on my flat-sided blank and feel confident in being able to round it out (8-side to 16-side, etc) but what is a good method for layout of the fore/aft (80mm) dimension? I have an idea but any knowledgeable community input here would be much appreciated.
    2. I feel ‘fairly’ confident in cutting in the bolt groove (initial straight dado bit to depth followed by a 5/8” ball end router bit) but in doing so the bolt groove slot/opening ends up a bit wider than the spec’ed 4mm slot opening (by a little over 3mm) due to the router bit shank design. I don’t ‘think’ this small increase will impact the captive efficiency of the associated luff bolt-rope but I’d like some reassurance to that effect.
    3. Having received several negative opinions on the merits of using a bolt rope for wooden spar attachment I am considering using alternate methods but the options are many; bolt slugs, slides, internal track, external track, etc. I want to keep it simple and relatively foolproof but at the same time use a design that looks good and is in keeping with the vintage nature of the boat (and don’t forget cost). What design is eventually chosen may also negate the work required for #2 above. With that in mind I would welcome any suggestions based on the vast community experience that is out there.

    If you are interested in viewing photos of this ongoing vintage Pirate restoration please visit www.lisec.org and navigate to ‘Boat Shop’ then ‘Builds and Restorations’. You’ll see the 1954 Pirate Restoration under ‘Current Projects’. My thanks to everyone in advance and I look forward to any replies. JohnJ

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    UK. Cornwall, Suffolk.
    Posts
    5,428

    Default Re: Vintage Pirate Restoration - Mast design

    The 80mm dimension can be laid out from your first flat face, once straight and true.

    Re. Bolt slot, many ways to skin a cat, but I would perhaps use screwed on slats of wood for easier repair if needed. This will allow for accurate slot sizing.

    Or tracks with slides... Just make sure whatever you do does not trap water underneath...

    Welcome to the forum.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Rockland Maine USA and Woodbridge, Suffolk, England
    Posts
    379

    Default Re: Vintage Pirate Restoration - Mast design

    I've always cut the bolt rope groove in the two halves before gluing up, which is a much simpler operation. In this way you get the correct width for the slot which is very important – the one major thing that makes a bolt rope groove system fail is if the slot gets to be too wide so the luff starts to jam or even pull out of the groove. Other than that bolt rope grooves work pretty well in my experience.

    The only downside of this is that you do have to be careful when gluing the spar up to clean excess glue out of the groove straight away, though that is not so difficult to do.

    If you've already glued the blank up, then I would go for an alternative system.

    Cheers -- George
    Last edited by debenriver; 05-13-2019 at 05:21 AM.
    To be truly free to live, one must be free to think and speak.

    A C Grayling

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Sound Beach, NY
    Posts
    3,835

    Default Re: Vintage Pirate Restoration - Mast design

    All of my spar builds have used lacing or external track, so I can't help. Welcome aboard, see you on the water.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Location
    Saint James, NY
    Posts
    22

    Default Re: Vintage Pirate Restoration - Mast design

    Quote Originally Posted by lupussonic View Post
    The 80mm dimension can be laid out from your first flat face, once straight and true.

    Re. Bolt slot, many ways to skin a cat, but I would perhaps use screwed on slats of wood for easier repair if needed. This will allow for accurate slot sizing.

    Or tracks with slides... Just make sure whatever you do does not trap water underneath...

    Welcome to the forum.
    Thanks. That was my thinking once the width was tapered and planed flat to its correct dimension. Then scribe the width radius (33.5mm) onto the 80mm flat face at points along the spar, strike a batten and viola', the elongated flat side should then take care of itself. Rounding over should be straight-forward from there. I thought maybe there was some fancy modified spar gauge that I didn't know about that would work.
    The screwed on wood slats (perhaps metal to minimize wear) is a good idea and one I'll have to think closely about. I could then be able to more closely control the slot depth and width in one shot. Whatever is done will be well sealed to avoid trapping water. Thanks for the quick reply and suggestions.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Location
    Saint James, NY
    Posts
    22

