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Thread: Adventures of 'yeswhen', a boat with a lot of questions

  1. #71
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    Aug 2000
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    Bay of Islands,N.Z.
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    Default Re: Adventures of 'yeswhen', a boat with a lot of questions

    Very comfy looking.

  2. #72
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    Sep 2009
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    Sydney OZ.
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    Default Re: Adventures of 'yeswhen', a boat with a lot of questions

    Boob knowledge eh
    Quote Originally Posted by WX View Post
    I remember being told you could remove the additive by pouring it through a loaf of bread.
    Xanthorrea

  3. #73
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
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    2,948

    Default Re: Adventures of 'yeswhen', a boat with a lot of questions

    The other problems with putting metho through bread are (1) it takes a LOT of vegemite to hide the taste; and (2) toasting metho-soaked bread is a really really really bad idea. Just drink the stuff neat!

  4. #74
    Join Date
    Apr 2019
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    Aust
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    Well... questions have escalated to another level. We have got given whatever paperwork was there from the build and it's pretty amazing. For now the first page, mentioning a lot "Nevis", which from my googleing around shows an american boatbuilder referred to this name.

    Is our boat based on a Nevis design then?

    Pretty interesting to see how he basically went bigger on everything from the original design.

    Someone can read this language better than us, although we're slowly getting better at it... what do you see?

    Cheers!


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  5. #75
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    Jun 2013
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    Default Re: Adventures of 'yeswhen', a boat with a lot of questions

    Nevins was a top boatbuilder who had a set of "rules" for scantlings. The Americans on the forum would probably know more.

  6. #76
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    Mar 2011
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    Gold Coast Australia
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    Default Re: Adventures of 'yeswhen', a boat with a lot of questions

    Quote Originally Posted by gypsie View Post
    That lead in the bow is odd.
    To induce hogging perhaps?
    Looks like 60kgs or 70kgs?

    Cool adventure
    Since the vessel appears to have new chain did the obviously fastidious owner possibly halve the chain locker supply and substituted lead to trim.

    Aboard WB I cut my 5/16 chain back to 25 m from 75m which is a lot of weight for a small boat.

    The little antenna gizmo may well have a magnetic tip a very useful tool.

  7. #77
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    Jun 2013
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    Default Re: Adventures of 'yeswhen', a boat with a lot of questions

    If she had a different name she may have been used for offshore racing, in which case the lead could have been used to induce bow-down trim to reduce the rating.

  8. #78
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Port Stephens
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    22,446

    Default Re: Adventures of 'yeswhen', a boat with a lot of questions

    A lot of older boats were built with no engine or just a small engine with a small fuel tank, and just one battery. Add a bigger engine, more fuel and an extra battery, and the boat needs weight in the bow to compensate.

    Rick

  9. #79
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    Apr 2010
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    South Australia and Tasmania
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    There is a stainless stem fitting up for sale on Gumtree in Adelaide at the moment. I don't know how you'd work out whether it will fit your boat but let me know if you want me to have a look, take measurements etc. Could even be worth you making up a physical template somehow and I could offer it up and see if it fits.

    Sent from my CPH1851 using Tapatalk

  10. #80
    Join Date
    Apr 2019
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    Aust
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    I think from all the above theories what Rick says seems to make sense. I believe she was an ocean racer in the past (a radio license from when she was launched states her intentions) and I have found an old plugged shaft-hole (better names for that must exist) higher than the one that its currently being used by the Beta 20 on board.

    Things are escalating and slowing down at the same time as the weather allows both to happen. We've got ourselves to be in a cold and damp place and it's hard to get the chill out of the body to have productive days, so we're taking it as it comes.

    Since last updates, we have been focusing on stopping the water from coming down below as much as possible. We've spotted more rot (surprise!) on different areas of the deck and we've temporarily overbored, epoxied and redrilled two stanchion bases with wooden backing plates, washers and bolt and nut. We've also stopped the water from coming down through the starboard chainplate, as it had done for some time damaging tools and equipment that was sitting on the boat.

    First mate has been focused on the starboard handrail, as it was rotten almost all the way (but at least it did not let water in!) and we've been crashing our heads trying to find a similar one or a solution. The teachings from that came down to actually have to use our first dynel to cover some of the exposed timber since the old handrail took the canvas when we took it off, practising with fillers and seeing what result we get.

