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Thread: Skookum Maru

  1. #1436
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Looking forward to further adventures, Chris. These days I have to do my boating vicariously

  2. #1437
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Welcome back
    What's not on a boat costs nothing, weighs nothing, and can't break

  3. #1438
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    The list of boat projects is long and getting longer, as it tends to do, but one has to start somewhere.

    The Whirlwind runabout we used as a tender last year did a great job of hauling three humans and two large-ish dogs ashore...



    ... but the paint and varnish were well past the best-by date when we bought the boat and the noisy, leaky old Evinrude outboard left a haze of unburned two-stroke mix everywhere we went. Very antisocial. So some work is needed to get it ready for this year. The plan is to strip and refinish the hull inside and out, and to replace the gasoline motor with the electric EP-Carry that we used on the rowing dinghy last year. The little electric motor will only propel the boat at 4kts or so, but that's all we need for shore trips.

    I spent yesterday clearing a spot for the boat in the shop and the moving it from our driveway.



    Next step is to get the OB off of the transom and make some stands to support it during refinishing.
    - Chris

    Any single boat project will always expand to encompass the set of all possible boat projects.

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  4. #1439
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Quote Originally Posted by cstevens View Post
    The Whirlwind runabout we used as a tender last year did a great job of hauling three humans and two large-ish dogs ashore...

    You know, sometimes you can see the translation of the Salish pidgin word "skookum" as "fit for purpose". In that sense, that Whirlwind is a right skookum tender for Skookum Maru.

  5. #1440
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Quote Originally Posted by _QB_ View Post
    You know, sometimes you can see the translation of the Salish pidgin word "skookum" as "fit for purpose". In that sense, that Whirlwind is a right skookum tender for Skookum Maru.
    She really is Paul. Big enough for all of us but quite light and she tows easily.



    I wasn't sure about managing a tender this large but now that we have done it, I am entirely happy with the decision. She needs a name though. I have thought of naming her Hyak, which (as I expect you know) is Chinook jargon for "fast". Of course she won't be very fast with the little electric motor but at some point I'd like to upgrade the motor to something that would be powerful enough for day trips and island hopping.

    On another subject, a while back I moved the shutoff valve for the stove fuel line to the front of the cabinet under the stove so it would be easier to reach.



    But shortly after I did that it started leaking from the stem seal. So I replaced it with another, more expensive, and presumably better valve under the theory that if I spent enough money on it the thing would have to be reliable. However the new one started leaking as well. Not very much - a few drops a day perhaps - but still not desirable. Feeling somewhat grumpy about the project by this point I just shut off the fuel at the day tank (there are two valves on the line), put a drip tray under the leaky valve and left it.

    I've been avoiding the project ever since but I do need to deal with it at some point. I just doing something wrong here? Is it a bad idea to install a ball valve upside down? It seems to me that orientation shouldn't matter? It's also possible that the latest leak is not from the valve stem, but from a poorly sealed pipe joint. The fuel may be leaking along the body of the valve and dripping from the stem - it's difficult to tell. All the pipe joints are tight and sealed with thread tape. The flare joints seem fine as well. I've never had so much trouble getting a fuel line to seal before.
    - Chris

    Any single boat project will always expand to encompass the set of all possible boat projects.

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  6. #1441
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Can you clean it really well (alcohol or the like) - get it really dry & then check it every few hours or whatever timeframe is appropriate? A ball valve should not have an issue being upside down. Just to ask a probably stupid question - you did get a valve that can handle fuel, right? Kero/diesel on a water valve might disintegrate seals.
    "If it ain't broke, you're not trying." - Red Green

  7. #1442
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Quote Originally Posted by Garret View Post
    Can you clean it really well (alcohol or the like) - get it really dry & then check it every few hours or whatever timeframe is appropriate? A ball valve should not have an issue being upside down. Just to ask a probably stupid question - you did get a valve that can handle fuel, right? Kero/diesel on a water valve might disintegrate seals.
    Ah... good question Garret. But yes, both the old and new valves are rated for oil and gas. This is the one that is installed now:

    https://www.fisheriessupply.com/groc...-valve/ibv-250

    I agree - the clean and check routine is the right approach. Find out where the leak is actually coming from first. I'm getting tired of taking this line apart and putting it back together again but I guess it won't fix itself. Project for today then.
    - Chris

    Any single boat project will always expand to encompass the set of all possible boat projects.

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  8. #1443
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    For the clean and check you can swamp it down with alcohol and then mark all over with a marker...dry-erase or wide tip felt pen should work. The diesel should dissolve a path showing you right away where it's coming from. I've tracked down deck leaks using dry-erase marker as it can be cleaned up with water.

  9. #1444
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    in the past, i have had a hard time getting a good seal on diesel or gasoline fittings when using white teflon tape.
    i've had better luck with the yellow tape or Gasoila paste-type thread sealant

  10. #1445
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Your thread tape looks like it's for waterlines. You need the yellow stuff for diesel and propane. / Jim

  11. #1446
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Quote Originally Posted by chas View Post
    Your thread tape looks like it's for waterlines. You need the yellow stuff for diesel and propane. / Jim
    Well hm. I think I knew that? Not sure why it didn’t occur to me before. Ok then.
    - Chris

    Any single boat project will always expand to encompass the set of all possible boat projects.

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  12. #1447
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Since I think Jim is right, and the thread seal tape I used is not rated for diesel, the fuel line needs to come entirely apart anyway. But it's not something I felt like dealing with today, so instead I made a little progress on the Whirlwind.

    The first task was to take down the gantries I built in the small garage last year, so I can use them to lift heavy things in the shop.



    Then I set one up so I could lift the Evinrude off of the transom.



    Done.



    That was the easy part though. The next step is mostly sanding, sanding, and more sanding.
    - Chris

    Any single boat project will always expand to encompass the set of all possible boat projects.

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  13. #1448
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Gotta love that Studebaker pickup, Chris - is that dog walking behind it in the middle photo one of your group ?



    Rick
    Charter Member - - Professional Procrastinators Association of America - - putting things off since 1965 " I'll get around to it tomorrow, .... maybe "

  14. #1449
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Quote Originally Posted by hawkeye54 View Post
    Gotta love that Studebaker pickup, Chris - is that dog walking behind it in the middle photo one of your group ?



    Rick
    Ha! No, just a photo bomb from a random dog. Ours are Addie



    and Scout



    They run things around here.
    - Chris

    Any single boat project will always expand to encompass the set of all possible boat projects.

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  15. #1450
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Back to work on the Whirlwind today.





    A journey of a thousand miles begins with a single step...



    First job is to strip the interior paint and refinish. It should really be finished bright inside but I'm on the fence about that. This boat is never going to be a museum piece and a painted finish seems a lot more practical for a tender that will be hauling dogs and kids to and from the beach.
    - Chris

    Any single boat project will always expand to encompass the set of all possible boat projects.

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  16. #1451
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Quote Originally Posted by cstevens View Post
    Back to work on the Whirlwind today.

    A journey of a thousand miles begins with a single step...

    First job is to strip the interior paint and refinish. It should really be finished bright inside but I'm on the fence about that. This boat is never going to be a museum piece and a painted finish seems a lot more practical for a tender that will be hauling dogs and kids to and from the beach.
    Paint makes complete sense.
    "If it ain't broke, you're not trying." - Red Green

  17. #1452
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Chris, take a look at the thread 'The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy' by Mike1902 in Building / Repair , particularly pages 19, 20, 21 for ideas on painting of the interior.




    Rick
    Charter Member - - Professional Procrastinators Association of America - - putting things off since 1965 " I'll get around to it tomorrow, .... maybe "

  18. #1453
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Quote Originally Posted by Garret View Post
    Paint makes complete sense.
    Quote Originally Posted by hawkeye54 View Post
    Chris, take a look at the thread 'The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy' by Mike1902 in Building / Repair , particularly pages 19, 20, 21 for ideas on painting of the interior.
    Thanks Garret and Rick. Yes, I agree that paint is the right idea here. I spent some time looking at photos of small utility runabouts and there are plenty with painted interiors that look very nice, so that's the plan then.

    Mike1902's dinghy is an amazing project but I only dip into the thread occasionally because that level of attention to detail reminds me of my own obsessive tendencies - a character trait that I have spent many years working to minimize. Which is a story worth telling.

    When I was much younger, with such things as a disposable income, I spent most of my time and all of my money working on old cars and motorcycles. I had a rotating collection of interesting machinery - Volvo 122s, BMW 2002, Mercedes 250c, Moto Guzzi Le Mans, Maserati Sebring, Alfa Giulietta Spider Veloce and others. It was a lot of fun, but I could never just enjoy them for what they were, accepting whatever flaws they had as part of the deal. So most of the time whatever vehicles I had would site in the shop in various stages of disassembly, mid-restoration.

    Inevitably I would become dissatisfied with the condition of some car or bike and it would be sold on. I once sold a beautiful agave green, round taillight, BMW 2002 because it had a tiny dent in the driver's door - a dent so small you would never see it if you didn't know it was there. But I did know, and so I sold it to a man in California without regrets (at the time - I have them now. You could never find once that nice now for ten times what I sold it for back then).

    Or I would become convinced that some vehicle needed a complete nut and bolt restoration. I had a wonderful, original, pale green 1963 Volvo 122s wagon that I used as a daily driver for many years. I loved that car. Then one Halloween someone threw a pumpkin at it and put a huge dent in the tailgate. It would have been simple enough to have the dent pulled and the panel paint matched to the rest of the car, but in my madness I decided that the only thing to do was so take the entire car apart and restore it back to new condition. So I did. The disassembly part at least. I spend weeks tearing it down and boxing up all the pieces. I had the shell sandblasted and the dent in the tailgate repaired, and started restoring the suspension bits. But other projects intervened and I ended up selling it as a bare shell and a bunch of boxes or parts to a guy in Louisiana. That was twenty years ago. I still exchange email with him every few years and that Volvo is still in pieces. If I hadn't taken it apart I might be driving it today. I miss that old Volvo.

    But the project that convinced me that I needed a new approach was this one - my last (of many) Honda CB400F.



    At one point it was a very-nice-but-not-perfect driver quality bike. I commuted on it, rode it around town, and ran it with a group of friends on weekend rides. It was just a great bike and I enjoyed every minute with it. Until I did a dumb thing while fixing a broken kick starter recoil spring and broke the bottom engine case casting. Which mean that the engine had to come out to split the cases and repair the casting. And of course while the engine was out I decided to have the frame stripped and painted. And since the frame was being painted I should really have the tank and side covers painted too, and soon my simple repair turned into a full restoration. And not just a restoration, but the creation of my ideal vision of the perfect Honda CB400F.

    It took seven years.

    During that time I was on first name basis with Sarah, the woman who ran the parts counter at University Honda, since I was there every weekend buying pieces for the project. Eventually I replaced every single part on the bike except the frame, engine, and a few other large pieces, with NOS Honda stock. Sarah found the last NOS CB400F tank in the country, and the last NOS exhaust as well. The front brake was replaced with upgraded parts from a Honda GP bike. I had custom wider wheels built to run Avon vintage racing tires that I got through the back door from a contact that I knew from road racing. The forks were upgraded and the swingarm bushings were replaced with roller bearings. And the end result was everything that I had hoped for. It was immaculate. It gleamed. It was improved in every area over the original. It was a superlative version of a CB400F. And I almost never rode it.

    After it was done I realized that I didn't really want a perfect bike after all. I loved the idea of the perfect CB400F, and I still do, but in reality it was... dull. And in its very perfection I lost everything that I had loved about the original. Instead of throwing it around every curve and wringing the throttle to the stop on every straight - which is how a 400F needs to be ridden - I was too worried about scratching the paint or getting rust spots on the new chrome. It was beautiful and I spent many hours just looking at it, but that's not what motorcycles are for. So I sold it to a guy in Hawaii. And you know what? I don't miss that bike at all. I miss the bike it used to be before I restored it.

    So I learned something about myself. I still have the urge to make things perfect. I am still tempted to turn every project into a complete restoration. But I know that urge is an illusion - it won't make me happy. So I spent five years poking away at fixing up a shabby old troller, and I loved every minute of it - even the part where it nearly sank under me. I have an old Studebaker pickup truck with flaking paint, rust in the bed and dents everywhere, and it's the one vehicle I will never sell. Skookum Maru is a lovely boat but she isn't perfect. At one time I would have only seen her flaws, and would have obsessed over fixing them. It took years of self examination to know that the flaws are what I love the most.
    - Chris

    Any single boat project will always expand to encompass the set of all possible boat projects.

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  19. #1454
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Quote Originally Posted by cstevens View Post

    Mike1902's dinghy is an amazing project but I only dip into the thread occasionally because that level of attention to detail reminds me of my own obsessive tendencies - a character trait that I have spent many years working to minimize. Which is a story worth telling.


    You win
    Focus on the effort not the outcome.

  20. #1455
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Quote Originally Posted by cstevens View Post
    So I learned something about myself. I still have the urge to make things perfect. I am still tempted to turn every project into a complete restoration. But I know that urge is an illusion - it won't make me happy. So I spent five years poking away at fixing up a shabby old troller, and I loved every minute of it - even the part where it nearly sank under me. I have an old Studebaker pickup truck with flaking paint, rust in the bed and dents everywhere, and it's the one vehicle I will never sell. Skookum Maru is a lovely boat but she isn't perfect. At one time I would have only seen her flaws, and would have obsessed over fixing them. It took years of self examination to know that the flaws are what I love the most.
    Your tale of the Honda brings to mind these lines from a Shakespeare sonnet:
    Were it not sinful then, striving to mend,
    To mar the subject that before was well?

    Which is, of course, one more way of phrasing that old aphorism: “The perfect is the enemy of the good”

    In my current build, no one will ever accuse me of trying to make it perfect.
    Last edited by AJZimm; 06-05-2022 at 08:50 AM. Reason: punctuation
    Alex

    “It's only those who do nothing that make no mistakes, I suppose.”
    - Joseph Conrad, An Outcast of the Islands

    http://www.alexzimmerman.ca

  21. #1456
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Love your prose Chris #1453. And selection of vehicles, I still lust after a moto guzzi.

  22. #1457
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    It's good to know yourself. My problem is I'm at the other end of the spectrum. A good temporary fix and too often I'm done
    What's not on a boat costs nothing, weighs nothing, and can't break

  23. #1458
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Per post #1450, I’m an advocate of soy gel for stripping paint and varnish. Amazing stuff. Much quicker and more thorough than heat gun and scraper. It gets way back into corners/crevices too. Everything just sloughs off.
    Quote Originally Posted by James McMullen View Post
    Yeadon is right, of course.

  24. #1459
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Quote Originally Posted by Mike1902 View Post
    You win
    Cheers Mike. The thing I forgot to say is that I have learned, and continue to learn, a tremendous amount from all the real craftspeople here. I will likely never need to make a Spitfire-foil centerboard but I enjoy seeing how it's done. And I'll probably steal your hull-rotating tackle design when I'm ready to flip the Whirlwind. I admire the skill and dedication needed to turn a tatty old dinghy into a work of art but I continually have to remind myself that I can admire it without needing to emulate it.

    Quote Originally Posted by AJZimm View Post
    Your tale of the Honda brings to mind these lines from a Shakespeare sonnet:
    Were it not sinful then, striving to mend,
    To mar the subject that before was well?

    Which is, of course, one more way of phrasing that old aphorism: “The perfect is the enemy of the good”

    In my current build, no one will ever accuse me of trying to make it perfect.
    Yes - that's exactly it Alex. That Shakespeare had a way with words didn't he? (Or she, or they, depending on your preferred Shakespeare origin story). "If it ain't broke, don't fix it" as the saying goes. Something I'm still trying to learn.

    Quote Originally Posted by Andrew Donald View Post
    Love your prose Chris #1453. And selection of vehicles, I still lust after a moto guzzi.
    Thanks Andrew! I think everyone should own a Moto Guzzi at some point. Preferably a 1970s Le Mans Mk 1. They are objectively terrible bikes to ride. Heavy controls, freight train handling, clunky gearbox full of false neutrals... But somehow the sum of all those flaws creates the perfect Italian road bike. I had an early-90s Ducati 900SS before the Le Mans. The Ducati was a wonderful bike and superior in every way to the Le Mans but I never loved it the way I loved that Guzzi.

    Quote Originally Posted by Bobcat View Post
    It's good to know yourself. My problem is I'm at the other end of the spectrum. A good temporary fix and too often I'm done
    Nothing wrong with that I think, especially if you would rather spend your time doing other things. Which is really the lesson I am trying to learn myself. Some people find enjoyment in perfect varnish and gleaming chrome. I see them down at the dock every decent weekend and their boats are lovely to look at. But I'd rather have a ten-foot (or twenty-foot) finish and not worry too much about sandy feet on the cockpit sole.

    One of the things that I love about wooden boats is that they reveal many truths about ourselves. I used to think that I was someone who wanted a big, fast, perfectly-restored Huckins. So I spent a decade working on Perihelion, only to learn that I didn't want those things at all. Then I thought I wanted to restore an old fishing boat and go cruising. I spent five years working on Petrel and learned that old fishing boats are fun projects but terrible cruising boats for a family. Maybe the real lesson here is that I am a very slow learner! But serendipity (and Paul K.) brought Skookum Maru into our lives, and I've learned that it's enough for me to just be the caretaker of something that does not need to be restored or perfected, but merely used the way her designer intended.
    - Chris

    Any single boat project will always expand to encompass the set of all possible boat projects.

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  25. #1460
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Quote Originally Posted by Yeadon View Post
    Per post #1450, I’m an advocate of soy gel for stripping paint and varnish. Amazing stuff. Much quicker and more thorough than heat gun and scraper. It gets way back into corners/crevices too. Everything just sloughs off.
    Thanks Tim. I've tried gel stripper in the past and was not a fan of the mess, but for this job it might be the right choice. Worth a try.
    - Chris

    Any single boat project will always expand to encompass the set of all possible boat projects.

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  26. #1461
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Ha, yes - it’s an absolutely disgusting mess while you’re working with it until you have it all cleaned up and wiped down. I tend to wash the area with a hose once I’m all done and that seems to really finish the job.
    Quote Originally Posted by James McMullen View Post
    Yeadon is right, of course.

  27. #1462
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Per Tim's recommendation I stopped at the local hardware store and picked up some soy gel stripper on the way to the shop this morning.



    I've used it before but I've never found it to be worth the mess and clean up effort, but maybe it's time to give it another chance. So I slathered it over a test area...



    ...and let it sit while I worked on removing hardware and seats from the interior.



    After an hour I tested it with a disposable putty knife to see how it was doing at softening the paint.



    It took off some of the top layer of paint, but didn't get much past that. So I left it for another hour and then used a sharper blade to scrape the rest of the patch.



    That worked a bit better. It took off most of the first layer. I think another application would be needed to remove the rest. It's definitely slower than the heat gun method, but it's far easier and the waiting time can be used for other tasks so I'm sold. I'm planning to strip the rest of the interior with chemicals and use the wait time to sand the exterior varnish.
    - Chris

    Any single boat project will always expand to encompass the set of all possible boat projects.

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  28. #1463
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Funny, after reading that suggestion I ran up to Rockler in Northgate to buy a quart of the stuff. I just got home. I have two portlights that are painted shut. I want to make them functional again, but I want to be gentle about it.

  29. #1464
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    For application, I put on nitrile gloves and then use my hands to spread it out as thick as possible. Pretty fast to work that way. I've had luck spreading it on thick and then covering it up with kitchen garbage bags. It dries/kicks much slower and reaches in a bit deeper. Also useful for that very last scrub ... those "doodlebug" 3M pads they sell at Fisheries. Those and a hose really get it clean.

    What a lame job, but it works!
    Quote Originally Posted by James McMullen View Post
    Yeadon is right, of course.

  30. #1465
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Hi Chris,
    Cool boat.
    If you incorporate that lifting tackle into the process sooner rather than later, it will certainly ease the pain both physically and mentally.
    With that system in place the benefits of working at a comfortable angle pays dividends.
    A line that can be swapped from side to side to enable the boat to rotate both ways once hung and a brace to hold all steady while you work will speed up the process considerably...plus your lower back will love you.

    Cheers,
    Mike.
    Focus on the effort not the outcome.

  31. #1466
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Great progress on the Whirlwind, Chris - and a great write up in post # 1453. I have also found I have a tendency toward 'the relentless pursuit of perfection' , due perhaps to a career in the computer hardware, banking, and biomedical equipment fields, where a repair HAD to be perfect. Hard work on that sort of thing has gotten me to the '20 foot finish' level, but it was not easy .



    Rick
    Charter Member - - Professional Procrastinators Association of America - - putting things off since 1965 " I'll get around to it tomorrow, .... maybe "

  32. #1467
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    If one uses a hose for final clean up of the stripper... where does the waste paint/stripper go?

    I suspect the answer is: The storm drain, then Puget Sound.

    Jeff

  33. #1468
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Quote Originally Posted by RobK View Post
    Funny, after reading that suggestion I ran up to Rockler in Northgate to buy a quart of the stuff. I just got home. I have two portlights that are painted shut. I want to make them functional again, but I want to be gentle about it.
    I'd definitely recommend it for that purpose Rob. Good luck with the portlights!

    Quote Originally Posted by Yeadon View Post
    For application, I put on nitrile gloves and then use my hands to spread it out as thick as possible. Pretty fast to work that way. I've had luck spreading it on thick and then covering it up with kitchen garbage bags. It dries/kicks much slower and reaches in a bit deeper. Also useful for that very last scrub ... those "doodlebug" 3M pads they sell at Fisheries. Those and a hose really get it clean.

    What a lame job, but it works!
    Ha - I never would have thought of just squoozing it on with my hands. I'll try it next time. How long could you reasonably leave it on under the garbage bags do you think? I'm contemplating heading down there one evening this week to goop up a large area, covering it, and leaving it until the next evening (24 hours). Possible?


    Quote Originally Posted by Mike1902 View Post
    Hi Chris,
    Cool boat.
    If you incorporate that lifting tackle into the process sooner rather than later, it will certainly ease the pain both physically and mentally.
    With that system in place the benefits of working at a comfortable angle pays dividends.
    A line that can be swapped from side to side to enable the boat to rotate both ways once hung and a brace to hold all steady while you work will speed up the process considerably...plus your lower back will love you.

    Cheers,
    Mike.
    Thanks Mike. Makes sense, but for now the trailer is working pretty well. The boat is at a good working height and it's supported well enough that I can climb inside for better access. But I'll need to flip the boat to do the bottom.

    Quote Originally Posted by hawkeye54 View Post
    Great progress on the Whirlwind, Chris - and a great write up in post # 1453. I have also found I have a tendency toward 'the relentless pursuit of perfection' , due perhaps to a career in the computer hardware, banking, and biomedical equipment fields, where a repair HAD to be perfect. Hard work on that sort of thing has gotten me to the '20 foot finish' level, but it was not easy .



    Rick
    Thanks Rick. I agree - working in tech creates certain performance expectations. That's part of my problem. Boats are an antidote to my day job so I can't get too obsessive about them. (Well, I can. I'm just trying not to!)

    Quote Originally Posted by jpatrick View Post
    If one uses a hose for final clean up of the stripper... where does the waste paint/stripper go?

    I suspect the answer is: The storm drain, then Puget Sound.

    Jeff
    Yes, true. But to give Tim the benefit of the doubt here I think he meant that the hose would only be the last step after all the stripper and waste had been removed and discarded in a more responsible manner. More a surface prep step than a cleanup step. I'm thinking I will likely just wipe it down, but if I do use a hose for the last bit I'd trailer the boat to the car wash (after removing as much waste as possible first) and use the water separator there to prevent any runoff into the Sound.
    - Chris

    Any single boat project will always expand to encompass the set of all possible boat projects.

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  34. #1469
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Salt Lake City, Utah
    Posts
    312

    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Quote Originally Posted by cstevens View Post
    When I was much younger, with such things as a disposable income, I spent most of my time and all of my money working on old cars and motorcycles. I had a rotating collection of interesting machinery - Volvo 122s, BMW 2002, Mercedes 250c, Moto Guzzi Le Mans, Maserati Sebring, Alfa Giulietta Spider Veloce and others. It was a lot of fun, but I could never just enjoy them for what they were, accepting whatever flaws they had as part of the deal. So most of the time whatever vehicles I had would site in the shop in various stages of disassembly, mid-restoration.



    You do amazing restoration work. I have messed around with old motorcycles and cars but not to the extent that you have! Is that the Mercedes 250C in the background?

    I had a 1980 Mercedes 300CD for a while. The coupe was an interesting car, built like a tank with a 5 cyl diesel engine. I finally sold it after getting tired of chasing down vacuum leaks.

  35. #1470
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Location
    St. Helens, Oregon
    Posts
    4,652

    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    OH MAN! That brings back some fonds I had a 550 SS that was my favorite bike. The 400 was more nimble, but the 550 was super stable at speed...and I was inclined to use it.

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