Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst ... 23
Results 71 to 85 of 85

Thread: Skookum Maru

  1. #71
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    South Australia and Tasmania
    Posts
    17,298

    Default

    Rope clutch

    Sent from my CPH1851 using Tapatalk

  2. #72
    Join Date
    Feb 2019
    Location
    Van isl BC
    Posts
    5

    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    I wouldn't worry about the brake on the boat trailer winch. I use a standard cheap boat trailer winch with no brake to lift my skiff on to my aft deck and have never had any issues, there seems to be enough mechanical advantage with the winch to easily slowly lower the skiff. Its a beauty day out there now in the straight (sat afternoon) flat calm and sunny skies!
    Last edited by Penta2; 04-13-2019 at 07:45 PM.

  3. #73
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Posts
    3,205

    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Quote Originally Posted by Favorite View Post
    What you need is a check valve for 3/8" line ... running it through a cam cleat would probaly wear it out fast, hunh ?

    Or a switchable up-down ratchet on the handle. Cut the handle off a 3/4" Harbor Freight ratchet and insert that between the handle and the sprocket. That would make it stick out farther tho. If you went crazy you could design a ratchet that went into the handle itself.
    Quote Originally Posted by navydog View Post
    A self tailing winch would easily work. Lowering would use friction around the drum.

    Example: https://rover.ebay.com/rover/0/0/0?m...%2F16023782781
    Quote Originally Posted by Phil Y View Post
    Rope clutch

    Sent from my CPH1851 using Tapatalk
    I've looked at clutches, cam cleats, halyard winches... nothing seems like the perfect solution though. Too fiddly or too modern or just plain unworkable. This style of wire halyard winch with brake seems like it might work though:



    Maybe.

    Quote Originally Posted by Penta2 View Post
    I wouldn't worry about the brake on the boat trailer winch. I use a standard cheap boat trailer winch with no brake to lift my skiff on to my aft deck and have never had any issues, there seems to be enough mechanical advantage with the winch to easily slowly lower the skiff. Its a beauty day out there now in the straight (sat afternoon) flat calm and sunny skies!

    That was my experience with the setup on Savona as well. Mechanical advantage was never a problem. So maybe I'm just being over cautious. And flat calm in the Strait today? Funny - both NOAA and Canada Weather were showing small craft advisory conditions with winds to 30kts all day. Still are in fact. Just goes to show... something. Not sure what. That it's one thing to sit in your chair a hundred miles away from your boat and guess what conditions will be like based on the forecast, and quite another to poke your head out of the harbor and see for yourself I suppose.

    But either way, 30kts in the Strait of Georgia is not something I would go out in voluntarily. Those conditions would rattle the china a bit. Your average working fisherman would probably laugh at that level of caution. I imagine that if you don't go out when it's blowing hard you will spend a lot of time tied to the dock instead of catching fish. But I figure my job is to keep the crew happy and comfortable, and the glassware unbroken.

  4. #74
    Join Date
    Feb 2019
    Location
    Van isl BC
    Posts
    5

    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Well, retract my statement about how nice it was.... you made the right call

  5. #75
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Kailua, HI
    Posts
    87

    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    For a family cruise in a newish boat, this is the prime directive, in my view!

    "But I figure my job is to keep the crew happy and comfortable, and the glassware unbroken."

    BQ

  6. #76
    Join Date
    Dec 2017
    Location
    NW Washington State
    Posts
    82

    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    The forecast has kept us in a few times recently, too. It's one thing to endure something, another to enjoy it. We'd prefer to enjoy if possible, endure only when necessary.

    That bronze winch is a beauty! One thing that might give you peace of mind is to use a loop of line secured at one end to the winch or davit with the other in a prussik knot around the fall. Keep one hand on the prussik and the line will slide through it with no problem. Let go, however, and it will quickly grab tight and arrest the fall. The only disadvantage to this system would be that you use up a hand, which you might prefer to use to maneuver the dink as she goes over the side.

    I have no safety on mine as I winch the 10-foot RIB off the cabin roof, and it's plenty heavy with gas and 8 hp OB. I'm very mindful of the need to keep a hand firmly on the winch handle, and frankly on occasion wish that I had three hands, especially when a breeze makes controlling the thing a bit of a challenge.
    --​Anson, M/V Kingfisher

    Be kind whenever possible. It is always possible. ~The Dalai Lama

  7. #77
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Posts
    3,205

    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Quote Originally Posted by Penta2 View Post
    Well, retract my statement about how nice it was.... you made the right call
    Ah, good to know! Not that I would have made a different decision in any case but it's nice to know that we didn't miss a beautiful day on the water through being over cautious.

    Quote Originally Posted by Boatsbgood View Post
    For a family cruise in a newish boat, this is the prime directive, in my view!

    "But I figure my job is to keep the crew happy and comfortable, and the glassware unbroken."

    BQ
    Quote Originally Posted by Sabre View Post
    The forecast has kept us in a few times recently, too. It's one thing to endure something, another to enjoy it. We'd prefer to enjoy if possible, endure only when necessary.

    That bronze winch is a beauty! One thing that might give you peace of mind is to use a loop of line secured at one end to the winch or davit with the other in a prussik knot around the fall. Keep one hand on the prussik and the line will slide through it with no problem. Let go, however, and it will quickly grab tight and arrest the fall. The only disadvantage to this system would be that you use up a hand, which you might prefer to use to maneuver the dink as she goes over the side.

    I have no safety on mine as I winch the 10-foot RIB off the cabin roof, and it's plenty heavy with gas and 8 hp OB. I'm very mindful of the need to keep a hand firmly on the winch handle, and frankly on occasion wish that I had three hands, especially when a breeze makes controlling the thing a bit of a challenge.
    Ah yes - "enjoy rather than endure" seems like a good thing to aim for. My cruising ambitions have always been more about placid water and calm anchorages than battling the roaring forties around Cape Horn. I'll leave those adventures to Howard Rice and other men braver than I. And I will wish them bon voyage and good health in their expeditions while I enjoy a good book in whatever quiet cove we find ourselves in at the end of the day. We do want to cruise up to Alaska some day though, and I suspect that trip comes with a certain amount of weather and open water.

    As for the winch... it does seem like it will work as-is. Maybe with a prusik or some other sort of safety line, but its easy enough to just remember not to let go of the handle! Ok then.

  8. #78
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Hills of Vermont, USA
    Posts
    28,052

    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    IMHO, "What is it about this that's fun?" days are to be avoided if at all possible. Sometimes you can't - but, if you can, good call!
    "If it ain't broke, you're not trying." - Red Green

  9. #79
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Seattle
    Posts
    6,501

    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Quote Originally Posted by Garret View Post
    IMHO, "What is it about this that's fun?" days are to be avoided if at all possible. Sometimes you can't - but, if you can, good call!
    My former father in law, a fisherman for more than six decades, looked at my boat: " You've got a lot of glass, but you don't to go out when it's bad like I do."

    As I get older the less I want to be out in nasty weather. Coming back for the Wood Boat Festival last September, I bashed into small craft advisory force winds for several hours. Not a problem, not even really unpleasant, but not a lot of fun
    Elect a clown expect a circus

  10. #80
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    1,425

    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Having a pilot / wheel house makes such things bearable. Out in the open these things become foolishness.

  11. #81
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Vancouver Island
    Posts
    1,814

    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Forecast for my area ....

    https://weather.gc.ca/marine/forecas...3&siteID=14305

    I use this service for trip planning and have grown accustomed to it's accuracy (if we dare call it that). Campbell River is at the top end of the Salish Sea, formerly known as the Strait of Georgia , and from there we accessed the Discovery Islands, what I called the start of 'North of Desolation Sound'. From my experience there 25kts seemed to be the magic number when you begin to consider the wind impact on your trip. The 15-25kt forecast alerted you to the possibilities, 20-30 was a go-nogo decision, based on wind and direction of travel. Accolade is quite comfortable from my viewpoint in 6-8' head seas, running off with 5-6', but anywhere in between will get the dishes moving around! Fortunately in that area the wind is usually up or down channel, and there is always a protected anchorage within easy reach.
    We now share the same home cruising area Chris, but I don't know much of it as yet. Best of luck in your adventures; that pic of your son at the helm is a keeper! / Jim

  12. #82
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    San Diego and Gabriola
    Posts
    150

    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Quote Originally Posted by chas View Post
    https://weather.gc.ca/marine/forecas...3&siteID=14305
    I use this service for trip planning and have grown accustomed to it's accuracy (if we dare call it that).
    And it's broadcast on the VHF weather channels, which cover pretty well at least up to Cape Caution. Environment Canada's accuracy has been getting better over the last few years, at least that's my impression. I know global weather models have been getting better.

    Another thing I like is looking at all the lightstation reports. It's a good way to get a big picture. A VHF marine weather channel will recite these for the few lights in its area, but if you have internet access, this page has them all: https://weather.gc.ca/marine/weather...station_e.html

    And also... for automated reporting points, you can see their hourly data for the last 24 hours, which is great for spotting trends and for seeing how bad the last forecast was . E.g. for Entrance Island: https://weather.gc.ca/marine/weather...&stationID=WEL

    One puzzle remains. There is a forecast for North of Nanaimo and another for South of Nanaimo. Sometimes they are merged into a single forecast for the whole Strait of Georgia, but that's rare. Now what is the forecast for Nanaimo itself? Entrance Island is at the same latitude as Nanaimo, and I compared its reports to the two forecasts to try to see which one, or an average of the two, was more accurate. My study was inconclusive...

    --Paul

  13. #83
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    San Diego and Gabriola
    Posts
    150

    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Quote Originally Posted by chas View Post
    From my experience there 25kts seemed to be the magic number when you begin to consider the wind impact on your trip. The 15-25kt forecast alerted you to the possibilities, 20-30 was a go-nogo decision, based on wind and direction of travel. Accolade is quite comfortable from my viewpoint in 6-8' head seas, running off with 5-6', but anywhere in between will get the dishes moving around! Fortunately in that area the wind is usually up or down channel, and there is always a protected anchorage within easy reach.
    And the Strait of Georgia is almost always a confused sea. Tidal currents divide around islands and point in different directions. Just south of Cape Mudge is where the opposite-direction currents, one coming through Johnstone Strait and the other through Juan de Fuca, meet. The whole thing is like a big bathtub sloshing around. So you can be heading in to a 25 knot southeaster, bucking 4-5 foot waves, and here comes a set of 4-5 foot waves at 90 degrees, having bounced off some island or something, and now there are 10 foot deep holes around.

    Your numbers with Accolade would be reasonable for Skookum Maru too. Depending on who's aboard, of course. Chris will figure out what works for him and Victoria and Dash. I found it useful to go out in challenging weather. Skookum Maru has the boat nature. She'll be happy to keep doing her boaty thing no matter what, but she expects you to do your part. It's good to know what that is.

    --Paul
    Last edited by _QB_; 04-15-2019 at 11:09 AM. Reason: s/Veronica/Victoria

  14. #84
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Posts
    3,205

    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Quote Originally Posted by chas View Post
    Forecast for my area ....

    https://weather.gc.ca/marine/forecas...3&siteID=14305

    I use this service for trip planning and have grown accustomed to it's accuracy (if we dare call it that). Campbell River is at the top end of the Salish Sea, formerly known as the Strait of Georgia , and from there we accessed the Discovery Islands, what I called the start of 'North of Desolation Sound'. From my experience there 25kts seemed to be the magic number when you begin to consider the wind impact on your trip. The 15-25kt forecast alerted you to the possibilities, 20-30 was a go-nogo decision, based on wind and direction of travel. Accolade is quite comfortable from my viewpoint in 6-8' head seas, running off with 5-6', but anywhere in between will get the dishes moving around! Fortunately in that area the wind is usually up or down channel, and there is always a protected anchorage within easy reach.
    We now share the same home cruising area Chris, but I don't know much of it as yet. Best of luck in your adventures; that pic of your son at the helm is a keeper! / Jim
    Quote Originally Posted by _QB_ View Post
    And it's broadcast on the VHF weather channels, which cover pretty well at least up to Cape Caution. Environment Canada's accuracy has been getting better over the last few years, at least that's my impression. I know global weather models have been getting better.

    Another thing I like is looking at all the lightstation reports. It's a good way to get a big picture. A VHF marine weather channel will recite these for the few lights in its area, but if you have internet access, this page has them all: https://weather.gc.ca/marine/weather...station_e.html

    And also... for automated reporting points, you can see their hourly data for the last 24 hours, which is great for spotting trends and for seeing how bad the last forecast was . E.g. for Entrance Island: https://weather.gc.ca/marine/weather...&stationID=WEL

    One puzzle remains. There is a forecast for North of Nanaimo and another for South of Nanaimo. Sometimes they are merged into a single forecast for the whole Strait of Georgia, but that's rare. Now what is the forecast for Nanaimo itself? Entrance Island is at the same latitude as Nanaimo, and I compared its reports to the two forecasts to try to see which one, or an average of the two, was more accurate. My study was inconclusive...

    --Paul
    Quote Originally Posted by _QB_ View Post
    And the Strait of Georgia is almost always a confused sea. Tidal currents divide around islands and point in different directions. Just south of Cape Mudge is where the opposite-direction currents, one coming through Johnstone Strait and the other through Juan de Fuca, meet. The whole thing is like a big bathtub sloshing around. So you can be heading in to a 25 knot southeaster, bucking 4-5 foot waves, and here comes a set of 4-5 foot waves at 90 degrees, having bounced off some island or something, and now there are 10 foot deep holes around.

    Your numbers with Accolade would be reasonable for Skookum Maru too. Depending on who's aboard, of course. Chris will figure out what works for him and Veronica and Dash. I found it useful to go out in challenging weather. Skookum Maru has the boat nature. She'll be happy to keep doing her boaty thing no matter what, but she expects you to do your part. It's good to know what that is.

    --Paul

    Thanks Jim and Paul. I have been using the https://weather.gc.ca site as well as the NOAA weather site. I hadn't seen the CA lightstation reports though. Very handy! But my experience is more in Puget Sound, the San Juans and the southern Gulf Islands. I have crossed the Strait of Georgia a few times but I don't really know it yet so I have a hard time picturing what certain weather conditions will be like out on the water. A 25kt southerly in Puget Sound would be no problem. The same winds in the Strait could be a nasty beam sea between Blaine and Sucia or it could be entirely manageable - I just don't know which yet. But I'll learn. I don't mind a little weather for myself and I agree that it's useful to go out when it's a bit rough so you know what to expect. Tory has been out when it's fairly bumpy as well. She's more comfortable in it than several boat owners that I know. But Dash is still getting used to boating and I want him to have some experience with it before we start bouncing around.

  15. #85
    Join Date
    Oct 2018
    Location
    lagunitas, ca, usa
    Posts
    410

    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Naturally, now that the weekend is over, it's calmed down a lot

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •