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Thread: Skookum Maru

  1. #666
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    on my little dinghy I did a similar but DIY method to the CLC product.
    Being a sailmaker / Canvas worker I have a lot of short rolls and offcuts of sunbrella in many lovely colours.
    Basically I sandwiched some eva foam (think yoga mat) inside the sunbrella and screwed it around the gunnel.
    There are a few more step than that to get a nice finish (a nice timber cover to hide the inside edge of the canvas on the inside of the gunnel) but you end up with a nice soft gunnel edge with say 15mm of foam. It's a bit thinner than the CLC product but it's thick enough for coming along side gently.
    You can even match the canvas colour to any other canvas on the boat.
    unfortunately I didn't get any photo's before I sold the dinghy.

  2. #667
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Quote Originally Posted by cstevens View Post
    Thanks! And that is an excellent, excellent point. I should replace the combination of barbed wire, barnacles, and rusty nails that is currently serving as a chafe guard on the dinghy... But seriously folks, I had not thought about that. I'm going to have to get used to having a paint job that I will be reluctant to scuff, even in gentlest manner. At the moment the dinghy just has a wood rub rail. We have a fender that we can throw over the side that at least limits the size of the dents that it makes in Skookum Maru's hull, but that's no longer even remotely sufficient. I'm going to have to add something like this I think.

    https://www.clcboats.com/modules/cat...l-gunnel-guard





    Which really means that I will need to take the dinghy off and bring it up to the shop for paint and general refinishing this winter... That's the problem with making the boat look nice. It just makes more projects!
    I have been re-reading the Aubrey Maturin series, in which oaths are periodically directed at those who might mar the barky's paint through the lubberly handling of a boat, so it was on my mind!

  3. #668
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Advance apologies for thread drift:
    Quote Originally Posted by nrs5000 View Post
    I have been re-reading the Aubrey Maturin series, in which oaths are periodically directed at those who might mar the barky's paint through the lubberly handling of a boat, so it was on my mind!
    I thought of the same books. I'm on another circumnavigation of the series myself. This time, I am listening to a companion podcast called "The Lubber's Hole". I'd say it's closer to "mildly interesting" than "riveting", and with the current environment of overlapping crises, that's just fine with me. Sometimes a gently boring hour is just the thing for an otherwise awful pandemic.
    Also: there is nothing better for making the kids fall asleep in the car.

    /End thread drift.

    Skookum Maru has always been beautiful, but this haul out brings her to a new level. It's great to see someone do so right by such a classic. Thanks for posting the pictures and meditations!

    James

  4. #669
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Quote Originally Posted by James Chilman View Post
    on my little dinghy I did a similar but DIY method to the CLC product.
    Being a sailmaker / Canvas worker I have a lot of short rolls and offcuts of sunbrella in many lovely colours.
    Basically I sandwiched some eva foam (think yoga mat) inside the sunbrella and screwed it around the gunnel.
    There are a few more step than that to get a nice finish (a nice timber cover to hide the inside edge of the canvas on the inside of the gunnel) but you end up with a nice soft gunnel edge with say 15mm of foam. It's a bit thinner than the CLC product but it's thick enough for coming along side gently.
    You can even match the canvas colour to any other canvas on the boat.
    unfortunately I didn't get any photo's before I sold the dinghy.
    Now that's a great idea - I like it! However it's one of those projects that I would love to do and yet I know that I would never get to it. No, the commercial product may not be as nice as what could be fashioned from Sunbrella and some sort of foam, but it has the advantage that I can buy it and install it in a fraction of the time, and spend the time saved in other projects. Like painting the dinghy.

    Quote Originally Posted by nrs5000 View Post
    I have been re-reading the Aubrey Maturin series, in which oaths are periodically directed at those who might mar the barky's paint through the lubberly handling of a boat, so it was on my mind!
    Quote Originally Posted by pez_leon View Post
    Advance apologies for thread drift:

    I thought of the same books. I'm on another circumnavigation of the series myself. This time, I am listening to a companion podcast called "The Lubber's Hole". I'd say it's closer to "mildly interesting" than "riveting", and with the current environment of overlapping crises, that's just fine with me. Sometimes a gently boring hour is just the thing for an otherwise awful pandemic.
    Also: there is nothing better for making the kids fall asleep in the car.