    Default Re: Vintage Pirate Restoration - Mast design

    Thanks. Hope to be out there soon.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Location
    Saint James, NY
    Posts
    22

    Default Re: Vintage Pirate Restoration - Mast design

    Quote Originally Posted by debenriver View Post
    I've always cut the bolt rope groove in the two halves before gluing up, which is a much simpler operation. In this way you get the correct width for the slot which is very important – the one major thing that makes a bolt rope groove system fail is if the slot gets to be too wide so the luff starts to jam or even pull out of the groove. Other than that bolt rope grooves work pretty well in my experience.

    The only downside of this is that you do have to be careful when gluing the spar up to clean excess glue out of the groove straight away, though that is not so difficult to do.

    If you've already glued the blank up, then I would go for an alternative system.

    Cheers -- George
    Thank you for your reply. Unfortunately, it's already glued up. Not having built a mast before I failed to forsee the issue. I intuitively was thinking that the bolt slot could be more critical then first met my eye and you confirmed that. Thanks for the heads up on that. As for alternative systems; I was thinking in lieu of a bolt groove I would dado out for an internal track (thought it would look cleaner) or proceed with the bolt groove and may use a track system such as the internal round track system from Tides Marine. Any thoughts on either approach?

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Location
    St. Helens, Oregon
    Posts
    1,736

    Default Re: Vintage Pirate Restoration - Mast design

    Sounds like a fun project If you're planning on being able to reef, I'd be inclined to go with the trach thought. Bolt ropes make for very inefficient reefability unless you cut the sail so you have slugs below the reef points. Looking forward to pics of the project,,,you're teasing us John!

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Port Townsend WA
    Posts
    12,588

    Default Re: Vintage Pirate Restoration - Mast design

    Welcome to the Woodenboat forum John!
    George in post #3 is correct about making two halves first and cutting the bolt rope groove on them and then gluing up the halves. This should be done prior to making any taper or shape to the mast blank. This insures that the bit will not choke and over heat in the cut from chip build up. Once the ball bit has done its work on the two halves and they are glued up. You can be followed with the ball bit to smooth out the groove a bit. A mahogany or other hard wood insert at the heel of the groove prior to using the ball bit will create a stronger point of insert for the head board and bolt rope. This can be slightly flared/rounded off, on the very bottom by hand to make inserting the bolt rope easier. The two halves should have the vertical grain aligned athwart ships to give the strongest resistance to the bending of the mast off to leeward. The fore and aft flex will allow the sail to be flattened when working to weather.
    Jay
    Last edited by Jay Greer; 06-07-2019 at 12:43 PM.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Location
    Saint James, NY
    Posts
    22

    Default Re: Vintage Pirate Restoration - Mast design

    Quote Originally Posted by Hugh MacD View Post
    Sounds like a fun project If you're planning on being able to reef, I'd be inclined to go with the trach thought. Bolt ropes make for very inefficient reefability unless you cut the sail so you have slugs below the reef points. Looking forward to pics of the project,,,you're teasing us John!
    Thanks Hugh. Your point on reefability is well taken. Since the sail has not been made yet the comments re: slugs will be noted if that is the route taken.
    I didn't mean to tease. My original post had a link to where photos are posted of the project. I volunteer at the Bayles Boat Shop in Port Jefferson, NY and I am in charge of this pirate restoration. It has been a lot of fun and I've learned a lot and not without a lot of anxious moments thrown in. This is my first ever attempt at this sort of thing so I've been proceeding cautiously.
    If you want to see photos of the Pirate project please paste the following link into your browser: www.lisec.org. Then go to the 'Boat Shop' drop down menu and select 'Builds and Restorations. You'll find the Pirate listed under 'Current Projects'. If you run into any problems accessing the site please let me know. Besides working on boats I'm the webmaster for our organization also. Hope you visit us!

