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Thread: local varieties of seafood

  1. #36
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    Default Re: local varieties of seafood

    Copper River Salmon when home .
    “Lambi” , ( conch) , in the islands .
    No farmed fish. Guck .

  2. #37
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    Default Re: local varieties of seafood

    Quote Originally Posted by Breakaway

    Ling. ( Red Hake) Just had some the other day a bud dropped off. These are rarely offered in fish markets because the flesh turns mushy very quickly. Fresh caught locally, they offer a buttery, flavorful flesh. We love 'em. They are long and skinny; sort of like a fat eel and nearly as slimy. They don't fight much. But, oh, so good. Here's my bud, Mike, with a medium sized one.

    [ATTACH=CONFIG
    35338[/ATTACH]


    Kevin
    Looks like you have a different species you call Ling.

    Here's the West Coast version



    http://lingcodfishing.net/

    https://anglersclub.com/tips/oregon-ling-cod/

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lingcod
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  3. #38
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    Default Re: local varieties of seafood

    We catch ling in the Irish Sea.

    Usually a grey colour though, not russet like that one
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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  4. #39
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    Default Re: local varieties of seafood

    About the only thing locally that carries any notoriety would be Fanny Bay Oysters.
    Nosce te ipsum

  5. #40
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    Default Re: local varieties of seafood

    Looks like you have a different species you call Ling.
    Yep. Different altogether.

    Usually a grey colour though, not russet like that one
    I think they are the same species, Nick. They vary in color somewhat, depending upon the bottom composition and time of year. Also, they will tend to get a silver/grey cast ( like many fish) after being deaded and iced.

    Kevin
    There are two kinds of boaters: those who have run aground, and those who lie about it.

  6. #41
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    Default Re: local varieties of seafood

    Looks like you have a different species you call Ling.
    Yep. Different altogether.

    Usually a grey colour though, not russet like that one
    I think they are the same species, Nick. They vary in color somewhat, depending upon the bottom composition and time of year. Also, they will tend to get a silver/grey cast ( like many fish) after being deaded and iced.

    Kevin
    There are two kinds of boaters: those who have run aground, and those who lie about it.

  7. #42
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    Default Re: local varieties of seafood

    Quote Originally Posted by Steve McMahon View Post
    Are Prairie Oysters not local to you?
    I suppose they could be, but I wouldn't eat that food even if I could see it!

    What are you doing about it?




  8. #43
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    Default Re: local varieties of seafood

    Quote Originally Posted by C. Ross View Post
    I’ve had smoked Mississippi catfish and carp. It’s pretty good!
    One genuine Winnipeg specialty is smoked goldeye (Hiodon tergisus).

    What are you doing about it?




  9. #44
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    Default Re: local varieties of seafood

    Saltwater ling in the Atlantic is probably common ling, Molva molva. Freshwater ling cod, aka burbot and a whole bunch of other names, is the closely related Lota lota.

    Not sure what that west coast one would be.

    What are you doing about it?




  10. #45
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    Default Re: local varieties of seafood

    While I've seen it mentioned in lists, I have to shout out halibut. Fantastic flavor - though not cheap.

    Here in VT, ice fishing produces tons of perch. Fried up (usually breaded & deep fried) it is very tasty. Then there are brookies (trout) fried in some butter in a cast iron pan over an open fire when camping. Doesn't get any better than that.
    "If it ain't broke, you're not trying." - Red Green

  11. #46
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    Default Re: local varieties of seafood

    Quote Originally Posted by Flying Orca View Post
    Saltwater ling in the Atlantic is probably common ling, Molva molva. Freshwater ling cod, aka burbot and a whole bunch of other names, is the closely related Lota lota.

    Not sure what that west coast one would be.
    It was in one of my links. Never seen the latin name before: Ophiodon elongatus.
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  12. #47
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    Default Re: local varieties of seafood

    I caught a 24" King salmon last night, and had it for dinner an hour later. Living the good life.

  13. #48
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    Default Re: local varieties of seafood

    Quote Originally Posted by J.Madison View Post
    I caught a 24" King salmon last night, and had it for dinner an hour later. Living the good life.
    Some variation of this was quite common when I lived in Astoria. Various types of salmon. And oysters, steelhead, razor clams, sturgeon, mussels, and halibut. Now, living in Portland, I'm mostly dependent upon the fishmongers - unless a buddy drops by with a care package.
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  14. #49
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    Default Re: local varieties of seafood

    Saltwater ling in the Atlantic is probably common ling, Molva molva.
    It's:

    Screen Shot 2019-04-11 at 3.05.30 PM.jpg

    Kevin
    There are two kinds of boaters: those who have run aground, and those who lie about it.

