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Thread: Skookum Maru

  1. #316
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    We just returned from a week's circle of the San Juans and relocated Kingfisher to her new slip at Squalicum Harbor. Like your new slip, it's closer to home. We'll miss being your neighbor up there in Blaine, but look forward to running into you out on the salt chuck. I'm happy to hear that you'll be closer to your boat. In my sailing days I lived aboard my Bristol Channel Cutter at the Ballard Mill Marina. I loved being just inside the locks! It's a wonderful location that I visit with fond memories every time I'm in Ballard. It's a great place for sailing and rowing the dinghy, too. Go, Dash, go!
    --​Anson, M/V Kingfisher

    Be kind whenever possible. It is always possible. ~The Dalai Lama

  2. #317
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Uh oh, is Chris now going to fall in with that CYA gang? Where cruising means making an appearance at a nearby wooden boat show or festival, or heading to some destination that doesn't require leaving Puget Sound? They even have a Rear Commodore.

    The previous owner (to us) was active in CYA. We let the membership lapse, but the full-dress flags are still in a locker on the boat, ready to go. (ETA: and a CYA burgee.) It would up the ante of Chris's transom lettering decision; we might be talking of gold leaf as a necessity. And the ship's whistle will need tuning.
    Last edited by _QB_; 08-10-2019 at 12:06 AM.

  3. #318
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Quote Originally Posted by Sabre View Post
    We just returned from a week's circle of the San Juans and relocated Kingfisher to her new slip at Squalicum Harbor. Like your new slip, it's closer to home. We'll miss being your neighbor up there in Blaine, but look forward to running into you out on the salt chuck. I'm happy to hear that you'll be closer to your boat. In my sailing days I lived aboard my Bristol Channel Cutter at the Ballard Mill Marina. I loved being just inside the locks! It's a wonderful location that I visit with fond memories every time I'm in Ballard. It's a great place for sailing and rowing the dinghy, too. Go, Dash, go!
    Cheers Anson. We will just have to meet up on the water when the opportunity presents itself. As I'm sure it will!

    Quote Originally Posted by _QB_ View Post
    Uh oh, is Chris now going to fall in with that CYA gang? Where cruising means making an appearance at a nearby wooden boat show or festival, or heading to some destination that doesn't require leaving Puget Sound? They even have a Rear Commodore.

    The previous owner (to us) was active in CYA. We let the membership lapse, but the full-dress flags are still in a locker on the boat, ready to go. (ETA: and a CYA burgee.) It would up the ante of Chris's transom lettering decision; we might be talking of gold leaf as a necessity. And the ship's whistle will need tuning.
    Hey now, some of my best friends are in the CYA, including a past commodore! We were in the CYA ourselves briefly with Temptation It's fun but I'm not much of a group joiner. I find that the inevitable politics and group dysfunction take away much of the pleasure in cruising. Still we will certainly be lobbied to join so it might happen.

    But time for an update on our current activities. On Friday we got off to our usual Late Start™ (pat. pending). By the time we got to Blaine, took Skookum Maru out of the boathouse, loaded provisions aboard and cast off it was after 1700 hours. But finally we headed out under a clear sky and light wind. A lovely evening for a cruise.



    We were planning to head for Eagle Harbor on Cypress Island, to the south east of Orcas Island - about four hours away. But with sunset at 2037 hours we would be arriving after dark. So a couple of hours into our voyage, with the sun closing in on the horizon and Matia and Sucia Islands beckoning a short distance to the south west, we decided to head for those closer harbors instead.



    An hour later we were tied to the public dock in Rolfe Cove on Matia Island just in time to catch a glorious golden-pink sunset.





    Landing at the Matia dock was... interesting. There was little current or wind as we entered the cove from the west but as soon as we passed the small islet at the entrance we were caught by a strong current coming in from the north, setting us off the south side of the dock. "No problem," I figured "we'll just head for the north side and let the current set us down on the dock." only to find that the current was setting just as strongly off the dock on the north side as well. It's a small cove and the current must swirl around quite a bit. But with the assistance of a family of kayakers having dinner on the dock we made it in with little trouble.

    We spent the next day on Matia enjoying the quiet. It's a small island with one tiny anchorage just big enough for a couple of boats so it's not crowded. Dash and I took the dinghy for a row...



    ...and launched driftwood boats off of the beach.



    In the evening Tory and I taught Dash to play backgammon (after looking up the rules since neither of us had played in at least twenty years) and then we crawled into our bunks tired and happy.