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Location
    Saint James, NY
    Posts
    22

    Default Re: Vintage Pirate Restoration - Mast design

    Quote Originally Posted by Jay Greer View Post
    Welcome to the Woodenboat forum John!
    George in post #3 is correct about making two halves first and cutting the bolt rope groove on them and then gluing up the halves. This should be done prior to making any taper or shape to the mast blank. This insures that the bit will not choke and over heat in the cut from chip build up. Once the ball has done its work on the two halves and they are glued up. You can be followed with the ball bit to smooth out the groove a bit. A mahogany or other hard wood insert at the heel of the groove prior to using the ball bit will create a stronger point of insert for the head board and bolt rope. This can be slightly flared/rounded off, on the very bottom by hand to make inserting the bolt rope easier. The two halves should have the vertical grain aligned athwart ships to give the strongest resistance to the bending of the mast off to leeward. The fore and aft flex will allow the sail to be flattened when working to weather.
    Jay
    Thanks Jay. Unfortunately, as I replied to George, that train has already left the station. I like the hardwood insert at the heel of the groove and will surely use that idea (assuming I go with the bolt groove at all). After I cut the sitka plank to it's rough dimension, and before gluing it up I flipped it around so the grain is opposing athwart ships Is that what you were emphasizing in your reply?

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Location
    Saint James, NY
    Posts
    22

    Default Re: Vintage Pirate Restoration - Mast design

    Quote Originally Posted by johngsandusky View Post
    All of my spar builds have used lacing or external track, so I can't help. Welcome aboard, see you on the water.
    Thanks. Hopefully we will. She'll be moored in Mt. Sinai Harbor when finished so it's a distinct possibility.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Germany
    Posts
    39

    Default Re: Vintage Pirate Restoration - Mast design

    Do you know this German website?

    http://www.holzpirat.org/die-segeljolle/bauplane/

    They have a lot of detail pictures and hints...

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Port Townsend WA
    Posts
    12,588

    Default Re: Vintage Pirate Restoration - Mast design

    Quote Originally Posted by JohnJ View Post
    Thanks Jay. Unfortunately, as I replied to George, that train has already left the station. I like the hardwood insert at the heel of the groove and will surely use that idea (assuming I go with the bolt groove at all). After I cut the sitka plank to it's rough dimension, and before gluing it up I flipped it around so the grain is opposing athwart ships Is that what you were emphasizing in your reply?
    The vertical grain, if the wood is quarter sawn, the run of the grain should face the beam and not fore and aft. The verical grain will resist bending of the mast.
    The flat grain will face fore and aft and allow the mast to bend, thereby flattening the sail when the boat is sailing hard on the wind with maximum tension on the sheet.
    Hope all works out well for you and your little ship!
    Jay

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Location
    Saint James, NY
    Posts
    22

    Default Re: Vintage Pirate Restoration - Mast design

    Quote Originally Posted by tobias View Post
    Do you know this German website?

    http://www.holzpirat.org/die-segeljolle/bauplane/

    They have a lot of detail pictures and hints...
    Tobias. Yes we have been contact with Malte and his group quite extensively. They are excited to have news of a Pirate here in the U.S.A. and we have been keeping them abreast of the restoration. The detail plans have proved invaluable to moving this project along.
    Thanks for the reply.

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Between Bourgeoisie and Proletariat - Australia
    Posts
    3,593

    Default Re: Vintage Pirate Restoration - Mast design

    Here's a thread that may be of interest; http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthre...-mast-boom-etc

    Thinking of reefing - I'm inclined to agree with Ian in post #7 of that thread.
    It's all fun and games until Darth Vader comes.

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Central Coast, Ca
    Posts
    23,338

    Default Re: Vintage Pirate Restoration - Mast design

    I would seriously consider getting an .025 kerf band saw blade, making a fixture to keep the mast oriented to the blade and just sawing it back in half. Then the groove with the correct tooling and glue it back together. It will save time and agony.

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Rockland Maine USA and Woodbridge, Suffolk, England
    Posts
    379

    Default Re: Vintage Pirate Restoration - Mast design

    Quote Originally Posted by JohnJ View Post
    Thank you for your reply. Unfortunately, it's already glued up. Not having built a mast before I failed to forsee the issue. I intuitively was thinking that the bolt slot could be more critical then first met my eye and you confirmed that. Thanks for the heads up on that. As for alternative systems; I was thinking in lieu of a bolt groove I would dado out for an internal track (thought it would look cleaner) or proceed with the bolt groove and may use a track system such as the internal round track system from Tides Marine. Any thoughts on either approach?
    In that case, I think I would go with an internal track set flush as you describe - that would be a neat solution.

    Cheers -- George
    To be truly free to live, one must be free to think and speak.

    A C Grayling

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Sound Beach, NY
    Posts
    3,835

    Default Re: Vintage Pirate Restoration - Mast design

    Quote Originally Posted by JohnJ View Post
    Thanks. Hopefully we will. She'll be moored in Mt. Sinai Harbor when finished so it's a distinct possibility.
    We will for sure. There are only a few wooden boats there and I have one. Her pic is my icon, name is Wandering Star, 39' ketch.

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Location
    Saint James, NY
    Posts
    22

    Default Re: Vintage Pirate Restoration - Mast design

    Thanks for all the previous replies. The pirate mast has been fully shaped except for mortising out for the mast sheave (questions on that to follow) and some final sanding but I now have a more pressing question concerning a repair to a loose knot that (unfortunately) is in the mast. It is located about 7” above the point where the forestay hound & shroud stays will be secured (through-bolted) and I’m not sure whether I should either remove & then epoxy in the existing knot, re-drill for a fabricated dowel of sitka spruce, or effect some other type of repair as yet to be determined.
    The first photo posted below shows the mast after only the fore facing radius had been shaped and then two photos of the knot. The aft radius (as shown in the 1st knot photo) has yet to be shaped but you can see that the knot will be well off-center from the apex of the aft facing radius. The 2nd knot photo shows the view looking at the port-side flat of the mast.
    I will certainly welcome any practical guidance on how best to effect this repair.

    pirat mast.jpg

    aft & port side view.jpg

    port side view.jpg

  21. #21
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Port Townsend WA
    Posts
    12,588

    Default Re: Vintage Pirate Restoration - Mast design

    Since the mast is now shaped it would be extremely difficult to mortice in a bolt rope groove! You need to consider using sail track now. That knot might not or might result in a mast failure. Many Scandinavian boats have masts that have one or more knots in them. But now would be the best time to address it. A twelve to one double ended scarf would be the best way to go. I would add, at least, a foot between the beginning of the two tapers making the entire inlay three feet or more in length. This is to avoid a hard spot in the flexing of the spar. Again, the vertical grain faces athwart ships.
    Jay

  22. #22
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Rockland Maine USA and Woodbridge, Suffolk, England
    Posts
    379

    Default Re: Vintage Pirate Restoration - Mast design

    That's a pretty nasty looking knot!

    I would do exactly as Jay says – scarf in a new piece the depth of the knot, so as to remove it.

    And no way would I try to plough in a bolt rope groove at this stage.


    Cheers -- George
    To be truly free to live, one must be free to think and speak.

    A C Grayling

  23. #23
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Location
    Saint James, NY
    Posts
    22

    Default Re: Vintage Pirate Restoration - Mast design

    Thanks for both replies. I basically discarded the bolt rope approach about a week back and decided to go with an external track. My thinking is a 5/8" track will be sufficient given she is only 5m in length and the mainsail is approximately 78 sq ft. I'm looking at bronze track (Rig Rite) or SS (Schaefer).
    As for the repair; although it will require more (unanticipated) work I ave to agree that spreading the stress loads over a longer scarfed length would very likely avoid the point loading that would occur with my more simplistic approach (i.e. re-drilling for a spruce dowel). The knot depth is approximately 5/8" and I have sufficient material left over from trimming the tapers to accomplish the scarf repair. Also, the grain orientation should be nearly identical to the underlying mast structure at that location.

