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Thread: Skookum Maru

  1. #1506
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    As promised, the Strait was as calm as the proverbial millpond. Are millponds always this calm? Can't be very useful for powering the mill then can it? But that's a subject for later investigation. It was a beautiful day on the water.





    We had to traverse more tide rips as we neared Cattle Pass at the southern end of San Juan Channel but they were nowhere near as bad as the ones off Pt. No Point.



    The flood tide swept us through Cattle Pass and up the channel at a breathtaking 12 knots and we were tied up in Friday Harbor before 3:45 pm in land time.



    We are here for our annual wedding anniversary dinner tonight, which we have had in Friday Harbor for seven or eight years now, and then will be heading out to anchor for a few days in the other islands. More to come.
    - Chris

    Any single boat project will always expand to encompass the set of all possible boat projects.

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  2. #1507
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Must have been a long time behind the helm if you've finally solved the mill pond riddle.
    Quote Originally Posted by James McMullen View Post
    Yeadon is right, of course.

  3. #1508
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Yeah, I lost my mast in that “mill pond” a couple years ago.

    Looks like a happy trip Chris. Congratulations on the anniversary.

  4. #1509
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Great pics & story - thanks Chris! You do realize mill ponds work on gravity, not waves, right?
    "If it ain't broke, you're not trying." - Red Green

  5. #1510
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Quote Originally Posted by Yeadon View Post
    Must have been a long time behind the helm if you've finally solved the mill pond riddle.
    It was a long-ish day although not the longest I've done. But I do sometimes think that autopilot is a nice invention and maybe we should have one.

    Quote Originally Posted by ron ll View Post
    Yeah, I lost my mast in that “mill pond” a couple years ago.

    Looks like a happy trip Chris. Congratulations on the anniversary.
    Thanks Ron. I will say that your encounter with the Pt. Wilson tide rip was very much on my mind when we were looking at the weather. I've always had good luck with crossing the Strait. It has never been really rough and most of the time we've had flat calm. But the stories of the bad crossings keep me focused on the wind and the tide before we set out for sure.

    Quote Originally Posted by Garret View Post
    Great pics & story - thanks Chris! You do realize mill ponds work on gravity, not waves, right?
    Well true but so does a class five whitewater rapids and I wouldn't want to take Skookum Maru down one. But I take your point. The millpond itself is just a reservoir. The battery if you will. While the millstream is, er, well, the "current" in this analogy. Sorry-not-sorry!

    Speaking of batteries and current, I am working on a bit of an experiment. When we added the new refrigerator we opted to get one without a freezer. I've never had a marine refrigerator-freezer that worked at all. They are too small, won't keep ice cream frozen and they are constantly icing up. Instead we decided to use a Dometic portable 12v cooler as a dedicated freezer. More room and better temperature control, plus it could live in the cockpit.

    That setup is working great so far. The freezer is generally staying below 0F so we have no concerns with the frozen food. The refrigerator has more space and contains all of our perishables. And the big Yeti cooler is filled with ice to keep the drinks and produce cool. But the question was always whether the solar panels would be able to keep up with the draw from two refrigeration units. The first night in Port Townsend I kept the boat off of shore power to see how far the batteries would draw down overnight. We started out at 100% charge after the run up from Seattle. When we left the next morning we were down to about 86%. Not too bad, and the engine charged the house bank back to 98% by the time we reached Friday Harbor.

    That was the first test. The next one was to see how the solar panels would do charging the batteries during the day. With just the refrigerator they would reliably charge the batteries to near 100% during the day but how would they do with the freezer as well? To find out I kept us off of shore power again last night. This morning we were at 88% and eventually dropped to 85% before the sun came up and the charge level started holding steady. By around 2:00 pm we were still at 85% but not climbing so I ran some tests.


    First, with the refrigerator and freezer both running and solar panels charging, the batteries are discharging at around -2Ah. That varies according to sunlight levels of course, but I'll use that as a baseline. Then I moved the cooler off of the house bank and to a 88Wh power pack. Depending on the calculations, that should run the freezer for 6-8 hours, maybe a bit more. With the freezer removed I checked the draw on the house bank again. With the refrigerator running the batteries discharge at around -1Ah. With the refrigerator off they charge at around 5Ah.

    Given the intermittent operation of the compressor(s) it seems like the solar panels provide just enough charge to power the refrigerator but not the freezer. Which is pretty much what I was expecting. But the question remains as to what to do about it. Add solar capacity is the ultimate answer of course. And more house bank capacity. But that doesn't help us right now. I'm going to keep the freezer on the power pack for a while to see how long I can expect it to last in the real world. We have two of the power packs so we might be able to extend our time at anchor using those before we have to run the engine. And we can eat the food in the freezer first so that we can shut it down. Any other suggestions?

    All this is complicated by our starter battery situation. Which is that we don't have one. It died shortly after we bought the boat and I have never gotten around to replacing it. We just start the engine from the house bank. The jump packs are aboard in case we run the house bank down and need to start the engine. Which they will do - I've tested it - but only if I don't run them down powering the freezer first... Yes, I know this is not a great plan. A new starting battery is on my list!
    - Chris

    Any single boat project will always expand to encompass the set of all possible boat projects.

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  6. #1511
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    I put a new novakool with a small freezer in my boat last year, i am surprised at how well the freezer works, it does ice up quite a bit over time though. How far north are you planning on heading on your cruise?

  7. #1512
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Quote Originally Posted by Penta2 View Post
    I put a new novakool with a small freezer in my boat last year, i am surprised at how well the freezer works, it does ice up quite a bit over time though. How far north are you planning on heading on your cruise?
    it’s possible that I have only experienced older, less effective freezers and the newer sort are better. But we are very happy with the Isotherm refrigerator so far. Except that it’s an Italian design and all the door shelves are too small for American-sized containers. But that’s a trivial and solvable problem.

    We are just hanging out in the San Juans again this year as we don’t really have time to go farther. Next year I hope we can get to the Gulf islands at least, if not past Johnstone. There are a million places up there that I’d like to visit.
    - Chris

    Any single boat project will always expand to encompass the set of all possible boat projects.

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  8. #1513
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    I like the door/latch set up on that isotherm, it look heavy duty. I had to laugh when i spent 1500$ on fridge for my boat and at home im using a 80’s westinghouse I probably couldnt give away. I have yet to cruise the san juan but just spent a few weeks up johnstone st area, at least you will get some sun! When i was up there in july we were running the oil stove just about every day and hardly saw the sun!

  9. #1514
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Quote Originally Posted by Penta2 View Post
    I like the door/latch set up on that isotherm, it look heavy duty. I had to laugh when i spent 1500$ on fridge for my boat and at home im using a 80’s westinghouse I probably couldnt give away. I have yet to cruise the san juan but just spent a few weeks up johnstone st area, at least you will get some sun! When i was up there in july we were running the oil stove just about every day and hardly saw the sun!
    The Isotherm does seem to be a quality unit, and that latch is indeed heavy duty, with a satisfying thunk when you shut it. And yes, we too have expensive appliances on the boat and cheap ones at the house. Not sure that that says about our priorities... The weather has been fantastic so far but still I'd love to be somewhere a bit more remote. Except that then I would not be posting here!
    - Chris

    Any single boat project will always expand to encompass the set of all possible boat projects.

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  10. #1515
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Continuing with our San Juan Islands cruise...

    Friday in Friday Harbor began with pancakes, eggs and sausage cooked on the butane burners as it was too hot to light the diesel stove. I’ll confess that for me half of the joy of cruising involves cooking, and half of the joy in cooking involves brunch.



    Something about being on the water makes any meal better. To this day one of the most memorable meals I have ever had was a humble sausage-and-cheese sandwich that my mother made for me when I was twelve or so, after I had struggled for a good thirty minutes to row myself, my sister, and our cat off the beach in Sequim Bay and back to our boat, St. Brendan, against a 20kt+ breeze. My parents had the engines running in case we needed to be rescued but in the end we made it back and that sandwich never tasted so good.



    My estimate of 6-8 hours of running the freezer from the power pack proved to be wildly optimistic, as it dropped to 50% after only two hours. So I gave in and hooked up to shore power. We will just have to keep an eye on the house bank charge level like we used to before we had the luxury of solar charging.

    We spent the day in Friday Harbor as we usually do - shopping for all the things we forgot to bring with us (butter!) and tackling miscellaneous projects that did not get done before we left. Then we ended the day with our annual wedding anniversary dinner from Downriggers restaurant. Happy anniversary to us. Sixteen years so far and many more to come.

    On Saturday I spent some time puzzling over the oil level in the Allison M20 marine gear. I have never been entirely satisfied that I am getting an accurate reading. I have been checking it cold and when the dipstick is first removed from the tube it is always completely dry. After reinserting and pulling it again the oil shows at the high level mark. I assume that that dipstick seal against the tube prevents oil from going up into it until the dipstick is removed, so that doesn’t worry me too much. However I know that the rear seal leaks a bit and I have never added oil, so how is the oil level always at the top?

    All the resources I have found (with the exception of the factory manual that is, which says nothing about it) say that the oil level must be checked with the oil warm and the engine at idle. So when we arrived in Friday harbor I checked the gear oil level before I shut down the engine. And found that it was well below the low mark and foamy besides. Both of which seemed to indicate that my concerns were valid and I had not been getting an accurate reading.

    Given the very low reading I thought I needed to add at least two quarts to the gear so on Saturday I pulled out a spare half-gallon of Delo 100 and dumped it in. Only to find oil overflowing from the fill tube and running down the outside of the gear housing. Not ideal! I cleaned up the mess and thought some more. Another cold level check now showed the oil level above the high mark. Am I misunderstanding the directions for checking the oil level? Maybe the “engine at idle” direction just means “not in gear”, not that it has to be running? If the oil is circulating in the gear I can see that the level would be lower in the sump, so maybe it needs a bit more time for all the oil to collect back in the sump after the gear is stopped?

    The factory manual for the gear says only that the “oil level should be checked at each change of shift or daily as the case may be. When checking the oil level, disengage the clutch or clutches and stop the gears.” Nothing about hot or cold or drain time or anything else. So I’m inclined to go back to checking it cold and trusting that the level is correct. However now I have half a quart or so too much oil in the gear if the cold level check is accurate. Sometimes in trying to solve an imaginary problem I end up creating a real one.

    But the gear oil conundrum would have to wait for another day as it was check out time at Friday Harbor and we were headed to our next anchorage. So we started the reliable Detroit 3-71 (I half expected a deluge of oil from the gear but all proceeded as normal), cast off, and pointed north for Stuart Island under a light and clearing overcast.



    Reid Harbor on Stuart Island is one of our favorite spots. It’s not the prettiest harbor in the San Juans, or the most popular, most secluded, least crowded, most sheltered or any other superlative, but it has a combination of qualities that make it an ideal spot to drop the hook and just sit for a few days. Which we did.

    Once we found a spot to anchor we launched the Nutshell for the first time and Dash enjoyed rowing it around the harbor.



    So far we are very pleased with the new tender. It’s much roomier than the dinghy it replaced, rows nicely and goes well with the electric outboard too.

    The day ended with a golden sunset and the promise of a clear day ahead.





    To be continued…
    - Chris

    Any single boat project will always expand to encompass the set of all possible boat projects.

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  11. #1516
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    I work up on Sunday to a clear morning and a clock calm in Reid Harbor.



    After breakfast we hiked the trails on Stuart Island and paused for a view of Skookum Maru at anchor among the modern yachts.



    In the afternoon I turned to a task that Dash had been wanting me to do for days - setting up the sailing rig for the Nutshell. The boat came with a rudder, daggerboard, sail and a collection of spars to make a sprit rig but it had never been assembled so I was left with the project of figuring out how all went together. A task made more complicated by the many decades that have passed since the last time I rigged a small boat, my inexperience with the sprit rig, and the lack of any internet connection in Reid Harbor, meaning that I would have to figure it out from vague memories and a couple of photos I had downloaded to my phone. But no matter - it’s just a little dinghy. How hard can it be? You tie all the corners of the sail to the proper ends of the various spars, add a sheet, and there you go right? Hm. We'll see.

    First I laced the sail to the mast with some light cord that I found in the rope locker.



    Someday I’ll have to learn how to make a proper lashing but this should do for now.. Then I drilled the boom jaws for the tack and downhaul, and bent the sail to the boom.



    With the mast and boom done I rigged a loop with a stopper knot for the peak, and another makeshift lashing for the snotter.






    To be continued…
    - Chris

    Any single boat project will always expand to encompass the set of all possible boat projects.

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  12. #1517
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Getting the snotter in the right place was the hardest part. But with that done I quickly set up the sheet with a single block at the end of the boom and we were ready to try it out. Or almost. The rudder and tiller dropped in with no problems but the daggerboard jammed in the slot. Some trimming would be needed to make it fit.



    What I wanted for this job was a well-sharpened block plane. What I had was an ancient wood rasp that came with Skookum Maru in an assortment of random woodworking tools. But the rasp did the job well enough, if not with any elegance. Once tamed the daggerboard dropped in easily and the pram was rigged.



    It looked like a sprit rig should to my inexpert eye but the test would be in the sailing. Or the drifting, as the morning breeze had all but vanished by the time I took it for a test sail.



    What this photo does not show is my wife collapsing in giggles as I turned in slow circles a few yards away from Skookum Maru. She does not appreciate the plight of the poor sailor, trapped in the doldrums, with the water running low and the rum even lower. But wind or no wind, we had a sailboat!

    I took Dash aboard as crew and we set off to explore the bay. At a no great pace to be sure, but by diligently seeking out every cat’s paw we were able to ghost our way up the harbor, and even make a little bit of a wake in the puffs.



    I call that a good day.
    - Chris

    Any single boat project will always expand to encompass the set of all possible boat projects.

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  13. #1518
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Quote Originally Posted by cstevens View Post
    On Saturday I spent some time puzzling over the oil level in the Allison M20 marine gear. I have never been entirely satisfied that I am getting an accurate reading.
    That was our experience too. Strange and troubling. My solution: Do an oil change, draining the gear completely and filling it with the correct amount of oil (the manual tells you what that is, at least). Then note the dipstick reading in various operating conditions until you find one that shows the oil at the marked full level. Check it there in the future and forget about all the others.

    Another solution, almost as good: Fill the gear, and don't worry about it -- unless it no longer shifts well, or you see a big drop in gear oil pressure (I think I recall that engine oil and gear oil pressures are "or-ed" at the alarm) or you notice gallons of oil in sitting in the engine room bilge. That Allison gear was standard behind 6-71's, it's way overbuilt for the 3-71.

  14. #1519
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    My gearbox is a Borg Warner velvet drive that you test warm, and immediately after shutting the engine off.
    The level drops away reasonably quickly.

  15. #1520
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    We were just at Reid last week. I agree. With the beach, Rocky headlands, pastoral road, drinking water and light station, it's a very pleasant place to linger.


    The lack of wakes and ferry wash is also a bonus.
    Tales from the land and sea: http://terrapintales.wordpress.com/

  16. #1521
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    "I call that a good day"
    Any day spent bobbing about in a boat is a good day!
    I was born on a wooden boat that I built myself.
    Skiing is the next best thing to having wings.

  17. #1522
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Quote Originally Posted by _QB_ View Post
    That was our experience too. Strange and troubling. My solution: Do an oil change, draining the gear completely and filling it with the correct amount of oil (the manual tells you what that is, at least). Then note the dipstick reading in various operating conditions until you find one that shows the oil at the marked full level. Check it there in the future and forget about all the others.

    Another solution, almost as good: Fill the gear, and don't worry about it -- unless it no longer shifts well, or you see a big drop in gear oil pressure (I think I recall that engine oil and gear oil pressures are "or-ed" at the alarm) or you notice gallons of oil in sitting in the engine room bilge. That Allison gear was standard behind 6-71's, it's way overbuilt for the 3-71.
    All good suggestions I think. But what I know right now it that it is as full as it can get, and the oil level reads too high when checked cold. Also that the gear oil pressure was 100 psi at 1300 rpm (warm) before I added oil, and has not changed with the higher oil level. The spec I have found is 120 psi at 1800 rpm so I think it's close enough. Given these points, I am comfortable going back to checking the level cold and putting this entire diversion behind me. Except that I need to figure out what to do about the extra oil. I think I have a bulb syringe aboard...

    Quote Originally Posted by Slacko View Post
    My gearbox is a Borg Warner velvet drive that you test warm, and immediately after shutting the engine off.
    The level drops away reasonably quickly.
    I might try that Slacko, but I'm thinking the cold check is fine given my logic above. As Paul notes, it's a seventy year old piece of heavy iron built to hang off the back of a 6-71. I need to make sure it has enough oil but I don't need to get surgical about it. As long as the cold check is within spitting distance of correct I'm fine with it.

    Quote Originally Posted by Bruce Bateau View Post
    We were just at Reid last week. I agree. With the beach, Rocky headlands, pastoral road, drinking water and light station, it's a very pleasant place to linger.

    The lack of wakes and ferry wash is also a bonus.
    Sorry we missed you Bruce but I'm glad you got the Chebacco out for a cruise. I hope we get to read about it! We didn't do the walk out to the lighthouse this trip. I lured Tory and Dash into doing it a few years ago based on my memory of it being an easy walk. But that memory was 40 years old and not entirely accurate. It's a five-mile hike there and back with some decent climbing involved. They have not let me forget it yet...

    Quote Originally Posted by Rich Jones View Post
    "I call that a good day"
    Any day spent bobbing about in a boat is a good day!
    Indeed!

    We left Reid Harbor yesterday and ended up in Eastsound on Orcas Island. Which was not the best choice as the long fetch up the sound turned the 20kt southerly into a chop that started small but built to 3' or so as the sun went down.



    I knew that the anchorage was exposed to the south but had hoped that the forecast "S wind 10 to 20 kt. Wind waves 1 to 3 ft." would come through at the low end of the range. I gambled and lost and we bounced in the chop with Skookum Maru hunting in every gust. Maybe we need a riding sail.

    But with no other options within reach before dark we set the Rocna well at 5:1 with 200' of chain and I set an anchor alarm for peace of mind as well, and we settled in for it. I was probably being over cautious but the lee shore a hundred yards to the north loomed large in my imagination. However, the real problem is that my lovely wife does not do so well with the motion, and was feeling pretty grim after a couple of hours of bouncing around. She has acupressure wrist bands, which help a little. And we have Dramamine aboard, but she does not love the side effects. Anyone have a patent home remedy or miracle cure for motion sickness?

    The wind has died down a bit this morning but we are going to find a more comfortable place to stay once the crew is up and fed. More to come.
    - Chris

    Any single boat project will always expand to encompass the set of all possible boat projects.

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  18. #1523
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Dramamine makes me feel like crap. Bonine is much better IMO & works very well for me. Available at most pharmacies I believe.
    "If it ain't broke, you're not trying." - Red Green

  19. #1524
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Quote Originally Posted by cstevens View Post
    Given these points, I am comfortable going back to checking the level cold and putting this entire diversion behind me. Except that I need to figure out what to do about the extra oil. I think I have a bulb syringe aboard...
    In the oil change tote there is (was?) a hand plunger pump with a plastic pipe that fits down the MH's dipstick tube.

    We left Reid Harbor yesterday and ended up in Eastsound on Orcas Island. Which was not the best choice as the long fetch up the sound turned the 20kt southerly into a chop that started small but built to 3' or so as the sun went down.
    Eastsound the town is nice. Eastsound the anchorage...

  20. #1525
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Quote Originally Posted by Garret View Post
    Dramamine makes me feel like crap. Bonine is much better IMO & works very well for me. Available at most pharmacies I believe.
    Well hrm. I thought we had Bonine aboard but we only have Dramamine. Something to add to the stores for the next cruise then.

    Quote Originally Posted by _QB_ View Post
    In the oil change tote there is (was?) a hand plunger pump with a plastic pipe that fits down the MH's dipstick tube.

    Eastsound the town is nice. Eastsound the anchorage...
    Ah... That would be handy to have! I think I reorganized it into a bin of things that I removed from the boat though. Something else to (re)add to the stores for the next cruise.

    We never made it into Eastsound the town. The wind started picking up again so we bolted for a quieter anchorage.







    Much better. Right now we are in Eagle Harbor on Cypress Island. We've never been here before but we have wanted to visit for some time. Cypress is mostly a state park with plenty of hiking trails so we are looking forward to exploring on our last day cruising before we head home on Thursday.

    After we dropped anchor and took Scout ashore, Dash and I rowed to the head of the bay to have a look at this interesting little cruiser.



    She's an unpretentious thing with just enough room for a friendly couple to cruise for a few nights. I didn't recognize the design so I asked, and it turns out that she's a Weston Farmer Sundance hull with an owner-added cabin. In person the proportions look just right. Big enough for comfort but not at all top heavy. Just a sweet little boat. With a Swampscott dory for a tender, which could not be more perfect.

    On the way over from Eastsound we went through Obstruction Pass. We've been through here before but somehow I never noticed this collection of vessels and buildings before:



    It looks like no less than three schooners, a big ketch, some sort of large powerboat up on ways and another sailboat careened on the beach. Mystic Seaport in miniature hidden up on Orcas Island. Does anyone know what the story is here? It has to be interesting!
    - Chris

    Any single boat project will always expand to encompass the set of all possible boat projects.

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  21. #1526
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    I think that might be the Obstruction Pass Resort. We stayed there about 20 years ago on a motorcycle sidecar trip and I remember some fine boats there then.

    Do make the hike on Cypress to the eagle cliffs. It's a great viewDSCN2716.jpg
    What's not on a boat costs nothing, weighs nothing, and can't break

  22. #1527
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Chris,
    I believe that the big schooner there is Frank Prothero's Glory of the Seas. Also, I have one of those Gas One burners and while I really like it its worth mentioning that if you do use the propane adapter and its at all loose you can wind up with a lot more fire than you want too, makes life interesting for a few moments. Thanks a ton for sharing your trip.
    Nicholas

  23. #1528
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Quote Originally Posted by Pelirrojo View Post
    Chris,
    I believe that the big schooner there is Frank Prothero's Glory of the Seas. Also, I have one of those Gas One burners and while I really like it its worth mentioning that if you do use the propane adapter and its at all loose you can wind up with a lot more fire than you want too, makes life interesting for a few moments. Thanks a ton for sharing your trip.
    Nicholas
    Ah - thanks for the tip Nicholas! I haven't tried the propane adapters yet and have been wary of using them. They would be handy, as the little butane canisters are expensive and don't last very long, but I wouldn't use the propane inside I think.

    As for the schooners and assorted other traditional craft in Obstruction Pass, I did find some info. As Bobcat noted, it's a resort called Lieber Haven:

    http://www.lieberhavenresort.com/

    The site makes great reading. It looks like the big schooner is named Lieber Schwan and was built by the resort owners decades ago. I'm not sure what the other boats are but I thought Glory of the Seas had been cut up in Port Townsend a few years back? I would love to hear that didn't happen.

    The resort sounds like a fantastic place, and also like an anachronism that may not last for very much longer. I would have loved to stop and explore but that will have to wait for another trip. Tomorrow we are going to explore Cypress Island a bit, and then we have to plot a course for home and back to the nine-to-five.
    - Chris

    Any single boat project will always expand to encompass the set of all possible boat projects.

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  24. #1529
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    I use Stugeron for motion sickness.
    No side effects that I've noticed.

  25. #1530
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Victoria, BC, Canada
    Posts
    1,854

    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Neither dramamine or bonine do it for me but Dave Lesser brought some Stugeron along on an offshore passage to San Francisco a few years ago. Miracle cure for me, not seasick at all in some pretty heavy swells and motion.

    Stugeron is not available in Canada but is in the UK and I was able to order some from an online pharmacy there.
    Alex

    “It's only those who do nothing that make no mistakes, I suppose.”
    - Joseph Conrad, An Outcast of the Islands

    http://www.alexzimmerman.ca

  26. #1531
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Posts
    5,608

    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Quote Originally Posted by Slacko View Post
    I use Stugeron for motion sickness.
    No side effects that I've noticed.
    Quote Originally Posted by AJZimm View Post
    Neither dramamine or bonine do it for me but Dave Lesser brought some Stugeron along on an offshore passage to San Francisco a few years ago. Miracle cure for me, not seasick at all in some pretty heavy swells and motion.

    Stugeron is not available in Canada but is in the UK and I was able to order some from an online pharmacy there.
    Thanks. I've heard of Stugeron but as it's not available in the US either I've never tried it. I'll have to see about getting some from the UK though, as a good motion sickness cure would make my wife's cruising experience much more enjoyable.
    - Chris

    Any single boat project will always expand to encompass the set of all possible boat projects.

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  27. #1532
    Join Date
    Feb 2017
    Location
    Seattle, W.A., U.S.A
    Posts
    302

    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    No, Glory of the Seas was not cut up, she was saved and currently is afloat and sailing albeit with a giant plywood patch over a large area of bad planking. She has a fairly active instagram page and it is my understanding that the current owner has the experience necessary to see the project through.

    Nicholas

  28. #1533
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Wellington, NZ
    Posts
    1,034

    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Stugeron does appear to be available in US.
    https://www.northwestpharmacy.com/pr...ugeron-regular

  29. #1534
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    San Diego and Gabriola
    Posts
    280

    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Re the oil hand pump...

    Quote Originally Posted by cstevens View Post
    Ah... That would be handy to have! I think I reorganized it into a bin of things that I removed from the boat though. Something else to (re)add to the stores for the next cruise.
    We used it to change the Allison's oil and it's tedious to use it to pump the one and half gallons out. IMO better than replacing it would be to plumb the Allison's sump drain (it is low on the centerline of the rear of its oil pan) to be valved into the engine's oil change pump. That thing makes oil changes almost easy.

  30. #1535
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Location
    SW Washington/ At Sea
    Posts
    521

    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Sounds like a great trip! Motion sickness is a bummer but usually goes away after a day or two? I always found that when I was queasy as a kid sleeping helped and I’d wake up feeling 100%. Skookum Maru is a beauty and the view through the windshield is great…I was talking with some friends the other day about how fast people go when they’re headed somewhere. People with ‘fast’ boats (16-20 knots) like a 26’ bartender were saying that it’s much more pleasant and fun to cruise at 6-7 knots and actually see the scenery. Where are you headed next? Thanks for sharing your trip.

  31. #1536
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Chesapeake Bay
    Posts
    367

    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Nice job rigging your pram! And thanks for taking us along on your trip.

  32. #1537
    Join Date
    Oct 2017
    Location
    Berkeley, CA
    Posts
    411

    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Thanks for bringing us along on your cruise!

    The pram rig looks good. If you find that the spiral lacing you have used results in uneven tension or bunching, give forth-and-back lacing a try, it can be easier to get even tension with that lacing method. It's quite simple, at each grommet you just reverse the direction the line goes around the spar.

  33. #1538
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Posts
    5,608

    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Quote Originally Posted by Pelirrojo View Post
    No, Glory of the Seas was not cut up, she was saved and currently is afloat and sailing albeit with a giant plywood patch over a large area of bad planking. She has a fairly active instagram page and it is my understanding that the current owner has the experience necessary to see the project through.

    Nicholas
    Ah - that's good news. I just checked out the Instagram page. Good to see her active again. The last I saw she was sitting on the hard in PT with a gaping hole in her.

    Quote Originally Posted by Slacko View Post
    Stugeron does appear to be available in US.
    https://www.northwestpharmacy.com/pr...ugeron-regular
    Ah! That site is Canadian but that's not a barrier. I'll get some and see how it works for us. Thanks!

    Quote Originally Posted by _QB_ View Post
    Re the oil hand pump...



    We used it to change the Allison's oil and it's tedious to use it to pump the one and half gallons out. IMO better than replacing it would be to plumb the Allison's sump drain (it is low on the centerline of the rear of its oil pan) to be valved into the engine's oil change pump. That thing makes oil changes almost easy.
    Yes, that would be useful and clever. And easy to do if I'm changing the oil anyway. Good thought.

    Quote Originally Posted by Powerwagon View Post
    Sounds like a great trip! Motion sickness is a bummer but usually goes away after a day or two? I always found that when I was queasy as a kid sleeping helped and I’d wake up feeling 100%. Skookum Maru is a beauty and the view through the windshield is great…I was talking with some friends the other day about how fast people go when they’re headed somewhere. People with ‘fast’ boats (16-20 knots) like a 26’ bartender were saying that it’s much more pleasant and fun to cruise at 6-7 knots and actually see the scenery. Where are you headed next? Thanks for sharing your trip.
    Thanks Powerwagon. Unfortunately for my wife it doesn't seem to go away so any cure would be a huge improvement for her. Fortunately it's not all the time, but any sort of swell or chop does her in.


    Quote Originally Posted by The Jeff View Post
    Nice job rigging your pram! And thanks for taking us along on your trip.
    Thanks Jeff!

    Quote Originally Posted by nrs5000 View Post
    Thanks for bringing us along on your cruise!

    The pram rig looks good. If you find that the spiral lacing you have used results in uneven tension or bunching, give forth-and-back lacing a try, it can be easier to get even tension with that lacing method. It's quite simple, at each grommet you just reverse the direction the line goes around the spar.
    Yes. re-lacing the sail is on my list. I'll try that pattern. Thanks!

    We spent two nights in Eagle Harbor and we will definitely be back. We hiked on the island...





    rowed around the harbor...







    ...and went "sailing" at sunset, which turned into drifting again when the wind died away completely. Fortunately we had oars aboard.



    Cypress is a nature preserve and feels much more wild than most of the other islands in the San Juans. Eagle Harbor is sheltered from any direction except the east and was a quiet anchorage when we were there. It's a lovely place and we are already planning a return visit.
    - Chris

    Any single boat project will always expand to encompass the set of all possible boat projects.

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  34. #1539
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Posts
    5,608

    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    This morning I woke up early, while the rest of the crew were still sleeping, and was treated to this magnificent sunrise



    before raising anchor and getting underway down Bellingham Channel.



    The clouds burned off as we motored down Rosario Strait and into the Strait of Juan de Fuca and we had another perfect day for crossing the Strait



    and the run down Puget Sound.



    Now we are tied up at Shilshole Marina.



    We are supposed to have a slip subleased here for the next few weeks but it's still occupied so we are moored on the guest dock until that gets sorted out. Good enough. This cruise could have been longer but the house-and-dog sitter had to leave and work is piling up so it's time to head home for a hot shower and dinner before coming back tomorrow for the post-cruise cleanup and then back to the daily routine. Why do I have a job again?
    - Chris

    Any single boat project will always expand to encompass the set of all possible boat projects.

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  35. #1540
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Hills of Vermont, USA
    Posts
    45,073

    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    'Cause the job paid for the boat?

    This coming from the guy who's up at 5:30 to get some work finished to deliver to a client this AM. However, I allow myself 15-20 with the first cup of coffee visiting here and elsewhere.
    "If it ain't broke, you're not trying." - Red Green

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