  4. #319
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Today we cruised from Matia Island to Friday Harbor, needing to replenish our food and water (which I had decided not to top off in Blaine in the interest of time - probably a mistake as we ran out half way through our stay on Matia. Fortunately we had a few gallons of bottled water aboard). We were also tempted by the opportunity for laundry and showers although we had only been cruising for two days. City habits die hard.

    We headed for San Juan Channel under cloudy skies and passing showers.



    But the trip passed without event and a couple of hours later we joined the traffic headed into the Friday Harbor marina...



    ...where we have enjoyed dinner, ice cream, laundry and other amenities. A good day and now the bunk is calling me again. Further reports to come later.

  5. #320
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    There’s a good start to a week on the boat!
    -Jim

    Sucker for a pretty face.
    1934 27' Blanchard Cuiser ~ Amazon, Ex. Emalu
    19'6" Caledonia Yawl ~ Sparrow

    Getting into trouble one board at a time.

  6. #321
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Summer cruise of Skookum Maru continued.


    After two nights at Matia Island we headed south for Friday Harbor, where Tory and I have celebrated our wedding anniversary for the past few years. An uneventful (and apparently unphotographed) voyage down San Juan channel brought us into the busy harbor. The mass of ferries, seaplanes, whale watching boats, big cruisers, small craft and other vessels of every size and type made a huge change from the quiet of tiny Rolfe Cove. But we were soon moored on G dock with convenient access to all the amenities of the big city. Meaning showers! Hardy sail-and-oar types may scoff as us soft power boaters (as long as they do so from well down wind), but after three days of sponge baths a good dose of hot water was a welcome refreshment.


    As always we enjoyed our stay in Friday Harbor. We browsed the shops, bought a few books and had an anniversary dinner at a good restaurant overlooking the marina. In the evening we played a few hands of Uno (at which Dash crushed his parents four hands to zero. I say it was beginner’s luck...) and then read Treasure Island to Dash at bedtime. The adventures of young Jim Hawkins, Long John Silver, Ben Gunn and the crew of the Hispaniola are no less exciting now than they were when I was a kid. Truly one of the great stories.


    The only downside to this part of the trip was an onslaught of yellow jackets that evaded all attempts to keep them out. It was a problem for the entire marina. Just about every boat displayed a wasp trap and when we went looking for one we found that they were sold out everywhere. The hardware store said they had received a shipment of seventy traps the week before and they were all gone. We have screens on the windows, which helped a bit, but eventually they crawled through the gaps between the cabin side and the sliding doors, forcing us to stuff paper towels in the cracks and exit through the cockpit instead. So in the end we were happy to say goodbye to Friday Harbor as we sailed away on Tuesday, carrying with us a small crew of yellow jackets who had avoided all attempts at eviction. But perhaps in compensation, we enjoyed a lovely view of the schooner Spike Africa as we headed out.





    From Friday Harbor we had planned to head north across Boundary Pass for Canadian customs in Bedwell Harbor and on to the lower Gulf Islands. But in the end we elected to stay closer to home and spent the next couple of nights in Reid Harbor on Stuart Island. This is one of our favorite anchorages. Many people prefer Prevost Harbor on the other side of the island and we will probably give it a try next time, but we have found a nice spot near the northern shore of Reid, at a small bight east of the public dock, that is rarely taken. And so it was this time as well.





    The next day we all walked out to the lighthouse at Turn Point. Which I had done before but not in twenty years or so. I recalled it as being a somewhat easy hike and said as much to the crew. Even after seeing the black diamond “difficult trail” signs at the start I remained confident of a quick and painless trek. But my optimism was as mistaken as my memory, as the trail started out with a thigh-straining uphill scramble, continued down a long and narrow switchback of wooden steps, and then proceeded on a gravel road up and over not one but two mountain ridges. However the crew bore the hardship with only the slightest whiff of mutiny and three uphill and downhill miles later we were enjoying the beautiful (and again unphotographed) view across Haro Strait to Canada. We toured the restored lightkeepers house and the museum at the point, ate our lunch in the sun at a picnic table with an incomparable view, and then trudged the long way back to the dinghy and the row to Skookum Maru for dinner, more Treasure Island, and bed. A long day but worth the effort although our no-longer-young dog, Addison, fell asleep in the dinghy on the row home and slept in very late the next morning.


    (contd.)

  7. #322
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    From Stuart Island we debated our next destination. Tory wanted to visit Victoria, B.C. I was ambivalent. Dash was trepidatious about customs and strange countries. But we had moorage reservations for two nights in front of the Empress Hotel and it seemed a shame to waste them so on Thursday we raised the anchor and motored out of Reid Harbor and down Haro Strait for Victoria. The first few hours went smoothly enough. Light fog in the Strait lifted early and we cruised down the boundary line between the United States and Canada under a clear sky with light wind and calm water.





    This happy state of being lasted right until we reached Discovery Island and turned west into the Strait of Juan de Fuca for the final leg to Victoria. At which point we found ourselves battling a flood current of over six knots. Our progress slowed to less than a knot and for the next thirty minutes we stared at the Discovery Island lighthouse, seemingly motionless on our starboard beam, while we debated our options. We were still ten miles or so from Victoria and six hours from the tide change so it was going to be a long, long afternoon and evening to get there at our current rate. But worse, the wind was picking up and a gale watch was forecast starting at 1800.


    The prospect of night falling, a gale building in the Strait, and miles still to go for a safe harbor made me start thinking of other destinations. We could make it to Port Angeles, Port Townsend or even back to Friday Harbor sooner than Victoria. But before we gave up we decided to try tacking out further into the Strait in search of a more favorable (or at least less-unfavorable) current. Finally a couple of miles away from shore we saw our speed pick up to three knots over ground and we slowly battled our way westward as the wind increased and the waves built. By 1600 we were passing south of Trial Island, heading into three foot seas and 20+ knots of wind with higher gusts. Some members of the crew succumbed to the motion sickness. The dog hid in the forward berth. But Skookum Maru shrugged off the seas and the current and kept pressing on.


    By the time we made Brotchie Point and the turn for the Victoria breakwater we were heading into four foot waves with wind gusts approaching 30 knots. Nothing that our sturdy boat couldn’t handle, but more than enough for the crew. The last twenty minutes, as we turned north and had the seas on our port beam, were plenty rough enough for us pleasure boaters although I’m sure a commercial mariner would have wondered what the fuss was all about. However soon enough we were past the breakwater, into calm water and searching for the customs dock. Clearing customs was a trivial matter of a brief phone call with a brusque-sounding official and soon we were docked at Causeway Marina in the very heart of Victoria’s inner harbor and the shadow of the Empress Hotel.








    Victoria is enjoyable to visit but for me it seems less like a real city than a sort of pseudo-colonial theme park. Elegant stone buildings compete with shop after shop hawking Canada-kitsch. Monuments to British explorers stand over First Nations artists exhibiting their work along the quay while jugglers and other performers entertain the crowds a few yards away. It’s not an entirely happy combination. We ate a couple of decent but unmemorable meals, visited the B.C. Maritime Museum and generally saw the sights for two days. We all had fun there but by the time we slipped out of the harbor on a grey Saturday morning I think we were all happy to be beading home.


    (contd.)

  8. #323
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    The last segment of our journey home took us first across the Strait of Juan de Fuca from Victoria to Port Townsend. After our somewhat rocky passage to Victoria I spent some time pondering the various combinations of time, tide, current and weather to determine the best chance of a smooth passage. We could either leave in the morning and travel against the ebb or later in the day to catch the flood. But winds in the Strait tend to pick up later in the day so although the forecast was for light winds I was reluctant to chance it. In the end we chose to risk the tide over the wind and left early. Which meant a long, seven-hour crossing to Port Townsend but the Strait was calm for the entire trip and we were all happy to be cruising unruffled waters.


    That placid state lasted right up to the point about two hours out when I realized that the customs office in Port Townsend is not regularly staffed and that our only realistic option for clearing customs lay a good four or five hours back the other way in Port Angeles. Hoping for, but not really expecting, some other option I called the Port Angeles customs office. The officer there was polite but told me that no, there was no way to clear customs in Port Townsend. However there was an app we could use to clear customs without visiting an entry port.


    An app! Could it be that in the middle of the Strait of Juan de Fuca I could download a mobile app, enter in all of our passport information, and clear customs without touching land? It seemed impossible but ultimately that’s what we did. I handed over the helm to Tory, downloaded the app (two bars of cell signal got the job done), scanned all of our passports, submitted them to Customs and Border Protection and watched the “pending review” icon animate while waiting to be allowed to go home. And after a few minutes we received the notice “You and your reporting group are now cleared to enter the U.S. Enjoy your stay.” Phew. We were not doomed to wander no-man’s land (water?) for the rest of our days. Giving thanks to modern technology we made our way to Port Townsend Boat Haven marina and our slip for the night.


    The next morning we again set out early for the final passage down Puget Sound, through the Ballard Locks and our new home on Salmon Bay. The run down the Sound was uneventful. The Locks were stacked up three tiers deep with the Sunday crowd heading home but at least we got to see the lovely Circe heading out while we were waiting.





    A Ben Seaborn design, Circe is a rare beauty and one of the grand old ladies of the Seattle waterfront. Always a treat to see her out.


    Our new home at Stimson Marina is right inside the Locks so once we finally made it through we were quickly tied up.





    And so ended our first long-ish cruise aboard Skookum Maru. A wonderful trip and if there were a few moments of wind, waves and adversity they were only enough to make us feel like we had gone somewhere and done something out of the usual vein. Which is the best sort of vacation.

  9. #324
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Well done all around. Crossing the big strait is not to be taken lightly, but I hope now the crew has confidence the boat will take it in stride; which should ease their anxiety, if not the physical discomfort. And now that you have the border crossing thing well in hand, I hope to see you up here often!

    And I have to say she looks right at home there in that Stimson slip.

    So, the Rolls 8D's seemed to survive their discharge event all right?

    --Paul

  10. #325
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Quite the adventure! Sorry to hear you are gong from Blaine, but very understandable.



    Quote Originally Posted by Sabre View Post
    We just returned from a week's circle of the San Juans and relocated Kingfisher to her new slip at Squalicum Harbor. Like your new slip, it's closer to home.
    I live in Lynden and work in Bellingham. If you ever need an extra hand, I'm happy to help!
    There's the plan, then there's what actually happens.

    Ben Sebens, RN

    15' Welsford Navigator Inconceivable
    16' W. Simmons Mattinicus double ender ​Matty

  11. #326
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Nice trip Chris.
    -Jim

    Sucker for a pretty face.
    1934 27' Blanchard Cuiser ~ Amazon, Ex. Emalu
    19'6" Caledonia Yawl ~ Sparrow

    Getting into trouble one board at a time.

  12. #327
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Quote Originally Posted by _QB_ View Post
    Well done all around. Crossing the big strait is not to be taken lightly, but I hope now the crew has confidence the boat will take it in stride; which should ease their anxiety, if not the physical discomfort. And now that you have the border crossing thing well in hand, I hope to see you up here often!

    And I have to say she looks right at home there in that Stimson slip.

    So, the Rolls 8D's seemed to survive their discharge event all right?

    --Paul
    Thanks Paul. I don't think the mood ever approached anxiety (well, perhaps Dash's feelings toward passports, customs and Canada in general qualify, but I think he got over it ) but there were some moments of severe discomfort that I want to avoid in the future for the happiness of everyone aboard. I have never been susceptible to motion sickness myself (not that it couldn't happen!) so I need to work on my awareness of how rough conditions affect other people. I'm trying.

    As for the house bank... well that's a good question. I would say that everything went well in the electrical department except for one incident. When we came back from the Turn Point trek on Stuart Island I checked the battery charge level and was a bit shocked to see it down below 80% after around a day and a half on the hook. It had not gone that low in any of our previous outings, including Matia where we ran on the batteries for the same amount of time. I would not have been over concerned, except that I have not yet gotten around to replacing the dead starter battery. I had thought of doing it before this trip but it will be so much easier to do with Skookum Maru down here that I decided to put it off. So we would be depending on the house bank to start the engine and I had no idea how low we could draw the batteries down and still crank over the motor. We did have a charged jump pack that I was confident would start the engine even if the primary bank ran too low but even so it was not a comfortable feeling. In the end the charge level went down to 73% but the engine cranked over with no issues at all when we fired up to leave the next morning.

    So my next task is to determine why the solar panels did not keep up with our electrical usage, which should not have been unsual or excessive. We had clear days for the entire stay in Reid Harbor so cloud cover was not a factor. At the moment I am not thinking it's a battery problem. They take a change just fine and seem to hold it. We had no issues on Matia. So it's a mystery.



    Quote Originally Posted by BBSebens View Post
    Quite the adventure! Sorry to hear you are gong from Blaine, but very understandable.





    I live in Lynden and work in Bellingham. If you ever need an extra hand, I'm happy to help!
    Well, since we own the boathouse in Blaine we now have two slips and two boats so I'm scheming.... More on that subject soon.

    Quote Originally Posted by jsjpd1 View Post
    Nice trip Chris.
    Thanks Jim

  13. #328
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Well - the forum ate a long post. I'll try to redo it (but it'll be shorter)...

    Thanks for the trip pics & description!

    Batteries: If a jump pack will start the engine, a couple of 8Ds @ 40% will - though I'm not sure a jump pack will crank over a jimmie for long.

    Slips: So - gonna put a sailboat in one? Petrel? A northern boat & a southern boat? Inquiring minds...

    Seasickness - something I'm very familiar with - even though I've been on boats since about age 3 (& that was a long, long time ago!). Bonine. Take some the night before & keep it up for a 3 day trip. If a longer, trip you can start tapering off. Dramamine does not work well for me + it makes me really groggy - Bonine doesn't.
    "If it ain't broke, you're not trying." - Red Green

  14. #329
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Quote Originally Posted by Garret View Post
    Well - the forum ate a long post. I'll try to redo it (but it'll be shorter)...

    Thanks for the trip pics & description!

    Batteries: If a jump pack will start the engine, a couple of 8Ds @ 40% will - though I'm not sure a jump pack will crank over a jimmie for long.

    Slips: So - gonna put a sailboat in one? Petrel? A northern boat & a southern boat? Inquiring minds...

    Seasickness - something I'm very familiar with - even though I've been on boats since about age 3 (& that was a long, long time ago!). Bonine. Take some the night before & keep it up for a 3 day trip. If a longer, trip you can start tapering off. Dramamine does not work well for me + it makes me really groggy - Bonine doesn't.
    Ugh - I'm really getting frustrated by the forum stability issues. Not to appear ungrateful since it's a free resource and all, but I have to wonder how much better the site would be if the Bilge were moved off to a separate server instance... But anyway, thanks Garret. Some thoughts:

    1. Jump pack... well, it's a really big jump pack (4000 amps) and a really small Jimmy. I doubt it would crank it over for five minutes at below-zero temps like you might get out there in the frozen hills of Vermont but for a summer day in the PNW I expect it would do well enough. I tested it starting the motor with just the (very, very dead) starting bank and it cranked right over and fired up first time. But I expect that you are right. One 4D would start the 3-71 easily. Probably could do it with a group 31 starting battery for that matter. So a couple of 8Ds even at a fairly low charge would probably work fine. Still though it's not the thing you want to have to find out while anchored out, even if insurance would cover the Vessel Assist call.

    2. Slips... For now we are thinking of putting Petrel up in Blaine. While the sane thing to do is to find her a new home I have this vision of working on her with Dash over the next few years. He can learn about craftsmanship, seamanship, and life on the water and I can get some quality time with him at the same time. Tory is onboard with that plan as well. I need to do a few things to get her ready to go up there though. More on that soon over in the Petrel thread.

    3. Bonine... Thanks! That's a great recommendation since Tory's complaint about Dramamine is that it makes her groggy as well. I'll relay the info about Bonine to her and maybe it will be the cure.

  15. #330
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    I had a time in No Name Harbor (Key Biscayne FL) where the fan belt was loose & the batteries were just about dead. It was a charter & we had to have it back that day. A boat near me had a nice guy aboard & he let me use one of his batteries. Thing was, it was a 4D - accessed through the cockpit lazarrete. Standing on the hull with my feet next to the battery put my head even with the seat. Lifting that sucker up over my head, moving it to my boat, then moving it back was really fun.

    All this was a long way of saying "jump starting a boat is not fun"...

    ETA: Dramamine is awful for me - not only does it make me groggy, it doesn't work well. Bonine is much better - but it's critical to start it at least 6 hours (if not 12) before the trip & to keep taking it. Some people also have good luck with the pressure point wrist bands (though they never worked for me) & also the behind the ear patches. I've just stuck with Bonine because it works for me.
    "If it ain't broke, you're not trying." - Red Green

  16. #331
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    Great to see you and yours are enjoying the boat Chris!

    I'm on a few sites that have gone with other site hosting software. I don't profess to know anything about what makes online servers and hosting sites work, but vbulletin seems to get hit hard!
    Last edited by DeniseO30; 08-23-2019 at 10:25 AM.
    Denise, Bristol PA, Oday30, Anchor Yacht Club, On tidal Delaware River. my current project; http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthre...0-Ducker-Resto

  17. #332
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    For seasickness get a Dr prescription for Scopace (not scopalamine) it is a pill, not a patch. It now has to be from a Compunding Pharmacy as it is no longer made. I have used it for years fishing on my 24' fish boat out of Bodega Bay, Ca. It will not make you drowsy at all. Great stuff, but it reqires a prescription to a compounding pharmacy - it is a pill you take 1 hour before hitting the water.

  18. #333
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Looks like a great trip! A little unexpected adventure always makes the trips memorable, as you pointed out. Adventures are usually wet, windy, and scary until they're over, but the upside is that any weather or wind less than you've already experienced will seem manageable. You (and the family) will be like "we've been in worse than this!" The photo of Skookum Maru anchored is great, such a beautiful boat.

    Seasickness (or motion sickness in general) is a strange thing. I go to sea for a living and some of my coworkers get seasick in heavy weather. They always try to blame it on the cook! most motions don't affect me but long, slow rolls make me feel slightly ill. The kind of rolls you get beam to a swell when it is otherwise calm out. Looking at the horizon and getting fresh air always seems to help.

  19. #334
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    FWIW Chris, Snoose's 3-71 has been started with one 4D for longer than I have owned her.

  20. #335
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    Quote Originally Posted by cstevens View Post
    So my next task is to determine why the solar panels did not keep up with our electrical usage, which should not have been unsual or excessive. We had clear days for the entire stay in Reid Harbor so cloud cover was not a factor. At the moment I am not thinking it's a battery problem. They take a change just fine and seem to hold it. We had no issues on Matia. So it's a mystery.
    First, check that the solar breaker (on the panel below the helm settee) hasn't been tripped. Then check the inline fuse for the solar controller (under the helm settee cushion). Could be something deeper, but those are easy.

    I got in the habit of checking solar output every day. In the evening, cycle through the solar monitor panel readings to see if the recorded max voltage, max current, and amp-hours show anything unusual; then reset all to zero for the next day. (The user interface to that thing isn't super-intuitive. Same for the TriMetric battery monitor. Manuals are in the filebox, or online.)

    --Paul

  21. #336
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    I thought Petrel was moving on?

    Sent from my CPH1851 using Tapatalk

  22. #337
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Quote Originally Posted by Garret View Post
    I had a time in No Name Harbor (Key Biscayne FL) where the fan belt was loose & the batteries were just about dead. It was a charter & we had to have it back that day. A boat near me had a nice guy aboard & he let me use one of his batteries. Thing was, it was a 4D - accessed through the cockpit lazarrete. Standing on the hull with my feet next to the battery put my head even with the seat. Lifting that sucker up over my head, moving it to my boat, then moving it back was really fun.

    All this was a long way of saying "jump starting a boat is not fun"...

    ETA: Dramamine is awful for me - not only does it make me groggy, it doesn't work well. Bonine is much better - but it's critical to start it at least 6 hours (if not 12) before the trip & to keep taking it. Some people also have good luck with the pressure point wrist bands (though they never worked for me) & also the behind the ear patches. I've just stuck with Bonine because it works for me.
    Ugh - yeah, wrestling with batteries is no fun at all. That's the main reason I've put off replacing the starting battery so long.

    Quote Originally Posted by DeniseO30 View Post
    Great to see you and yours are enjoying the boat Chris!

    I'm on a few sites that have gone with other site hosting software. I don't profess to know anything about what makes online servers and hosting sites work, but vbulletin seems to get hit hard!
    Thanks Denise! The site issues could be a lot of things. I'm working on a website performance and load testing project for a local transit agency right now. It's interesting and complex with all the interactions between the software and hardware and networking aspects. Maybe not fun exactly, but certainly an engaging challenge.

    Quote Originally Posted by Powerwagon View Post
    Looks like a great trip! A little unexpected adventure always makes the trips memorable, as you pointed out. Adventures are usually wet, windy, and scary until they're over, but the upside is that any weather or wind less than you've already experienced will seem manageable. You (and the family) will be like "we've been in worse than this!" The photo of Skookum Maru anchored is great, such a beautiful boat.

    Seasickness (or motion sickness in general) is a strange thing. I go to sea for a living and some of my coworkers get seasick in heavy weather. They always try to blame it on the cook! most motions don't affect me but long, slow rolls make me feel slightly ill. The kind of rolls you get beam to a swell when it is otherwise calm out. Looking at the horizon and getting fresh air always seems to help.
    Ha! I think if I blame it on the cook aboard Skookum Maru I might find myself marooned on a desert island Of which there is no shortage in these parts. I have never been seasick but almost all of my experience has been inshore. I don't know how I would do in a real ocean swell. But Skookum Maru has been to Cabo, Mexico and Alaska so perhaps we will retrace those voyages some day and I'll have a chance to find out.