    /End thread drift.

    Skookum Maru has always been beautiful, but this haul out brings her to a new level. It's great to see someone do so right by such a classic. Thanks for posting the pictures and meditations!

    James
    I am a huge fan of Patrick O'Brian too. I started reading the series when he was still alive and writing them, and I well remember the months I would spend in anticipation of the next volume! Since then I suspect I've read the entire series maybe twenty times. I usually read it through once a year or so. Right now I'm in the middle of The Far Side of the World. And yes, I too recall many scenes about not spoiling the paintwork.

    When I started reading POB I was living on Savona and did not have room for a collection of books. So I would buy the first edition hard cover of each volume as it came out, read it, and then give it away. So over the years I bought the entire run of first editions but never kept any of them. Now that I have room I would dearly love to have those books back. I'm buying them again slowly but now they are collectible and cost several times what they did when they were new. Sigh. I read them on Kindle instead but it's not the same.

    As for getting the kid (singular in our case) to sleep, we used to strap Dash into the car, turn on classical music and go for a drive until he fell asleep. That worked for a couple of years until he wised up. After he figured out what we were doing, any time we turned on classical music in the car he would immediately shout "I DON'T WANT TO TAKE A NAP" and no amount of driving around would induce sleep. And he has never napped since. Not once.

    On Skookum Maru, today I sanded the swim step and finished it with Deks Olje #1



    I'm afraid that my finishing job is not quite to the standard of Paul's building effort. However it looks much better than it did at least, and the Deks will give it some protection. And with that job done I'm down to the last pre-launch tasks, which I'll tackle in the morning.

    Then after wrapping up for the evening I drove out to Shilshole and captured this photo of the sun descending through the smoke.



    We hear that a huge cloud of smoke and ash - much worse than we have had so far this season - is heading our way and is due to arrive tomorrow. But I will not complain. Other places are contending with actual fires and I hope that everyone who is in those areas is staying safe.
    - Chris

    Any single boat project will always expand to encompass the set of all possible boat projects.

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  5. #670
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Quote Originally Posted by cstevens View Post

    as for getting the kid (singular in our case) to sleep, we used to strap dash into the car, turn on classical music and go for a drive until he fell asleep. That worked for a couple of years until he wised up. After he figured out what we were doing, any time we turned on classical music in the car he would immediately shout "i don't want to take a nap" and no amount of driving around would induce sleep. And he has never napped since. Not once.

    hahahahahaha.
    There's the plan, then there's what actually happens.

    Ben Sebens, RN

    15' Welsford Navigator Inconceivable
    16' W. Simmons Mattinicus double ender ​Matty

  6. #671
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Quote Originally Posted by pez_leon View Post
    Advance apologies for thread drift:

    I thought of the same books. I'm on another circumnavigation of the series myself. This time, I am listening to a companion podcast called "The Lubber's Hole". I'd say it's closer to "mildly interesting" than "riveting", and with the current environment of overlapping crises, that's just fine with me. Sometimes a gently boring hour is just the thing for an otherwise awful pandemic.
    Also: there is nothing better for making the kids fall asleep in the car.

    /End thread drift.

    James
    Thanks for this, I have 3 plus hours in the car today and a podcast about Aubrey and Maturin is perfect!

    Quote Originally Posted by cstevens View Post
    As for getting the kid (singular in our case) to sleep, we used to strap Dash into the car, turn on classical music and go for a drive until he fell asleep. That worked for a couple of years until he wised up. After he figured out what we were doing, any time we turned on classical music in the car he would immediately shout "I DON'T WANT TO TAKE A NAP" and no amount of driving around would induce sleep. And he has never napped since. Not once.
    Last time my older son napped (he was never a good napper) we were at the family house in Maine. Being a west coast kid, he had and has almost no experience of thunderstorms, and, at age 2 or 3, found the terrifying. A storm was visibly approaching across the bay and he told me to take him up to his room for a nap, which I did. He instantly conked out. 30 seconds later the side of the house was pelted with hail, which was enormously loud as the house is a summer house, with only outside sheathing and shingle siding, no separate interior walls much less insulation. He slept right through the barrage of hail and has never napped again.

