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Thread: El Toro sailboat

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Posts
    11

    Default El Toro sailboat

    Hi Folks - I just picked up and el toro sailboat a few days ago, mostly complete but I just need to find a rudder and dagger board for it.

    It seems to be in decent shape, but I have a few questions -

    How do I go about finishing the wood on the boat? Sand and varnish? or sand it then epoxy over it?
    In the seams, should those be re-epoxied?
    And, are those cracks in the wood an issue?
    What would be suggested to clean up the chips on the boom?

    I am going to have a lot of questions, as I am relatively new to sailing and finish work. As I have read, this boat can be a challenge for a new sailor…

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    Thanks for your patience!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Between Bourgeoisie and Proletariat - Australia
    Posts
    5,282

    Default Re: El Toro sailboat

    What a lovely boat.
    What a lot of varnish! A symphony of bright wood.

    The open joins don't look serious to me - more aesthetic. Do they look like they are harbouring rot? From here they look okay. If they annoy you, some epoxy thickened with sanding dust would fill them. Just make sure none of them are limber holes. (I'd leave them alone).
    The bare end of the gunwhale - I would guess the boat has been sealed with epoxy and then varnished over. In which case; sand back to an agreeable shape, epoxy the bare bits and varnish over.

    The boom - that might be worth closer photographs.
    It's all fun and games until Darth Vader comes.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
    Location
    North Port, Florida, USA
    Posts
    204

    Default Re: El Toro sailboat

    Hey Rob27,
    We used to sail a much used El Toro while a student at college on Long Island's North Shore - Ah, memories.

    You'll love the boat on the water as it handles very well and love it on the hard as it's easy to care for.

    The few repairs we see and addressed by gypsie should be easy to do, albeit a time consumer that'll make you become intimate with the El Toro, and that's "a good thing." If you doubt any part of a plank or wood member's integrity - poke it with a drawing compass needle. If the wood is soft in an area, then a thickened epoxy repair may be necessary.

    Enjoy your repair and restoration effort - you've got a jewel to sail!

    Stay safe, stay healthy.

    J.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Location
    St. Helens, Oregon
    Posts
    2,320

    Default Re: El Toro sailboat

    WOW! Somebody spent some serious scratch on premier lumber for yours! That's beautiful. I had one that was all painted except for the mahogany coaming and I loved it...but then that was my first boat and it supported all those ten year old fantasies. Some sites and threads you'll want to get familiar with are:
    https://www.eltoroyra.org/class-rules.htm
    http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthre...ing-an-El-Toro
    I'm certain a little digging will lead you to plans for building your own daggerboard and rudder, or they're seen occasionally online from someone who's boat has gotten beyond repair. Your profile doesn't say where you are so we can't point you toward anyone in particular. Have Fun!

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2017
    Location
    Berkeley, CA
    Posts
    162

    Default Re: El Toro sailboat

    We have 3 El Toros in our family, two are wood and finished bright. One looks very similar to yours in construction details. Assuming she'll be dry sailed and stored under cover, in general I would just sand and varnish. Keep an eye on those funky miters, but I wouldn't put epoxy in there, you risk making a pocket where water can be trapped. Those cracks in the keel and chine log might benefit from a slug of clear penetrating epoxy sealer (CPES) but if there is no rot they probably aren't a big deal.

    Let me know if you'd like photos or measurements for blades, I'd be happy to post some.

    Have fun!

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Posts
    11

    Default Re: El Toro sailboat

    Thanks for the replies. I am in Northern Wisconsin. We have a lot of small no wake lakes in my area that I am looking to get out on. Bare with me, I am new to all of this!

    So, as I understand I should get some epoxy to cover the exposed worn wood areas? Can someone make a recommendation of what to buy for that? Brand, supplier, easy stuff for a beginner. Something like this -
    https://www.jamestowndistributors.com/userportal/show_product.do?pid=97636


    Would the stuff in the link be sufficient to epoxy the exposed areas?

    How about the seams around the gunwale? Does varnish seal that up? And, can someone recommend a varnish to use? Sand paper grit for prepping for varnish? Hand sand, or mechanical?

    Boom damage - looks like someone tried to bite it...

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    I need to figure out what hardware for the rudder as well. If any leads on that, that would be great!

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    Last edited by Rob27; 06-30-2020 at 10:56 PM.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Posts
    11

    Default Re: El Toro sailboat

    And I need a baton for the sail, I am missing one of them. So, a recommendation on where to get one would be great!

    A shot of the gunwale seams -

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  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2017
    Location
    Berkeley, CA
    Posts
    162

    Default Re: El Toro sailboat

    The rudder fittings look like a standard small boat gudgeon of some sort, you'll want a pair of pintles that are compatible.

    The gunwales, I'd just sand those discolored areas to bare wood and revarnish.

    The boom -- I doubt those marks impact the strength of the boom so it's more a question of aesthetics. You could try to just sand a bit to mitigate the ugliness, or you could remove some wood and glue in a sort of dutchman or graving piece of similar wood, with a clothspin scarf, then refinish.

    I'm not sure you need much if any epoxy here, assuming you are dry sailing the boat, keeping it cleaned out after use, allowing it dry, and keeping in that big garage or otherwise protected from the elements. Epoxy is great stuff for many applications but these boats were built without it and if well cared for don't need it. My father in law, who is handy but not a boat guy, taped a bunch of seams on one of our woodies and I wish he hadn't, that boat's varnish actually needs more upkeep than the other without epoxy because the epoxy needs more UV protection. The epoxy is yellowing under the varnish and in an ideal world I'd remove it.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Posts
    11

    Default Re: El Toro sailboat

    What would be the recomendation with this screw hole on the bow? The plan is to varnish the outside of the hull.

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