    Quote Originally Posted by ron ll View Post
    FWIW Chris, Snoose's 3-71 has been started with one 4D for longer than I have owned her.
    Interesting. I have thought of replacing the 8D starting battery in Skookum Maru with a 4D. I have a group 31 battery in Petrel and it starts the 3-53 just fine. I imagine that a 4D would be plenty for the 3-71. Easier to carry too. Hm.

    Quote Originally Posted by _QB_ View Post
    First, check that the solar breaker (on the panel below the helm settee) hasn't been tripped. Then check the inline fuse for the solar controller (under the helm settee cushion). Could be something deeper, but those are easy.

    I got in the habit of checking solar output every day. In the evening, cycle through the solar monitor panel readings to see if the recorded max voltage, max current, and amp-hours show anything unusual; then reset all to zero for the next day. (The user interface to that thing isn't super-intuitive. Same for the TriMetric battery monitor. Manuals are in the filebox, or online.)

    --Paul
    Thanks Paul. Good info. I did review the documentation on the monitor panel but found it nearly unreadable so I stuffed it back in the folder for another day. I'll have to make another attempt at it.

    Quote Originally Posted by Phil Y View Post
    I thought Petrel was moving on?

    Sent from my CPH1851 using Tapatalk
    Well, no. Details on the Petrel thread. I know that the reasonable and sane thing to do is to pass her on but it turns out that I'm just not ready to do that.

  23. #338
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Interesting. I have thought of replacing the 8D starting battery in Skookum Maru with a 4D. I have a group 31 battery in Petrel and it starts the 3-53 just fine. I imagine that a 4D would be plenty for the 3-71. Easier to carry too. Hm.
    Before you do anything drastic, I better double check that and I can’t do that until next week. It is ONLY connected to the starter, and a couple of times last winter when my block heater was out I had to switch the big red switch to “all” to start it, but I wouldn’t want to do that often. I’ve replaced that battery once a few years ago but I’m pretty sure it is a Dyno 4D.
    The PO used ether in the winter as he had no access to shore power for a heater. I know ether is controversial, but I would prefer not to use it.

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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Quote Originally Posted by ron ll View Post
    Before you do anything drastic, I better double check that and I can’t do that until next week. It is ONLY connected to the starter, and a couple of times last winter when my block heater was out I had to switch the big red switch to “all” to start it, but I wouldn’t want to do that often. I’ve replaced that battery once a few years ago but I’m pretty sure it is a Dyno 4D.
    The PO used ether in the winter as he had no access to shore power for a heater. I know ether is controversial, but I would prefer not to use it.
    Thanks Ron. No rush. And Skookum Maru starts on ether when cold anyway due to her low compression setup and always has as far as I know, so that's not a concern. For the 20 or 30 cold starts she might see in a year I don't imagine it's a problem.

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    How much solar wattage you have on her Chris?

    Also I meant to ask you how are things working out with the diesel stove?

    Damn, I wish I could fly out there for the WB festival, but it's just not in the numbers
    Denise, Bristol PA, Oday30, Anchor Yacht Club, On tidal Delaware River. my current project; http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthre...0-Ducker-Resto

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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Quote Originally Posted by cstevens View Post
    Thanks Ron. No rush. And Skookum Maru starts on ether when cold anyway due to her low compression setup and always has as far as I know, so that's not a concern. For the 20 or 30 cold starts she might see in a year I don't imagine it's a problem.
    And I know we’ve talked about the cold start routine before, but I’m always amazed how well it works.

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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    I wish I had known you needed to pull an 8D before you left! I am always up for a heavy challenge!

    The trip looked fun. Running in big seas is exciting, at least to me.

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    Chris! (and everybody else that have, like, love Detroit diesels) if I were in the position that I owned a DD and I could afford to pay to have DD worked on this guy is pretty cool, Drives his DD powered bus all around the country to service the monsters! https://www.youtube.com/user/avonpicturethis
    Last edited by DeniseO30; 08-24-2019 at 04:35 PM.
    Denise, Bristol PA, Oday30, Anchor Yacht Club, On tidal Delaware River. my current project; http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthre...0-Ducker-Resto

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    Here's one where he gets twin DDs running in an old boat
    https://youtu.be/_3qR0AYkfZA
    Denise, Bristol PA, Oday30, Anchor Yacht Club, On tidal Delaware River. my current project; http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthre...0-Ducker-Resto

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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Quote Originally Posted by ron ll View Post
    And I know we’ve talked about the cold start routine before, but I’m always amazed how well it works.
    Yep. I do still like the idea of a block heater as we have discussed in the past as well. Something for the winter list perhaps.

    Quote Originally Posted by SeanM26 View Post
    I wish I had known you needed to pull an 8D before you left! I am always up for a heavy challenge!

    The trip looked fun. Running in big seas is exciting, at least to me.
    Thanks Sean. Way easier to lug batteries on and off the boat from the dock down here though, as it's at deck level. No need to heft them up from a floating dock. The trip was fun and I think big seas are well enough in their way for myself but not something I want to subject anyone else to. If cruising stops being fun for the family I'll be awfully lonely out there!

    Quote Originally Posted by DeniseO30 View Post
    Chris! (and everybody else that have, like, love Detroit diesels) if I were in the position that I owned a DD and I could afford to pay to have DD worked on this guy is pretty cool, Drives his DD powered bus all around the country to service the monsters! https://www.youtube.com/user/avonpicturethis
    Quote Originally Posted by DeniseO30 View Post
    Here's one where he gets twin DDs running in an old boat
    https://youtu.be/_3qR0AYkfZA
    Thanks Denise. I agree - that's pretty cool.

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    Quote Originally Posted by DeniseO30 View Post
    How much solar wattage you have on her Chris?

    Also I meant to ask you how are things working out with the diesel stove?

    Damn, I wish I could fly out there for the WB festival, but it's just not in the numbers

    Oops - missed this one. I think around 500 watts? Paul might correct me but I think it's three 200 watt panels but one is damaged and not producing the full output. In the past it's been enough to keep the batteries charged at anchor. The diesel stove has been working great except that it tends to run hot and melt the thermal shutoff fuse. It happened again on this trip. Fortunately we never really needed it as it was plenty warm enough the entire time, but I do need to sort it out. I think the issue might be that the chimney is a bit too short so I end up using the fan for draft but it's easy to get the stove too hot with forced air. That's my theory at the moment at least. Another thing for the fall/winter maintenance list.

  32. #347
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    "The trip was fun and I think big seas are well enough in their way for myself but not something I want to subject anyone else to. If cruising stops being fun for the family I'll be awfully lonely out there! "

    Once you get a bit further north you are either hitting into or running with swells, as the breeze usually runs up or down the channels. When I'm attempting to cross in wind on Accolade (20-25 kts) I need to point higher than 45 and run carefully in a 6-10' sea, so as not to spill the drinks. / Jim

  33. #348
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Quote Originally Posted by chas View Post
    "The trip was fun and I think big seas are well enough in their way for myself but not something I want to subject anyone else to. If cruising stops being fun for the family I'll be awfully lonely out there! "

    Once you get a bit further north you are either hitting into or running with swells, as the breeze usually runs up or down the channels. When I'm attempting to cross in wind on Accolade (20-25 kts) I need to point higher than 45 and run carefully in a 6-10' sea, so as not to spill the drinks. / Jim
    Oh - yes, of course. I do expect that some day we will want to venture into places where we will have to accept some bouncing around as part of the trip. Tory wants to go to Princess Louisa. I'd like to go to Desolation Sound and further north - eventually perhaps to Alaska. But we will work up to it.

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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Quote Originally Posted by cstevens View Post
    I'd like to go to Desolation Sound ...
    You could get to Princess Louisa in two (long) days but while you're there, gotta do Bute Inlet. It's pretty spectacular. Even better than Knight, I think ... alas, I discovered it is easy to exceed 3 gph when kicking up the speed to go longer distances. Like, 8 ? For a thirty foot boat ? At canadian fuel prices ?
    Attached Images Attached Images

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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Quote Originally Posted by cstevens View Post
    Oops - missed this one. I think around 500 watts? Paul might correct me but I think it's three 200 watt panels but one is damaged and not producing the full output. In the past it's been enough to keep the batteries charged at anchor.
    Four 100 W flexible panels, so rated 400 W total. And yes one is cracked and not working very well. (The vendor says they would be happy to replace it, but they aren't available anymore. Too bad, they are thin and light and don't need a mounting frame... a bit fragile though.)

    I've seen 25A from the full array in direct sun, which would be 300 watts at 12V. I had no problem getting 50 amp-hours a day from them in the summer, even with an overcast. But solar cells' efficiency degrades with age.

    --Paul

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