  15. #50
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    Default Re: local varieties of seafood

    Quote Originally Posted by Breakaway View Post
    Where are our poets? This Hake deserves a haiku!
    There's a lot of things they didn't tell me when I signed on with this outfit....

  16. #51
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    Default Re: local varieties of seafood

    Quote Originally Posted by George Jung View Post
    Where are our poets? This Hake deserves a haiku!
    How about a limerick?

    There is fish called a hake
    Which never lives in a lake
    It's found in the sea
    Where all tasty fish be
    And an excellent meal it does make.
    Last edited by BrianY; 04-11-2019 at 02:24 PM.
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  17. #52
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    Default Re: local varieties of seafood

    I have to admit that I am a fresh fish snob and though I love fishing and do a lot of it I won't bring any home to put in the freezer. Mostly it's catch and release but I will keep a couple for a fresh meal at times, often as shore lunch or a late brunch after fishing the morning. As Cris and Keith stated Walleye is king here in Minnesota for eating but my wife likes Crappies and panfish so sometimes I will filet enough of those to keep her happy.

    1526323_215802608606651_291194787_n.jpg
    Walleyes are often active after dark or in low light conditions. Trego believes in taste and release fishing.

    10409525_304572236396354_957129394810351308_n.jpg
    Early fall Walleye, Voyageurs National Park.

    Bruce
    Last edited by hnsbrc; 04-11-2019 at 02:38 PM.

  18. #53
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    Default Re: local varieties of seafood

    Walleye is amazing. It and halibut are at the top of the list for me
    Nosce te ipsum

  19. #54
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    Default Re: local varieties of seafood

    Quote Originally Posted by Breakaway View Post
    It's:
    Oh, THAT one. That's the problem with colloquial names for fish - the older names tend to be shared by a bunch of species.

    What are you doing about it?




  20. #55
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    Default Re: local varieties of seafood

    Quote Originally Posted by Old Dryfoot View Post
    Walleye is amazing. It and halibut are at the top of the list for me
    Around here they are often known as "pickerel", which is a bit daft by my standards (hellooooo, Esox niger!), but whatever. Pickerel cheeks are a delicacy akin to scallops.

    What are you doing about it?




  21. #56
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    Default Re: local varieties of seafood

    Our best known would be Cromer crabs and then there are the inevitable cockles and whelks (which go really well with garlic mayonnaise if you get the chance to try them) and then there are the usual inshore fish.Sea trout crop up from time to time and there are soles inshore if the fishermen know where to look.Still some herring around in season,but they are a hard sell these days and our Dutch neighbours are happy to get them.

  22. #57
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    Default Re: local varieties of seafood

    Quote Originally Posted by Flying Orca View Post
    Around here they are often known as "pickerel", which is a bit daft by my standards (hellooooo, Esox niger!), but whatever. Pickerel cheeks are a delicacy akin to scallops.
    Pickerel is the name I know from my youth as well, so I try to stick to Walleye now. Because people look at you funny when they think you're telling them Pike is a tasty fish.
    Nosce te ipsum

  23. #58
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    Default Re: local varieties of seafood

    Four years in Maine, I ate an average of ten lobsters a week when I was on the coast. I knew a lot of lobster boat haulers and often gave them to me for free. I went home one weekend and mt parents welcomed me and said they were going out for lobster! Let me tell ya, that rare cheeseburger tasted great.

  24. #59
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    Default Re: local varieties of seafood

    At the end of the salmon trolling season in 1980, I sat with a bunch of fishermen complaining about the poor season, lamenting that they would have to work in the winter, while we ate Dungeness crab until we couldn't eat anymore. Probably several hundred dollars of crab....
    Elect a clown expect a circus

  25. #60
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    Default Re: local varieties of seafood

    In terms of commercial seafood you can get lobster year round, although it is pricey and a bit harder to find in the winter. Local scallops are only available fresh during the season (late November through Mid April). Haddock, halibut, hake, swordfish, tuna and very occasionally cod are available, but the quality is generally pretty poor locally since most fish are landed down south (Portland) and "fresh" fish is anywhere from a 3-4 days to weeks old when it gets here. You an also get crab meat (you can only buy whole crabs direct from fishers not in the stores). Clams, muscles and oysters are available, but risky due to frequent wide spread closures. There hasn't been a shimp fishery in Maine for quite a few years. Atlantic salmon is also available, but it is hard to get the local stuff since it comes from all over the place (Canada, Norway, etc.). In my opinion farmed Atlantic Salmon is too fatty and not worth buying. I do get some each year directly from the local salmon farm. That fish is better than what you can buy in the store simply because it is fresh - still alive when you get it. A great deal of the fish sold in the stores is FAS (frozen at sea) although it is sold thawed. The local fish monger gets his fish from the same supplier as the grocery store.

    As far as recreational fishing goes, you can catch trout in the local lakes and streams. Ocean fishing is much more limited. The only fish you can catch reliably is mackerel. You can occasionally catch small pollock or cod. I know people who catch halibut and tuna, but that requires a boat that can go out 25 to 50 miles and many people go for years without catching a tuna. In general the local waters are pretty fished out.

    In general the quality of local seafood is poor except for lobster and scallops in the winter.

  26. #61
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    Default Re: local varieties of seafood

    Quote Originally Posted by Bobcat View Post
    At the end of the salmon trolling season in 1980, I sat with a bunch of fishermen complaining about the poor season, lamenting that they would have to work in the winter, while we ate Dungeness crab until we couldn't eat anymore. Probably several hundred dollars of crab....
    Helping a friend bring a boat from the Abacos to New York, we caught a 35-40 lb. blackfin tuna. Only 5 of us aboard. First & last time I had to stop eating tuna sashimi because I was too full.
    "If it ain't broke, you're not trying." - Red Green

  27. #62
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    Default Re: local varieties of seafood

    I need to define what I mean with local. Within 30 nautical miles up or down the coast and within sight of land and within easy walking distance from the shore and within easy rowing distance upriver.

    Our lookal seafoods caught in the brackish sea water or in the river mouths or lakes are with Swedish names in italic and with commercially fished species in bold letters:

    Strömming=Herring Traditionally salted in firkins by the fishermen at their camps before bringing the salt fish home. Nowadays often fresh or frozen. Eaten fried or boiled or smoked or baked in oven or anything in between in many dozens of varieties. Anything from salt herrings boiled with potatoes to the most elaborate dishes.
    Fermented herring was popular in times long gone they say but the practice died out many generations ago. On the Swedish coast some 50 nautical miles to the west they still uphold the tradition and eat it with flat bread and potatoes.
    We quit fishing herring for househiold needs and quit eating herring a couple of years ago. Many others did too. I miss the taste. The herring got too poisoned with borate fire retardants.
    Those chemicals should be strictly controlled worldwide.
    Mankind is a part of the food chain whether we want it or not with herring as a very important part of the diet. One can almost say that mankind spread north to eat herring. Man has eaten herring for as long as there has been a Baltic sea for the herring to live in and any Homo Sapiens around to eat it. If you cannot eat herring without risking your health it is more than time to stop pollution!

    Sik=Whitefish Fried or smoked or baked in oven or used in more elaborate dishes. Smoked is best. Makes wonderful fish soup with potatoes and carrots and peas. I like fish soup and smoked whitefish is one of my absolute favorites.

    Gädda=Pike Made to fish balls or fried or baked in oven. By far best as fish balls. Woderfully tasty fish balls with onions. One of my favourite foods. The biggest pikes taste sawdust and are only good for animal fodder. A few still make lutefisk the old way from dried pike and birch ash.

    Abborre=Perch Fried or smoked. Both are good. Some boil them in the same kettle as the potatoes.

    Gös=Pikeperch Usually fried. A delicacy.

    Braxen=Bream Smoked. Usually goes to animal fodder theese days but as late as the 60-ies it was a staple food in early summer.

    Gråsäl=Grey seal Used as any meat. Makes wonderful meatballs they say.

    Vikare=Ringed seal Used as any meat. Makes wonderful meatballs they say.

    Nejonöga=Lamprey No idea how they eat those things but they say lamprey is a delicacy. Personally I prefere to live in doubt.

    And when you are fortunate enough to catch one the occasional wild lax=salmon or öring=salmon trout you eat and enjoy but the commercially caugt ones go for high prices to the rich. They are usually fried or smoked.

    Of cause there is lots farmed lax=salmon available in any amount in every supermarket but it tastes of the same bone meal fodder as farmed salmon from anywhere else and is not worthy of mentioning as seafood only as a functional protein fodder for humans. Farmed salmon seems to be a staple in modern cooking and can be used in any number of ways. In my oppinion it is tasty only as fish soup with potatoes and carrots and peas and so on. In any other form I eat it as bulk protein.

    A few people eat mört=roach and id=ide and siklöja (a very very small species of whitefish eaten whole bones and intestines and all) but to most of us they are only animal fodder. In the past people ate simpa=horn sculpin and ruda (a very small and bony carp) especially during hard times.

    Vassrötter=reed roots dredged out of the mud at river mouths and in shallow bays using long handled hooks and then dried and ground to a starch rich flour which could be mixed with either real flour or flour from the dried inner bark of scot's pine trees and baked to bread or boiled to porridge saved the life and health of lots of people during the "poor years" in the 1860-ies. Reed roots are nutricious and pine bark flour isn't bad either according to modern science but the processing is too laborious to make it anything but an an emergency backup...... let's hope that we will never again have any such emergencies.
    Reed roots is the only local vegetable seafood that I can think of.

    There is also kräfta=crayfish in a few rivers just north of my geographic limits but they are too few to catch nowadays. In the early to mid 1900-s they were more plentiful and when people who lived close by those rivers took a break from working they often sat down by the river bank and tried to catch some crayfish. It was relaxing and a suitable activity during breaks from proper work. The crayfish was sold apiece to village shopkeepers who sold them througs delis in the big cities as posh delicacis for the upper crust. Crayfish wasn't eaten locally.
    Last edited by heimlaga; 04-11-2019 at 04:16 PM.
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  28. #63
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    Default Re: local varieties of seafood

    My fishing uncle had a Mittle-European recipe for planked carp. Stuff a carp with shredded carrot, onion and celery. Staple it to a cedar shingle. Prop up facing a moderate campfire. Bast it with butter. (Just like a shad roast.) When flaky, throw away the fish and eat the shingle.

  29. #64
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    Default Re: local varieties of seafood

    Fresh caught anchovies which I catch using a cast net. Salmon if we are lucky.



    There is always crab when in season.

    Last edited by Ted Hoppe; 04-11-2019 at 04:28 PM.
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  30. #65
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    Default Re: local varieties of seafood

    Quote Originally Posted by J.Madison View Post
    I caught a 24" King salmon last night, and had it for dinner an hour later. Living the good life.
    Jealous.

  31. #66
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    Default Re: local varieties of seafood

    Smelt. Haven’t seen them mentioned yet. Pretty tasty.

    https://visitaroostook.com/blog/smel...northern-maine

  32. #67
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    Default Re: local varieties of seafood

    I got all the farmed eastern oysters I could eat this winter on my $6 shell fishing permit so on the half shell with Meyer lemon juice first, oyster stew second. In summer I used to be able to catch bluefish which I either baked in white wine and butter or smoked. I love swordfish but no longer eat it because it is way too far up the food chain and full of poisons. Chicken lobsters are very weak in flavor and 2 pounders cost an amazing amount per lb since they’re no longer native. So much for local seafood on Cape Cod.
    A society predicated on the assumption that everyone in it should want to get rich is not well situated to become either ethical or imaginative.

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  33. #68
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    Default Re: local varieties of seafood

    We have pretty good eats here


    • Albacore.
    • Bigeye Tuna.
    • Blue Shark.
    • Bluefin Tuna.
    • Bonito Shark.
    • Chinook Salmon.
    • Coho Salmon.



    A great local fishmonger with local caught is [COLOR=rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.870588235294118)]Jon's Fish Market in Dana Point Wharf.

    [/COLOR]
    Screen Shot 2019-04-11 at 3.14.44 PM.jpg

    https://www.yelp.com/biz/jons-fish-market-dana-point-4

    The fresh fish is great, eating there no so great. They can't cook, which is a total shame
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  34. #69
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    Default Re: local varieties of seafood

    If the fish has green stuff around it, or carpet on the floor it ain't a fish market, it's a fish boutique.
    "If it ain't broke, you're not trying." - Red Green

  35. #70
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    Default Re: local varieties of seafood

    Quote Originally Posted by Joe (SoCal) View Post
    We have pretty good eats here


    • Albacore.
    • Bigeye Tuna.
    • Blue Shark.
    • Bluefin Tuna.
    • Bonito Shark.
    • Chinook Salmon.
    • Coho Salmon.



    A great local fishmonger with local caught is [COLOR=rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.870588235294118)]Jon's Fish Market in Dana Point Wharf.

    [/COLOR]
    Screen Shot 2019-04-11 at 3.14.44 PM.jpg

    https://www.yelp.com/biz/jons-fish-market-dana-point-4

    The fresh fish is great, eating there no so great. They can't cook, which is a total shame
    They screw up tuna steaks? Bastards!
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