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Thread: Adventures of 'yeswhen', a boat with a lot of questions

  1. #106
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
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    Between Bourgeoisie and Proletariat - Australia
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    Default Re: Adventures of 'yeswhen', a boat with a lot of questions

    Looking at post #102 - is the wood darker around those penetrations? Under the glass?
    Could be water getting in. Can you see the inside of that area?

    I'd be inclined to do what you did to the area on the side, under the stanchion. Grind it back and check out that dark wood.
    Any penetrations in the deck or deck/hull join above?


    PS.
    I think you should chuck away the bog. Is hardens too hard for wood, its brittle, it doesn't penetrate into the timber and form as good a bond as thickened epoxy. Fairly soon it'll flake off but not before its allowed fresh water to live under it long enough to farm some rot. On that note, never add thickened epoxy unless you've given it a good lick of thin epoxy just before.

    And ah... #90 - if you literaly don't know how to sail, you'd do worse than getting some dinghy sailing experience. Sailing isn' that hard, maintaining a boat - yeah, that's different.
    It's all fun and games until Darth Vader comes.

  2. #107
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Wongawallan Oz
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    16,576

    Default Re: Adventures of 'yeswhen', a boat with a lot of questions

    Quote Originally Posted by Siquando View Post
    Cracks have appeared on the outer third layer of my Oregon cold molded hull. They appear only towards the rear of the hull, on both sides. Someone suggested this could be vibration from the motor or rudder. Has anyone else experienced this?
    Attachment 91835 Attachment 91836
    Quote Originally Posted by Siquando View Post
    cracks in timber vertical where nails are. Here is another photo
    Attachment 91837
    ‘can’t see any of these photos
    Larks

    “It’s impossible”, said pride.
    “It’s risky”, said experience.
    “It’s pointless”, said reason.
    “Give it a try”, whispered the heart.

    LPBC Beneficiary

    "Keep away from people who try to belittle your ambitions. Small people always do that, but the really great make you feel that you, too, can become great!"

  3. #108
    Join Date
    Aug 2020
    Location
    Yamba NSW OZ
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    19

    Default Re: Adventures of 'yeswhen', a boat with a lot of questions


  4. #109
    Join Date
    Aug 2020
    Location
    Yamba NSW OZ
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    19

    Default Re: Adventures of 'yeswhen', a boat with a lot of questions


  5. #110
    Join Date
    Aug 2020
    Location
    Yamba NSW OZ
    Posts
    19

    Default Re: Adventures of 'yeswhen', a boat with a lot of questions

    73198f4f-f1a2-427d-97a4-a7ce8b7b9981.jpg
    Hope these photos load, did about 15 hull repairs - Deck hull joins, splits in outer layer of hull, pressure dings. All glassed over and protected.
    Next, sand back these steel plugs to bright metal, anti-rust and glass over. A little concerned about that black looking section in the photo above. Could this be rot or some reaction to the wood touching metal?

  6. #111
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    Jul 2007
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    Wongawallan Oz
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    Default Re: Adventures of 'yeswhen', a boat with a lot of questions

    Quote Originally Posted by Siquando View Post

    Next, sand back these steel plugs to bright metal, anti-rust and glass over. A little concerned about that black looking section in the photo above. Could this be rot or some reaction to the wood touching metal?

    If you’re talking about the vertical cracks in this photo



    if the cracks are indeed caused by rust you will most likely find that the whole fastening is rusted, not just the screw head/surface. So you’ll really need to replace the fastening altogether and depending what you find you have a couple of relatively easy options: If the fastening unscrews or pulls out cleanly you could drill the hole larger to get back to solid wood all around and use larger fastenings or, if the holes are completely manly - drip them wider still, plug the holes with timber plugs and glue and then drill in new fastenings nearby.
    Larks

    “It’s impossible”, said pride.
    “It’s risky”, said experience.
    “It’s pointless”, said reason.
    “Give it a try”, whispered the heart.

    LPBC Beneficiary

    "Keep away from people who try to belittle your ambitions. Small people always do that, but the really great make you feel that you, too, can become great!"

  7. #112
    Join Date
    Aug 2020
    Location
    Yamba NSW OZ
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    19

    Default Re: Adventures of 'yeswhen', a boat with a lot of questions

    Siquando has a cold molded (Oregon) hull with steel plugs embedded into the hull that are attached to the chainplates. They had started rusting. I have sanded them back to find some black wood around them. Some of this wood is soft, but not canned tuna soft. I don't know how the boat was made or if I can remove the cap on these plugs (if there is a cap) To repair I was going to everdure (epoxy wood preserver) the wood around the plugs. I was then going to use rule marine metal cleaner and protecter to clean the plugs, then a sca rust converter and sealer. Then coat with epoxy glass and coat with norglass NoRust All Surface primer. Does this sound like a good way to treat this problem? My concern is there could be rust between the wood and plug, beyond the surface.

    221781041_1791042317732476_5896263993988241995_n.jpg229382681_381193616694571_7559351383252523686_n.jpg221732635_512332066520397_5081946648660060703_n.jpg

  8. #113
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    Aug 2020
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    Yamba NSW OZ
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    Default Re: Adventures of 'yeswhen', a boat with a lot of questions

    Thanks Larks

  9. #114
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    Jul 2007
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    Default Re: Adventures of 'yeswhen', a boat with a lot of questions

    I just reread my post and noticed what fun autocorrect had with it:

    "if the holes are completely manly - drip them wider still" - should have read "if the holes are completely manky - drill them wider still"


    ​But in answer you your question: no that really doesn’t sound like a good solution to the problem......unfortunately. The Everdure won’t do anything to treat the rot nor to reinstate any integrity into the rotten timber, likewise cleaning the rust won’t reinstate any integrity into the fastenings which are more than likely beyond saving, going by the look of the steel that is exposed and the black timber around them. If they are what’s holding your chainplates to the boat I’d be very concerned the integrity of the rig, when they give way your mast will fall over....... and sadly they look pretty close to being ready to give way.

    But before panicking - how hard would it be to drift the top fastening out from inside the boat to get a decent look at it? Is there a nut holding it on from inside? That looks like the worst one and might give you a better idea of what you’re up against.





    The photos are a bit confusing, the exposed steel “caps" in the second photo don’t look like they line up with your stays so I’m wondering which "chainplates" they are attached to?

    Can you get any pics of how they look from inside the boat?




    Larks

    “It’s impossible”, said pride.
    “It’s risky”, said experience.
    “It’s pointless”, said reason.
    “Give it a try”, whispered the heart.

    LPBC Beneficiary

    "Keep away from people who try to belittle your ambitions. Small people always do that, but the really great make you feel that you, too, can become great!"

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