  24. #24
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Port Townsend WA
    Posts
    12,588

    Default Re: Vintage Pirate Restoration - Mast design

    Lets us know how it turns out.
    Jay

  25. #25
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Norwich,United Kingdom
    Posts
    6,321

    Default Re: Vintage Pirate Restoration - Mast design

    Quote Originally Posted by Jay Greer View Post
    Lets us know how it turns out.
    Jay
    I suspect that Jay shares my belief that it will turn out to be rather heavy with a metal track.

  26. #26
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    se pa (Bristol PA)
    Posts
    3,455

    Default Re: Vintage Pirate Restoration - Mast design

    Quote Originally Posted by JohnJ View Post
    Thanks for both replies. I basically discarded the bolt rope approach about a week back and decided to go with an external track. My thinking is a 5/8" track will be sufficient given she is only 5m in length and the mainsail is approximately 78 sq ft. I'm looking at bronze track (Rig Rite) or SS (Schaefer).
    As for the repair; although it will require more (unanticipated) work I ave to agree that spreading the stress loads over a longer scarfed length would very likely avoid the point loading that would occur with my more simplistic approach (i.e. re-drilling for a spruce dowel). The knot depth is approximately 5/8" and I have sufficient material left over from trimming the tapers to accomplish the scarf repair. Also, the grain orientation should be nearly identical to the underlying mast structure at that location.
    GOOD decision! bolt rope is a PITA, you could make it look a bit more traditional by recessing the track... just saying.. nice school ya'll seem to have up there. welcome aboard!
    Denise, Bristol PA, Oday30, Anchor Yacht Club, On tidal Delaware River. my current project; http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthre...0-Ducker-Resto

  27. #27
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Port Townsend WA
    Posts
    12,588

    Default Re: Vintage Pirate Restoration - Mast design

    Be sure to leave enough flat on the after side of the mast to allow a thin strip of mahogany to space the underside of the track. Otherwise you will run into problems when you varnish and foul the underside of the track.
    Jay

  28. #28
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Location
    Saint James, NY
    Posts
    22

    Default Re: Vintage Pirate Restoration - Mast design

    Quote Originally Posted by Jay Greer View Post
    Lets us know how it turns out.
    Jay
    I definitely will do that.

  29. #29
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    victoria, australia. (1 address now)
    Posts
    54,884

    Default Re: Vintage Pirate Restoration - Mast design

    The wooden mast for the Cadet I restored last year has bronze sail track and bronze cars, but I have also fitted out a 2nd hand aluminium mast and the cars slide quite happily up inside the bolt rope track. It's under 1/3 the weight of the wooden one.

  30. #30
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Location
    Saint James, NY
    Posts
    22

    Default Re: Vintage Pirate Restoration - Mast design

    Quote Originally Posted by debenriver View Post
    That's a pretty nasty looking knot!

    I would do exactly as Jay says – scarf in a new piece the depth of the knot, so as to remove it.

    And no way would I try to plough in a bolt rope groove at this stage.


    Cheers -- George

    Jay, George, et al. Thanks for all the input.
    On the scarf; the knot is just under 5/8" in depth so I plan on taking it down to just about 3/4". Using a 1:12 scarf (as suggested) would require a 9" scarf length. If I use your 12" suggested length then the scarf would be 1:16 (just saying). I don't for a moment think the math matters much here as I understand the intent is to spread the discontinuity over as considerable a length as possible so as to mimic (as closely as possible) the normal, undistorted stresses of the original structure. That being said I will go with a 3' stopped scarf joint. I'll be sure to take some photos of my progress and share with the community.

  31. #31
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Location
    Saint James, NY
    Posts
    22

    Default Re: Vintage Pirate Restoration - Mast design

    It will be heavier but at this point I believe the choice is clear. The only question is whether to use an internal or external track. The external would definitely have less weight/foot and bronze would likely be just slightly heavier than SS. So the selection there, in my mind, boils down to appearance.