    This jobs have been teaching us confidence, have been our first epoxy experiences and understanding, and have brought an immediate feedback as there's substantially less water coming in as it was before, but at the same time we're realising the amount of work to be done on top of the standard wooden boat owner style type of thing

    Small portholes were also a drip drop party, but on those ones we believe we've done a "proper" job. I'm not sure of the material, silver but not aluminium, some sort of cast bronze or so. They're old and they use glass, but since they're the two small ones in the forward part of the main cabin we simply opened them (as there function was once upon a time), cleaned all the old bedding apart (a mix of silicone, sika and foam) and re-bedded with foam and butyl tape. We tried to fill it all up with butyl (since we're not going to open them) but the wear and the 'space' left did not wok, so we put new gasket and then assured the bedding with butyl. Rain is falling as I write and not a drop there.

    More work to come in those lines are some of the side portholes. One of them, and most probably the cause of why the old-ancient depth sounder is not working, leaks quite a bit pretty much where the depth sounder sits and then travels down. This one seems to have a deeper history on the last owner, as there is a ****ton of bog and what not around the area where the porthole is fastened. I can see in the distance of future jobs that we might need to "add" some framing since he's mounted it over an older one, bigger one, and tried to keep it watertight in a... cheap? way.

    I spent yesterday a good amount of daylight and some nighttime into replacing the fuel line coming from the main tank to the day tank since it gave me the shivers to look at it, touch it and think about it. It was reinforced water hose and it was stiff as a rock, all the way. It had a leaky electric fuel pump (which I believe it was ment to be for water), about 3 different copper-pipe "links" and a real good sense of being very old and not being replaced when the new engine came. I have observed this pattern in quite some things in this boat. New things, but kept the old fitting/cable/pipe. Not how I would do things, but I guess that's what we're here for. For now, I put an in-line bleeding bulb to be able to pump fuel into the day tank, although I have ordered and received an electrical fuel pump, I want to try and get the sediment out of the tank one day, or even take it off and completely clean it. But not just yet. So I stick to manual non-clogging and eventually the bulb can help prime the electrical one too.

    I also changed the two primary filters/water separators and cleaned them all up, as well as the engine fuel filter. A good first experience with positive result with the whole bleeding the engine working by the end of the day. When darkness came (early anyway) was time for the oil, and this engine seems to have a simple system with the sump-pump being preinstalled in the system. Changed the oil filter too and seems to be all fine.

    The focus on getting the engine as good as it can be is that we're taking her out of the water next week and we've got a bit of motoring to do to get there. The rig is not to be used since the forestay is off but I will still keep the tension in the haliards that are holding the mast and have a little sail ready in case there's no other option. An anchor and rode will also be ready on deck.

    Will be a fun first trip, with no depth reading and no rig!


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  11. #81
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    Apr 2019
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    Aust
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    Quote Originally Posted by Phil Y View Post
    There is a stainless stem fitting up for sale on Gumtree in Adelaide at the moment. I don't know how you'd work out whether it will fit your boat but let me know if you want me to have a look, take measurements etc. Could even be worth you making up a physical template somehow and I could offer it up and see if it fits.

    Sent from my CPH1851 using Tapatalk

    Thanks Phil!

    Tried to find it, have you got a link?


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  12. #82
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
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    Gold Coast Australia
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    Default Re: Adventures of 'yeswhen', a boat with a lot of questions

    Many boat owners in the PNW used a 60 - 80 W bulb left on permanently to reduce moisture in their vessels.

  13. #83
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    Apr 2010
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    Default Re: Adventures of 'yeswhen', a boat with a lot of questions

    Quote Originally Posted by JorgeR View Post
    Thanks Phil!

    Tried to find it, have you got a link?


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    https://www.gumtree.com.au/s-ad/glen...ing/1221408236

  14. #84
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    Apr 2019
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    Aust
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    Whoa, on the first picture I got excited! But then I saw that is a whole three-dimensional piece (including the stem protection) and that won't fit for sure. The angle is bigger and wouldn't fit without having to cut it off. Infinite thanks Phil!


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  15. #85
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    Apr 2010
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    South Australia and Tasmania
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    No worries, just stumbled upon it and thought it might work. You'd be extra lucky to find all the angles the same though. Unless you know a bloke who is pretty handy with an angle grinder and a welder.....

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