  7. #672
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    The truly amusing thing about kids and naps is that I suspect that we parents need the nap more than they do. I know I function better with 15-20 minutes on a couch in the afternoon. Or so I tell myself (yawn).

    This piece of artwork is entited "Waiting for the Travel Lift"



    Topside paint, done. Bootstripe paint, done. Bottom paint, done. Transom varnish, done. Rubrails and guards done. Swimstep, done. Zincs, done. Seacocks, done. Only thing I didn't do is polish the propellor. But only the fish will know about that, and they ain't talkin'.

    I need a nap.
    - Chris

    Any single boat project will always expand to encompass the set of all possible boat projects.

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  8. #673
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    zzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz.....

    [looks fantastic!]
    "If it ain't broke, you're not trying." - Red Green

  9. #674
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru







    Three weeks, about four gallons of paint, a gallon of Deks Olje #1, a quart of varnish and a couple hundred hours of skilled and not-so-skilled labor went into Skookum Maru this time around. Haulouts always take longer and cost more than I planned on but this one was well worth it. She's not leaking too badly, but we are going to let her sit in the slings overnight just in case.
    - Chris

    Any single boat project will always expand to encompass the set of all possible boat projects.

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  10. #675
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    "On Skookum Maru, today I sanded the swim step and finished it with Deks Olje #1"

    How did you sand between the grids? I re-did my swim step last year and sanding between the grids was a PIA. Used a combination of drill mounted sanding discs and hand sanding. Thouth about a portable spindle sander from Grizzley, but they were out of stock.


  11. #676
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Quote Originally Posted by schlaboatnic View Post
    "On Skookum Maru, today I sanded the swim step and finished it with Deks Olje #1"

    How did you sand between the grids? I re-did my swim step last year and sanding between the grids was a PIA. Used a combination of drill mounted sanding discs and hand sanding. Thouth about a portable spindle sander from Grizzley, but they were out of stock.

    I started with a sanding drum in a dremel tool but found that to be more aggressive than I liked. So I resigned myself to doing it by hand using a folded square of 80 grit sandpaper. Then one of the pro paint guys at the yard suggested that I use a wooden paint stirrer as a sanding block and that worked great. Still slow, but I got all of the slots done in a couple of hours that way.
    - Chris

    Any single boat project will always expand to encompass the set of all possible boat projects.

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  12. #677
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    I have a bunch of sticks lying around the shop with various grits of sandpaper glued to them. I spray a sheet of paper with 3M "77" adhesive, stick sticks on them and weight it all overnight then cut the sticks apart. Miracle workers!

  13. #678
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Quote Originally Posted by Hugh MacD View Post
    I have a bunch of sticks lying around the shop with various grits of sandpaper glued to them. I spray a sheet of paper with 3M "77" adhesive, stick sticks on them and weight it all overnight then cut the sticks apart. Miracle workers!
    Brilliant! I am definitely going to steal that idea.
    - Chris

    Any single boat project will always expand to encompass the set of all possible boat projects.

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  14. #679
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Oh she looks gorgeous Chris, you've done a lovely job!!!
    fair winds, Dody
    "They did not know it was impossible so they did it" - Mark Twain
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  15. #680
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Good job on your splendid boat !
    You keep your prop unpainted ?
    I'm very happy with Velox.
    Gerard.
    SCHOONER FOR EVER, GOELETTE A PERPETE

    http://www.goelette-anthea.fr

  16. #681
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Quote Originally Posted by Dody View Post
    Oh she looks gorgeous Chris, you've done a lovely job!!!
    Thanks Dody!

    Quote Originally Posted by Rapelapente View Post
    Good job on your splendid boat !
    You keep your prop unpainted ?
    I'm very happy with Velox.
    Well, yes. However until now I've almost always kept boats in fresh water and marine growth on the prop has never been a problem. The growth on Skookum Maru's prop was all salt water related (barnacles mostly) from when she was moored in salt water up in Blaine but she's now in fresh water. I meant to polish the prop this time out but ran out of time and it didn't seem worth two more lay days in the yard to deal with it. It can wait until next time. But thanks for the suggestion! I might try Velox. I do see plenty of boats using Propspeed but Velox looks like a decent product as well and the prep process seems a bit easier than with Propspeed.
    - Chris

    Any single boat project will always expand to encompass the set of all possible boat projects.