  32. #32
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Location
    Saint James, NY
    Posts
    22

    Default Re: Vintage Pirate Restoration - Mast design

    Quote Originally Posted by Jay Greer View Post
    Be sure to leave enough flat on the after side of the mast to allow a thin strip of mahogany to space the underside of the track. Otherwise you will run into problems when you varnish and foul the underside of the track.
    Jay
    I understand your point and I do have a few(?) questions concerning the track (and mast design) in general. After nixing the bolt groove I 'thought' I would install an internal track and recess it into a dado. Besides looking 'cleaner' I also felt that the small amount of stock removed would offset (minimally) the increased weight of the track. Then I thought that since the bolt groove was no longer in the design (with its associated 'negative' weight) I would now have a heavier mast. To compensate I thought I would change the profile of the mast (see thread #1 for profile) starting just above the gooseneck to a slightly tear dropped shape (kinda similar to a Kenyon 2331 mast shape shown below). with no bolt groove I would plane a flat face for a sail track. After incorporating all these new design elements I felt the mast design would still be structurally sound and probably lighter aloft (overall I felt some pretty some good design tradeoffs).
    2331-mast.jpeg
    But now with this 'knotty' issue I'm somewhat stymied as how best to proceed. I could still go with my above thought process or just accept the overall weight gain resulting from the groove omission, the sail track hardware and now an extra hardwood 'spacer'. Help!

    PS. The owner is not intending for this boat to be a racer. It will be used strictly for recreational day sailing and for introducing and teaching his young son the joy of sailing. But that doesn't mean I want to throw good design and performance elements out the window.

  33. #33
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Location
    Saint James, NY
    Posts
    22

    Default Re: Vintage Pirate Restoration - Mast design

    Quote Originally Posted by DeniseO30 View Post
    GOOD decision! bolt rope is a PITA, you could make it look a bit more traditional by recessing the track... just saying.. nice school ya'll seem to have up there. welcome aboard!
    Thanks Denise. We are proud of our small organization and we're fortunate to have a good group of guys (and occasional gals) as members who just plain enjoy working on boats. We're always trying to get more and more community involvement with our programs but at the same time we have income to stay afloat (we are a non-profit). It's a delicate balance but one we're all dedicated to preserving.
    Good luck with you're Ducker restoration. It looks to be every bit as challenging as the Pirate (which is the point after all...isn't it?)

  34. #34
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    se pa (Bristol PA)
    Posts
    3,455

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by JohnJ View Post
    Thanks Denise. We are proud of our small organization and we're fortunate to have a good group of guys (and occasional gals) as members who just plain enjoy working on boats. We're always trying to get more and more community involvement with our programs but at the same time we have income to stay afloat (we are a non-profit). It's a delicate balance but one we're all dedicated to preserving.
    Good luck with you're Ducker restoration. It looks to be every bit as challenging as the Pirate (which is the point after all...isn't it?)
    For some reason the ducker doesn't seem to be difficult to restore the hard part is keeping myself focused which has been impossible lately!

    Funny, on the Facebook group I must get one or two a week telling me to replace the plank instead of splineing it, I haven't even made a decision what to do on it planks yet, although I'll probably do splines.

    I'd consider an aluminum Pole on your resto, and use the wooden one for "show".

    Sent from my LG-M430 using Tapatalk
    Denise, Bristol PA, Oday30, Anchor Yacht Club, On tidal Delaware River. my current project; http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthre...0-Ducker-Resto

  35. #35
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Port Townsend WA
    Posts
    12,588

    Default Re: Vintage Pirate Restoration - Mast design

    Since that mast has a very big knot that must be addressed, it might be cheaper to start anew with proper stock and run a correct bolt rope groove before the glue up and shaping of the stick. The existing mast could be scarfed, to eliminate the knot followed by paint or varnish and selling it in that state before any hardware is applied. It could also be sold as is!
    Jay

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •