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Thread: Skookum Maru

  1. #176
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Quote Originally Posted by Favorite View Post
    Umm, well ... far be it from me to promote scofflawism, but I know of a documented boat that has got by without the state since 1937 and I've seen many at the visitor dock without the state. If it really bothers you, I wouldn't be afraid to forget to paint it on.
    Quote Originally Posted by ron ll View Post
    I’ll vote for your second example Chris, looks great and still easily readable. As far as scofflawism, Snoose is documented but the graphics are far from legal (too small, wrong place, no WA), but I’ve been boarded several times and it’s never been mentioned.
    I'm shocked, SHOCKED to find that scofflawism is going on in here!

    Thanks Favorite and Ron. It's useful to be reminded that there is such a thing as carrying obedience to mindless regulation too far. Paul is right as well - there are no other ports named Seattle. Nor any other boats named Skookum Maru, most likely. It's not as if there is any chance she could be mistaken for another boat. Ok then.

    - Chris

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  2. #177
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Attractive lettering, but will it be clear and easy to read at distance? Does that matter?
    As the former owner of a boat with an Icelandic name which was almost illegible on the radio......

  3. #178
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Rita was documented, always had been, but we only put 'Seattle' on the transom. We were never questioned anywhere, including during our two visits from the boots practicing their sinister vessel boarding skills. BTW, I've been underway on Skookum Maru and also cruised alongside her. She looks super underway.

    This album is worth a visit if only for the two or three sholts of Skookum. Rita's in it too, and a fine sampling of other nice boats as well.

    LINK
    Last edited by Lew Barrett; 05-26-2019 at 02:16 PM.
    One of the most enduring qualities of an old wooden boat is the smell it imparts to your clothing.

  4. #179
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    From the same album...another nice one of SM

    And an unremarkable shot of both the boats but with Rita showing just "Seattle" in the hail. Never a word about it anywhere including the pirate infested waters of the Gulf Islands and Big Bay, BC. Oh! And notice who she's parked alongside!

    The album that I've linked to in these posts is worth a scan if one is a fan of classic wooden motor yachts...or B17s for that matter. He's a good photog.

    Here she is parked up next to Rita at Bell Street, prusambly from the same photo session. That is another Monk design or at least Monk influenced design, the post war built 54 ft. Shain "Forevermore." Morris Shain and Monk worked together on various projects and builds. This photo is interesting to me because it shows three good examples of Monk's evolving styles. The owner of Forevermore (Dave and Heather Ellis) told me that Forevermore was drawn by Monk. That's why I mention it here.
    Last edited by Lew Barrett; 05-26-2019 at 02:26 PM.
    One of the most enduring qualities of an old wooden boat is the smell it imparts to your clothing.

  5. #180
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Quote Originally Posted by cstevens View Post
    despite Paul's clever repurposing
    In the immortal words of the great philosopher David St Hubbins:


    fineline.jpg

    --Paul

  6. #181
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Quote Originally Posted by Decourcy View Post
    Attractive lettering, but will it be clear and easy to read at distance? Does that matter?
    As the former owner of a boat with an Icelandic name which was almost illegible on the radio......
    I think it will be fine. The USCG regs for lettering do not actually require it to be legible (!) and I'm not too concerned about it in any case. The font is certainly more readable than many I see on the water.

    Quote Originally Posted by Lew Barrett View Post
    Rita was documented, always had been, but we only put 'Seattle' on the transom. We were never questioned anywhere, including during our two visits from the boots practicing their sinister vessel boarding skills. BTW, I've been underway on Skookum Maru and also cruised alongside her. She looks super underway.

    This album is worth a visit if only for the two or three sholts of Skookum. Rita's in it too, and a fine sampling of other nice boats as well.

    LINK
    Quote Originally Posted by Lew Barrett View Post
    From the same album...another nice one of SM

    And an unremarkable shot of both the boats but with Rita showing just "Seattle" in the hail. Never a word about it anywhere including the pirate infested waters of the Gulf Islands and Big Bay, BC. Oh! And notice who she's parked alongside!

    The album that I've linked to in these posts is worth a scan if one is a fan of classic wooden motor yachts...or B17s for that matter. He's a good photog.

    Here she is parked up next to Rita at Bell Street, prusambly from the same photo session. That is another Monk design or at least Monk influenced design, the post war built 54 ft. Shain "Forevermore." Morris Shain and Monk worked together on various projects and builds. This photo is interesting to me because it shows three good examples of Monk's evolving styles. The owner of Forevermore (Dave and Heather Ellis) told me that Forevermore was drawn by Monk. That's why I mention it here.
    Thanks Lew. That's Linda Evans' account on Flickr, yes? I've followed her there for a while now. Nice shots of Skookum Maru and Rita though!

    Quote Originally Posted by _QB_ View Post
    In the immortal words of the great philosopher David St Hubbins:


    fineline.jpg

    --Paul
    - Chris

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  7. #182
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Was thinking of heading up to Blaine to tackle a few projects on Skookum Maru today but various events intervened so instead Dash and I had a day at the Center for Wooden Boats and Northwest Seaport. After wandering around the docks a bit we went aboard the Virginia V, which I haven't been on since Tory and I were married aboard more years ago than I care to remember.







    Then we sailed model boats on the pond for a while before having lunch.







    Nothing wrong with that.
    - Chris

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  8. #183
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    I think it might be time to clean the workshop. Work up early to confront the mess. Here's what it looked like at 5:30 this morning:



    And now after a few hours of organizing I can see the top of the table saw. And the floors. And the walls.



    That's a bit better. Next project is to organize some tools:





    But first, another boat project. This one a bit smaller than the others:





    This old and well play-tested Dumas Lightning kit was given to us by a friend a while back. It's been sitting on a shelf waiting for us to have time to fix it up. Inspired by our pond boat sailing yesterday, Dash and I decided to bring the old Lightning back to life and try it out. My wife has promised to make us some new sails as the old ones are falling apart. With those, a bit of paint and some new rigging we should be back in the water soon.
    - Chris

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  9. #184
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    This is a beautiful project. My hat is off to the originator.

  10. #185
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    One of my brothers was married on the Virginia as well in 1995.

  11. #186
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Quote Originally Posted by Lonely Grandpa View Post
    This is a beautiful project. My hat is off to the originator.
    Thanks! And welcome to the forum.

    Quote Originally Posted by navydog View Post
    One of my brothers was married on the Virginia as well in 1995.



    2006 for us. Second best day of my life, topped only by the day Dash was born.
    - Chris

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  12. #187
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Quote Originally Posted by navydog View Post
    One of my brothers was married on the Virginia as well in 1995.
    I, too was married on the Virginia V. 1990. Now, I am unmarried again though through no fault of the site of the marriage.

  13. #188
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    I knew a fellow got married on the Virginia V in the 1970's. Didn't work out, much like all of his other marriages. Can't blame the boat
    Elect a clown expect a circus

  14. #189
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Hey, my wife and I got married on a pirate ship in the desert. We have so far managed to survive the event just fine. Boats and marriage can work together.
    -Jim

    Sucker for a pretty face.
    1934 27' Blanchard Cuiser ~ Amazon, Ex. Emalu
    19'6" Caledonia Yawl ~ Sparrow

    Getting into trouble one board at a time.

  15. #190
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Well we were married on the Virginia V and honeymooned in the San Juans and Gulf Islands aboard Temptation, a 30' Chris Craft Constellation that we had at the time. Since then she's stuck with me through the whole Perihelion debacle, through the ongoing saga of Petrel, and now to Skookum Maru, which started with the full refastening project. So I think we are in it for life

    Jim... a pirate ship in a desert? There's a story there for sure!
    - Chris

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  16. #191
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Yah - we need more details on said pirate ship in the desert.
    "If it ain't broke, you're not trying." - Red Green

  17. #192
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Clearly your wife is a Saint.

  18. #193
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Yes, pirate ship in the desert.



    but probably not really a story to clutter up Chris’s thread with though.
    -Jim

    Sucker for a pretty face.
    1934 27' Blanchard Cuiser ~ Amazon, Ex. Emalu
    19'6" Caledonia Yawl ~ Sparrow

    Getting into trouble one board at a time.

  19. #194
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Quote Originally Posted by jsjpd1 View Post
    Yes, pirate ship in the desert.



    but probably not really a story to clutter up Chris’s thread with though.

    Great photo Jim! We are all just back from a few days cruising aboard Skookum Maru. Details to come...
    - Chris

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  20. #195
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Nice! Trip reports are always good.
    -Jim

    Sucker for a pretty face.
    1934 27' Blanchard Cuiser ~ Amazon, Ex. Emalu
    19'6" Caledonia Yawl ~ Sparrow

    Getting into trouble one board at a time.

  21. #196
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Last week, on the first Thursday in June, we loaded up the car with provisions, clothing, sundries, dog and family and headed north. Back in Seattle we left deadlines pressing, emails unanswered, chores undone, bills to pay, piles of laundry to be folded, toys scattered about the house, and all of the other clutter and debris of life on land. Those demands would be waiting for us on our return but for a few days we would escape our cares in the traditional manner - by running away to sea.

    Our journey began with the normal chaos of frantic last-minute preparations, late departure, items forgotten, returning home for said forgotten items before setting out again, and so on. But eventually we all made it to Blaine with patience mostly intact, unloaded our car full of supplies, people and dog, and shipped aboard Skookum Maru.

    The original plan had been to depart immediately, cross the Strait of Georgia, and anchor for the night in Active Cove on Patos Island, about two hours away from Blaine. But by the time we had walked Addie, stowed our provisions, opened the boathouse curtain (a bit of a chore involving ropes and straps and pulling on rusty hanks), started the motor and made all ready to cast off it was a good three hours later than we had planned. Not wanting to navigate a new anchorage in the dark, we decided to spend the night at the visitor dock in Blaine and head out in the morning.




    Dinner: Tagliatelle marinara, salad with balsamic vinaigrette, Sea Cider Pippins apple cider. A simple meal but a long day and hard work turned it into a feast.


    [continued]
    - Chris

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  22. #197
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    The next morning Dash woke me up at 5:30 am, with a level of excitement normally reserved for Christmas. I’m an early riser by nature but that was pushing things even for me. However once he’s up there is no chance he will stay in bed so I abandoned the comfort of my bunk and we began our day. We were in no rush at this point so we took a few hours for coffee, a light breakfast and final pre-cruise chores before getting underway for Friday Harbor at 0845. We departed Blaine under a high overcast that was quickly burning off and a light wind from the SW. A great day to be on the water.



    Once we cleared Birch Point and headed across the Strait of Georgia, Dash said he wanted a chance to steer. I humored him thinking that at age six he might not be able to hold a heading but there was nothing to hit out here, and that in any case he would soon tire of the monotony and toil of steering a straight course. But I should have had more faith. He held our course for over an hour, steering for the mark that I gave him with more patience, attention, and skill than many adults in my experience.



    I will admit to feeling more than a little parental pride just then.

    Once across the Strait we passed Patos Island, where we had planned to anchor the previous night.



    Active Cove is tiny, with two mooring buoys and room for maybe a couple more boats at anchor. We poked in to have a look around and saw two boats there already. I’m glad we didn’t try to get in there at night. We will save that for another time. Instead we continued down President Channel past Waldron and Orcas Islands, into San Juan Channel and finally to Friday Harbor where we found a guest slip for the night and then spent the rest of the afternoon walking the town and visiting the shops...



    ...before having dinner at a local restaurant with a view of the water and a decent steak frites on the menu, followed by a lovely, delicate sunset...



    …and a quiet evening with LEGOs and the start of a jigsaw puzzle.



    [continued]
    - Chris

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  23. #198
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    We only had a few days for this cruise and we did want to anchor out for at least one night to work out the details of managing the dinghy and getting the dog ashore. So we spent Saturday morning engaged in various chores aboard the boat before heading for Orcas Island and Deer Harbor.

    But first on the way out of Friday Harbor we toured through the anchorage to get a shot of Commencement, a purse seiner built in 1926 at the Skansie Boat Works in Gig Harbor, and now converted to pleasure use.



    We had clear skies and sun as we made the short run back up San Juan Channel...



    …then through narrow Wasp Passage…



    ...and less than an hour later we were anchored behind Pelican, an ex-U.S. Bureau of Fisheries patrol boat.



    She’s handsome but maybe somewhat past due for refastening. She has a new owner though, as she was sold last year. So with a bit of luck she will get the maintenance she needs.

    Our first task after securing the boat at anchor was to lower the dinghy and take Addie and Dash ashore for a walk and some exercise. Getting the dinghy overboard went easily enough, although the davit could use a bit of grease. The bigger challenge was how to get the kid and the dog safely into the dinghy. Dash got in easily enough once I showed him how to step in without pushing the boat away from the swim step.

    For getting Addie into the dinghy, I had looked at steps, ramps, harnesses, hoists and various other methods of coaxing or coercing a somewhat elderly, reluctant, fifty-pound dog into a small boat. But in the end we settled on a simpler manual approach and bought a large cooler for the cockpit...



    ...with the idea that Addie would step onto the cooler, from which point, in theory at least, I could lift her over the transom into the dinghy. This plan was a bit of a gamble as we didn’t know if Addie would consent to take part in the maneuver. Or if my aching back would either for that matter. But it worked out pretty much as we had hoped. Addie did let us know that she was much more of a farm girl than a sailor, and that small boats were not at all her preferred mode of transport, but in the end we got everyone aboard for the row to the dinghy float at the Deer Harbor Marina.



    (please pay no attention to the painter dangling in the water - that’s just Dash “fishing”)


    [continued]
    - Chris

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  24. #199
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    The marina was closed up for the night by the time we made it ashore but we walked around, wandered the beach and took a few more boat photos. This lovely boat in particular caught my eye:





    That’s the real thing. An honest New England lobster boat complete with dry stack exhaust, likely connected to a Deere or a Cummins (no Yanmars or Volvos here), a trap puller, and an opening on the starboard side so the lobsterman-or-woman can handle the traps and the helm at the same time. No picnic boat this one. She’s a long way from home though. I wonder what her story is?

    Shore excursion complete we rowed up a ways to get a look at another local workboat icon anchored in the harbor.



    That’s Tamarack, ex-B.C. Forestry Patrol, now another pleasure boat conversion down here in WA, USA. And we pulled around our own boat for a few snaps of her as well.



    I’m biased, but I think she holds her own in this company.


    [continued]
    - Chris

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  25. #200
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Shore excursion accomplished we spent the rest of the afternoon on boat chores. And took some photos of the interior since we don’t have any recent ones and various people (well, my mother at least) have been asking for some...









    … followed by dinner: Madras curry with tofu and steamed cauliflower, followed by brownies baked in the oven of our new diesel stove.

    We are still learning how to use the stove well so the brownies ended up little burnt on the edges and a little gooey in the middle, but they were no less delicious for that and we ate them happily while making more progress on our puzzle. And then we ended our day by falling asleep by the anchor light from Pelican, accompanied by the sound of waves slapping the hull and the other quiet noises of a well-protected anchorage.




    [continued]
    - Chris

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  26. #201
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    On Sunday, our final day of cruising, we started the day by finishing the puzzle, ensuring that whatever else might happen that day we could be satisfied in at least one task successfully accomplished.



    After which we took another row ashore to walk Addie and pick up a few things from the marina store, and then made pancakes and bacon on the diesel stove - the meal for which it is most ideally suited.





    And really, is there any higher achievement in cuisine than that?

    With breakfast eaten, coffee drunk and dog walked we stowed the dinghy and raised anchor for home. For a bit of variety we decided to head back the long way around via Harney Channel, which runs between Orcas and Shaw Islands. The channel is both scenic and busy, used by ferries and all manner of craft large and small.

    With calm water and overcast skies we passed through Harney Channel, then through even narrower Obstruction Pass, and then out into Rosario Strait and north for Blaine.



    At seven knots the return trip would be around five hours. Not an overly long run but still made easier by several changes of watch, as first Dash then Tory took turns at the helm. And soon enough we raised Birch Point and the channel for Blaine Harbor and home to unload, wash down and put Skookum Maru away in her boathouse until our next voyage.



    Epilogue:

    I thought our trip log would end with the shot of Skookum Maru at the visitor dock in Blaine on Sunday evening. But then this morning as I drove into the office I was stopped by the raising of the Ballard Bridge…



    ...to let this lovely gal through. That’s Zodiac, looking Bristol condition and ready for another season of cruising. A nice way to ease into the work week, that.
    - Chris

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  27. #202
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Great trip & she more than holds her own!
    "If it ain't broke, you're not trying." - Red Green

  28. #203
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    What a great way to spend the weekend. I will now admit to the tiniest bit of boat envy.
    -Jim

    Sucker for a pretty face.
    1934 27' Blanchard Cuiser ~ Amazon, Ex. Emalu
    19'6" Caledonia Yawl ~ Sparrow

    Getting into trouble one board at a time.

  29. #204
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Chris, Thanks for the pictures and narrative. I think the Flying Eagle although still fitted out for commercial work is actually a picnic boat. The lawn chairs are a give away, plus it is spanking clean.

  30. #205
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Nice photo of the Zodiac. Brings back memories for me. I sailed on her for five seasons as chief mate and relief captain. She's one powerful schooner!

  31. #206
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Well done! Beautiful boats along with the scenery, and huzzah the helm time for the rest of the crew! And, to back up just a bit, maybe the most important piece of that cruise was not forcing the departure, waiting for a deliberate morning departure and avoiding a high stress/high risk night anchorage while everything is still being worked out. Not much to be gained by forcing it and sticking to a schedule, and much to be lost if when trying to anchor in an unfamiliar anchorage in the dark, with family.... (you know all that, obviously...well done!)
    Brian

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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Looks like a nice trip, you have come a long way boat wise from petrel. What is the "pan" called you were cooking the pancakes on? Does SM have a autopilot? I finally after a few months finished up the install of mine, looking forward to trying it out.

  33. #208
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Quote Originally Posted by Garret View Post
    Great trip & she more than holds her own!

    Quote Originally Posted by jsjpd1 View Post
    What a great way to spend the weekend. I will now admit to the tiniest bit of boat envy.
    Thanks guys

    Quote Originally Posted by navydog View Post
    Chris, Thanks for the pictures and narrative. I think the Flying Eagle although still fitted out for commercial work is actually a picnic boat. The lawn chairs are a give away, plus it is spanking clean.
    Ah - yes, you are probably right. What I meant is that she obviously started her life as a working lobster boat rather than as a purpose-built picnic boat/lobster yacht/whatever the rich folk on Mt. Desert Island are buying these days.

    Quote Originally Posted by jamo View Post
    Nice photo of the Zodiac. Brings back memories for me. I sailed on her for five seasons as chief mate and relief captain. She's one powerful schooner!
    She looks it. I'd love to sail aboard her some day. The last time I was on a schooner of any sort was...hmmm, a long time ago. 1986 in fact. I was a passenger on the Spirit of Massachusetts escorting the Pride of Baltimore I out of Baltimore Harbor on her last voyage.

    Quote Originally Posted by Boatsbgood View Post
    Well done! Beautiful boats along with the scenery, and huzzah the helm time for the rest of the crew! And, to back up just a bit, maybe the most important piece of that cruise was not forcing the departure, waiting for a deliberate morning departure and avoiding a high stress/high risk night anchorage while everything is still being worked out. Not much to be gained by forcing it and sticking to a schedule, and much to be lost if when trying to anchor in an unfamiliar anchorage in the dark, with family.... (you know all that, obviously...well done!)
    Brian
    Thanks Brian. Yes, that was pretty much my reasoning. A friend who is a private pilot once told me that pilots have a saying; "mountains, night or weather - pick one". Meaning don't try to take on more than one challenge at a time. Plus this isn't R2AK - the goal is to relax and have fun. Better to do that at the dock than to head out for an unfamiliar anchorage in a (still) somewhat unfamiliar boat with an inexperienced crew at night.

    When I was first living aboard Savona back in the late 90s I once took a wedding party from Shilshole Marina in Seattle out to the Bloedel Nature Reserve on Bainbridge Island. The group was staying overnight so I headed back across the Sound solo. It was around 2300 on a beautiful night - flat calm and perfectly clear. Savona was equipped with radar and I had nowhere to be the next day so on a whim I decided to head up to Port Townsend, a five-hour cruise away. I hadn't been there by boat since I was a kid cruising on my parent's boat. But I was young and not particularly cautious, and it seemed like a good idea at the time. So I made my way up the Sound navigating by the VTS separation buoys and various other markers.

    Easy enough, but it was a long, long night and by 0400 the next morning I was getting very tired. At that point I was entering Oak Bay just south of port Townsend Canal. I had anchored there once before and had a little knowledge of the area so I decided to drop the hook and get some sleep. The moon had long since set by then. There was no light at all. Even by starlight the shore was just a slightly darker shape in the night. I had no chart plotter of course. I think I had a little hand-held GPS but I was far too tired to work out my position on the chart precisely enough to find to a place to anchor. So I approached the beach using radar and the depth sounder until I found a likely spot, set the hook, let out some scope, shut down the motor, switched on the anchor light and turned in.

    A few hours later I woke up to bright sunshine and found myself maybe a hundred yards off the beach. It was a decent-enough spot to anchor as long as it wasn't blowing onto a lee shore. Fortunately it was still calm and I was able to have a quiet breakfast before setting off back down the Sound for home. I'm glad I made that trip back then. It gave me a lot of confidence in navigating using the equipment that I had aboard, in anchoring at night when necessary, and in general boat handling. But those are the sort of journeys that we are supposed to do when we are young and maybe a bit foolhardy so that when we are older, grayer, and more experienced we will know better!


    Quote Originally Posted by Penta2 View Post
    Looks like a nice trip, you have come a long way boat wise from petrel. What is the "pan" called you were cooking the pancakes on? Does SM have a autopilot? I finally after a few months finished up the install of mine, looking forward to trying it out.
    Funny about that pan. It's a griddle. Or at least I think it is. It's about the right size and shape to be a griddle. It has handles and a grease channel like a griddle. It came with the boat and was buried under a pile of pots and pans so I assume it was intended for cooking. But I've never before seen one made of bronze or brass and it has a bit of a strange shape as two of the corners are relieved as if it was designed to fit into a specific spot. So who knows? Maybe it's really an access panel for some long-gone piece of equipment or something like that. But it made a fine griddle nonetheless.

    No autopilot. I've never had one and I've always been a bit reluctant to give over the helm to a mere device. But friends who do use such things really like them so I may break down and add one at some point. I'd be very interested to hear how you like yours.
    - Chris

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  34. #209
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Lynden, Wa
    Posts
    3,578

    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    You don't need autopilot, you have a very capable 1st mate now.
    There's the plan, then there's what actually happens.

    Ben Sebens, RN

    15' Welsford Navigator Inconceivable
    16' W. Simmons Mattinicus double ender ​Matty

  35. #210
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    1,858

    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    "made of bronze or brass"

    Chris, if it is brass don't use it for cooking. Zinc in brass will migrate into your food. It can cause big health issues.

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