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  17. #682
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Spectacular, Chris! I can't wait to see one of your sunset pics in the new paint.

  18. #683
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    I’ve always had good luck with keeping Snoose’s prop bare bronze. Our friends with a Nordic 37 always put the latest and greatest goop on their prop and they usually have more growth than we do. However they are in a slightly different location which may be a factor.

  19. #684
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Quote Originally Posted by Hugh MacD View Post
    Spectacular, Chris! I can't wait to see one of your sunset pics in the new paint.
    Thanks Hugh. Me too! Sadly, however, it might be a while before we get back on the water. It's going to be a busy autumn.

    Quote Originally Posted by ron ll View Post
    I’ve always had good luck with keeping Snoose’s prop bare bronze. Our friends with a Nordic 37 always put the latest and greatest goop on their prop and they usually have more growth than we do. However they are in a slightly different location which may be a factor.
    Same here Ron. However the number of people who have commented on the state of Skookum Maru's prop is making me self-conscious about it now (it came up on Facebook too. So much for my comment about only the fish will know...) I feel kinda like I'm wearing a well-tailored gabardine suit with a pair of beat-up and grass stained athletic shoes. Sigh.

    Anyhow, despite the state of her lower regions, Skookum Maru spent last night happily taking up in the slings at Canal Boat Yard. This morning I went down to bring her home. The seams were still seeping a bit but the pumps were only running sporadically and all was well under control. So we headed out into the smoke for the brief trip back to Stimson Marina.



    With the help of a dock neighbor I sloooowly walked Skookum Maru into the slip, taking great care of the paint so as to not incur the wrath of the first mate. Job done, and feeling quite satisfied with myself, I was arranging the lines when Shearwater, another beautifully-kept classic, came swooping down the fairway at a rate of knots that had me anxious for her paintwork. The man at the helm gave a sharp spin of the wheel, backed down hard, and brought her straight into the slip without touching a hand to pier or piling. Such was his confidence that he didn't even have fenders out. I might aspire to such elan but I don't know that I will ever achieve it. All the same it was a beautiful thing to watch.

    Skookum Maru is safely home. As always after a haulout she was completely covered in dust and grit. I gave her a quick rinse but she will need a deep clean to get rid of the yard grime that covers every surface, inside and out.



    Haulout done. Now comes the post-haulout blues. I don't know if anyone else feels this way or if it's just me, but I always experience a letdown after hauling out. Sure the topside paint shines and reflects every wave and ripple. The transom varnish gleams. The bottom paint will ward off the slime and marine life for another couple of years. But what I see are the worn spots on the hand rails that still need to be varnished, the shabby paint on the decks that needs to be stripped back and renewed, and the layer of land dust that has seeped into every crevice. I regret the projects that I did not get to (propeller!) and the ones I wish I had done better. My workshop is a disaster. Every hand tool I own is shoved into random buckets and tool bags, in no order whatsoever. As always it will take a few days to set everything right and then I'll feel better about it.
    - Chris

    Any single boat project will always expand to encompass the set of all possible boat projects.

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  20. #685
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    No - you're not alone in that Chris. Remember though, that you see far more than anyone else ever will. Except the prop of course - the whole world has seen that....
    "If it ain't broke, you're not trying." - Red Green

  21. #686
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Quote Originally Posted by Garret View Post
    No - you're not alone in that Chris. Remember though, that you see far more than anyone else ever will. Except the prop of course - the whole world has seen that....
    LOL, thanks Garret But true. And in any case it's done for a couple more years now at least. I think we have only one more big project haulout coming up sometime in the next few years, to wood the bottom. But once that's done we shouldn't have (knock on wood) any more major out of the water projects to do for a few years at least. Although I might take the opportunity to replace the keel shoe the next time we are out. It's pretty beat up, presumably from a long-ago encounter with a rock that is noted in the original log.

    Still, the in-the-water project to-do list is plenty long enough to keep me busy. The local supply of wooden boat projects is not going to dry up any time soon.
    - Chris

    Any single boat project will always expand to encompass the set of all possible boat projects.

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  22. #687
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    You can always dive to clean the prop....

    10 years ago I helped a friend bring his boat up from the Bahamas to NYC. I brought scuba gear & he took one look & said "Oh good!". 320 grit, followed by 600, which was followed by (seriously - I am not kidding) 1200. I asked him if he could feel the difference between 600 & 1200. The reply was "My wallet can". He's gone now (damnit) so I won't speak ill of the dead, but I didn't believe it then & still don't.

    Of course diving in the Bahamas is more funner than up north.
    "If it ain't broke, you're not trying." - Red Green

  23. #688
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Quote Originally Posted by Garret View Post
    You can always dive to clean the prop....

    10 years ago I helped a friend bring his boat up from the Bahamas to NYC. I brought scuba gear & he took one look & said "Oh good!". 320 grit, followed by 600, which was followed by (seriously - I am not kidding) 1200. I asked him if he could feel the difference between 600 & 1200. The reply was "My wallet can". He's gone now (damnit) so I won't speak ill of the dead, but I didn't believe it then & still don't.

    Of course diving in the Bahamas is more funner than up north.
    Wow, well that sent me down a rabbit hole of opinions. At first I thought that polishing to 1200 grit was the sign of an unhinged mind. But on doing some research I find that there are many people who consider that to be entirely reasonable. Some even follow it up with even finer grits and then metal polish and wax. And then there are those who clean it with 80 or 100 and call it good. Apparently polishing it does make a difference in fuel consumption but we are probably talking about $10-$15 worth of cost savings a year given what we spend on fuel right now. Which in my view makes it a vanity exercise. Pretty jewelry for the fish.

    (If we had some huge, wake-dragging thing that burned 15-20 gph I might see things differently. But then if I was the sort of person who wanted a boat like that I expect I would see many things differently).

    At any rate further boatwork is going to be on hold for a little while at least, as I am now planning to drive the VW bus to visit my mother in Baltimore at the beginning of October. Assuming that the COVID trend continues downward that is. Should be an adventure.
    Last edited by cstevens; 09-14-2020 at 01:12 AM.
    - Chris

    Any single boat project will always expand to encompass the set of all possible boat projects.

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  24. #689
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Apologies for the thread drift. But I have a bit more info on Saturn for you. She was built in the early 40s as a seiner in california. During the war she was used by the navy/coastguard to tow barges and likely also hunt submarines. During this time she reportedly carried depth charges. Later in life she was one of the early king crab boats and was sheathed in ironbark where pots came on board. Currently she is powered by a cat and runs two detroit's as gensets. The whole boat is massive and awesome, draws nearly 13' and can pack well over 200 tons. They tend salmon off the alutians and are planning to start dungeness crabbing in the upcoming season. No idea of planking thickness but I'd guess around 2 1/2". Decks are a full 3" and beams are nearly 8" square. Rumor has it she has a sister ship out there but it's been hard to find.

    Pelirrojo

  25. #690
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Quote Originally Posted by Pelirrojo View Post
    Apologies for the thread drift. But I have a bit more info on Saturn for you. She was built in the early 40s as a seiner in california. During the war she was used by the navy/coastguard to tow barges and likely also hunt submarines. During this time she reportedly carried depth charges. Later in life she was one of the early king crab boats and was sheathed in ironbark where pots came on board. Currently she is powered by a cat and runs two detroit's as gensets. The whole boat is massive and awesome, draws nearly 13' and can pack well over 200 tons. They tend salmon off the alutians and are planning to start dungeness crabbing in the upcoming season. No idea of planking thickness but I'd guess around 2 1/2". Decks are a full 3" and beams are nearly 8" square. Rumor has it she has a sister ship out there but it's been hard to find.

    Pelirrojo
    No thread drift there! Thanks Nicholas. Great info. I also heard that she had at least one sister ship, maybe several, but that she might be the last one. I haven't found any photos or info on them though. Although I did find this old photo from 1959, posted by Robert Critchley on Facebook.



    And while we are posting random boat pictures, I was just looking at scans of the lines and construction drawings for Skookum Maru. They make for interesting viewing.







    (the images are linked to larger versions).

    And even more interesting than the drawings of Skookum Maru as-built are some of the variations that were considered and discarded. This one for instance, with a flying bridge:



    Or this rough sketch, which is an almost exact mirror image of the actual layout, with the main berth and dinette to starboard, galley and aft head to port - opposite the way she was built. One wonders why the change?

    - Chris

    Any single boat project will always expand to encompass the set of all possible boat projects.

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  26. #691
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    So... a question for everyone. We have been thinking about buying a little lapstrake utility boat to tow behind Skookum Maru. The thought being that we could use it for exploring, supply runs and so on when we are cruising. It would be used on sheltered water only (Puget Sound, San Juans and Gulf Islands) but the water can get pretty bouncy from big boat wakes around there even on calm days so it would need to be reasonably capable.

    Until now this has just been something that we were considering for sometime in the fuure. We weren't planning to do it now. But this boat has just come up for sale:





    A 16' 1959 Cruisers Inc. Mariner. It seems like exactly the sort of boat that we would want. It's owned by the original family and comes with a period-correct Evinrude 35hp OB. Hasn't been in the water since 2003 but the owner says the hull is in good shape with no cracks or damage to the frames. The price seems fair and if the condition matches the photos we are seriously considering it. It's around 300 miles away in Eastern Washington though, so it might be a few days before we can get out there.

    In the meantime, opinions? Good idea? Bad idea? I've done the research and I think I know what to look for regarding condition of the hull and motor. The owner is planning to launch the boat and let her swell up before we come see it. We'd need to do some work to set it up for towing (mostly adding a dedicated towing eye) but that seems doable as well. Anything else I should be thinking about?
    - Chris

    Any single boat project will always expand to encompass the set of all possible boat projects.

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  27. #692
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Beautiful boat but how well will it tow? Steady? Sway side to side? I've no idea, but don't ever recall seeing a cruising boat like yours towing such a tender.
    I'd think you'd want to beef up the stem where the eye-bolt will be.
    I had a 1959 PennYann that looked exactly like that.
    I was born on a wooden boat that I built myself.
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  28. #693
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Just poking my nose in here, but would a transom planing boat like that be a lot of drag towed displacement speed behind Skookum Maru? That's the type of hull that tries to do me a favor when I'm out rowing, by slowing to pass, which just makes a huge wake.

  29. #694
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    The idea that comes to my mind is going to be your willingness to pull it up on a beach. An old lapstrake runabout, however immaculately kept, isn't going to appreciate repeated beachings.

    Just a thought.
    There's the plan, then there's what actually happens.

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  30. #695
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Quote Originally Posted by Rich Jones View Post
    Beautiful boat but how well will it tow? Steady? Sway side to side? I've no idea, but don't ever recall seeing a cruising boat like yours towing such a tender.
    I'd think you'd want to beef up the stem where the eye-bolt will be.
    I had a 1959 PennYann that looked exactly like that.
    Good questions Rich. I don't really know either, but the idea was prompted by this boat that we saw on our way back from the San Juans last month:



    That seemed like a nice setup so I did some research over on the Trawler Forum where it seems like people do this sort of thing all the time, with appropriate preparation and decent weather. It seems like the biggest concerns are large following seas, which are not a huge issue where we will be boating, and the wake of the towing vessel. But at 7 kts Skookum Maru barely leaves much of a wake at all, so I doubt that will be a problem either.



    As for the towing eye, the typical setup seems to be something like this:



    I'm not sure how that sort of arrangement would work for a lapstrake boat. It's pretty light - under 600 lbs all-up I think - but even so there could be quite a bit of force going through that eye so it would need to be tied in well to something that would be able to take the load. Not sure if that would be the stem or something else though.

    Also it seems like the typical arrangement is to tow with the motor lowered, which helps with tracking and keeps the tender from running up agains the the towing vessel when you slow down. I do see that the tender to the Chris Craft in the first photo has the motor down.

    Quote Originally Posted by rgthom View Post
    Just poking my nose in here, but would a transom planing boat like that be a lot of drag towed displacement speed behind Skookum Maru? That's the type of hull that tries to do me a favor when I'm out rowing, by slowing to pass, which just makes a huge wake.
    I also wonder what towing something this large would do to fuel consumption. Economy doesn't seem to be much of a consideration to the Trawler Forum crowd but then a "large tender" over there seems to mean a 25' center console towed behind a 70' yacht doing 20 kts on a crossing to the Bahamas. We have much more modest ambitions. So I really don't know? Maybe I'll have to reach out to one of the resident professional naval architects for an opinion. MMD are you lurking by any chance?
    - Chris

    Any single boat project will always expand to encompass the set of all possible boat projects.

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  31. #696
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Quote Originally Posted by BBSebens View Post
    The idea that comes to my mind is going to be your willingness to pull it up on a beach. An old lapstrake runabout, however immaculately kept, isn't going to appreciate repeated beachings.

    Just a thought.
    Good point. Seems like that's solvable with a suitable clothesline anchor setup though? It's not like it's going to be light enough for us to actually pull up on a beach in any case. More likely we would drop an anchor a little ways off the beach, run in until it's shallow enough to disembark, and then pull the boat out to deeper water? (I say this glibly having never actually done it, but YouTube makes it looks easy enough).
    - Chris

    Any single boat project will always expand to encompass the set of all possible boat projects.

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  32. #697
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Almost sounds like you would want a tender for this tender, to be able to get to the beach. Might a more beachable boat be more practical, maybe a garvey like this? https://gerrmarine.com/BOSUN_GARVEY.html

    Sorry, small pic:

  33. #698
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Quote Originally Posted by rgthom View Post
    Almost sounds like you would want a tender for this tender, to be able to get to the beach. Might a more beachable boat be more practical, maybe a garvey like this? https://gerrmarine.com/BOSUN_GARVEY.html

    Sorry, small pic:

    No tender for the tender, thanks. There is a level of ridiculousness that I will not stoop to, however low that bar may be. I'd rather roll up my jeans and get a little wet.

    But you are right that something like that garvey would be more practical. The other option we had been looking at was a plywood skiff like that garvey or an LYS or maybe Little Moby:



    More practical and beachable without a doubt, but if practical were the main consideration then we would own a fiberglass trawler yacht instead of Skookum Maru, we would live in a modern townhome instead of a 100 year old craftsman in need of paint and a new roof, and I would have a new F-250 instead of an antique Studebaker pickup. All of which is to say that "practical" isn't really in our DNA.

    I'll note that the first thing anyone said in response to my initial post, before we started in on the undeniable impracticality of the whole enterprise, was "beautiful boat". And I'm entirely capable of ignoring the "but" after Rich's statement of admiration there. Beautiful boat is enough of a reason for me.
    - Chris

    Any single boat project will always expand to encompass the set of all possible boat projects.

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  34. #699
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    It will tow fine... if the towing eye is down low, and the outboard is partially lowered, and it is located on the back side of the second wake wave.
    The outboard will need a restraining strap, the towing eye will need some solid, boatshop engineering, and you will need a tow bridle from the stern of the big boat, and then at least 100’ of towline.
    Then, just plan on putting the small boat athwartships behind the swimstep for maneuvering in and out of the slip.
    Having a fast capable boat line this will vastly increase your range and enjoyment of any given anchorage.

  35. #700
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Schweiss View Post
    It will tow fine... if the towing eye is down low, and the outboard is partially lowered, and it is located on the back side of the second wake wave.
    The outboard will need a restraining strap, the towing eye will need some solid, boatshop engineering, and you will need a tow bridle from the stern of the big boat, and then at least 100’ of towline.
    Then, just plan on putting the small boat athwartships behind the swimstep for maneuvering in and out of the slip.
    Having a fast capable boat line this will vastly increase your range and enjoyment of any given anchorage.
    Thanks Paul. That assessment matches what I was thinking as well.
    - Chris

    Any single boat project will always expand to encompass the set of all possible boat projects.

    Life is short. Go boating now!

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