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Thread: Skookum Maru

  1. #1611
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Chris - I too use an iPhone 12Pro for 90% of what I snap / film - an amazing piece of kit. I'm not embarrassed to say the 12pro is a better photographer than I am, some days I look at the photo and ask myself "where did that come from" :-)
    "Old boats are like teenage girlfriends: there is a certain urgency to their needs & one neglects them at one's peril"


  2. #1612
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Quote Originally Posted by snow(Alan H) View Post
    Chris - I too use an iPhone 12Pro for 90% of what I snap / film - an amazing piece of kit. I'm not embarrassed to say the 12pro is a better photographer than I am, some days I look at the photo and ask myself "where did that come from" :-)
    Exactly. I’m usually surprised at how good the photos turn out, which I figure is a sure sign that it’s the camera doing the work, not the photographer!
    - Chris

    Any single boat project will always expand to encompass the set of all possible boat projects.

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  3. #1613
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Thanks for this photo essay, Chris! I'm not much for festivals in general, but you've made a very strong case for the WBF. Maybe next year...

    - James

  4. #1614
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Quote Originally Posted by Garret View Post
    I've enjoyed the WB Shows & have been to 'em in Mystic, Rockland, & Newport (including having Neoga @ Newport twice) - but the festival in PT takes it to whole 'nother level.
    One difference I feel between Mystic and Port Townsend: PT isn't at all museum-oriented. All the boats are currently sailed. Down the street from the show, Boat Haven is a center of amazing wood boat construction and reconstruction (Pacific Flyer and Tally Ho just two recent projects there). The Northwest School of Wooden Boatbuilding is about 10 miles away and is part of the same spirit, not static and staid at all.

  5. #1615
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Thank you, Chris, for this whole thread. your description of being a lad and hanging out and working at various boat shops etc. pulled up some memories of my own. I was in high school in Hawaii in 1960 and had a newspaper route. One of my customers was The Anchorage, Kaneohe Bay Marina, built and owned by Laurie Dowsett. I spent a lot of my spare time there and he eventually gave me a job as gofer, gas jockey, scrape and paint bottoms (of boats!) and whatever else a kid could do. I still don't know why he took me on but am thankful to him for doing so.

    I've been to one PTWBF, back when I lived in Oregon. I would dearly like to go to another but distance and other commitments prohibit that. So thank you again for the lovely photos and descriptions of the festival!

  6. #1616
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Quote Originally Posted by _QB_ View Post
    One difference I feel between Mystic and Port Townsend: PT isn't at all museum-oriented. All the boats are currently sailed. Down the street from the show, Boat Haven is a center of amazing wood boat construction and reconstruction (Pacific Flyer and Tally Ho just two recent projects there). The Northwest School of Wooden Boatbuilding is about 10 miles away and is part of the same spirit, not static and staid at all.
    True - but even the shows @ Newport (major yachting center & nothing museum-like about it) & Rockland (working town - home of many fishermen & ferries) didn't have the atmosphere that PT has. More reserved, less exuberant - but then maybe that's New England vs the PNW?
    "If it ain't broke, you're not trying." - Red Green

  7. #1617
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Quote Originally Posted by pez_leon View Post
    Thanks for this photo essay, Chris! I'm not much for festivals in general, but you've made a very strong case for the WBF. Maybe next year...

    - James
    Don't tell anyone, but I am famously antisocial. To the point where my wife feels compelled to coach me in social settings. On any normal day I would never voluntarily join a large group of random people but I enjoyed every minute of the PTWBF. It's absolutely worth doing.

    Quote Originally Posted by _QB_ View Post
    One difference I feel between Mystic and Port Townsend: PT isn't at all museum-oriented. All the boats are currently sailed. Down the street from the show, Boat Haven is a center of amazing wood boat construction and reconstruction (Pacific Flyer and Tally Ho just two recent projects there). The Northwest School of Wooden Boatbuilding is about 10 miles away and is part of the same spirit, not static and staid at all.
    I haven't been to Mystic or any of the other East Coast shows, but I suspect there is something to this thought. There is a lot more emphasis on using and enjoying boats and less on heritage out here. To the point where sometimes I wish we did put some more effort into preserving that heritage. But given the choice I suppose I'd rather be on the water than in a museum. The Center for Wooden Boats is far more interesting as a working boat livery than as a museum with a selection of traditional small craft on display, and the NWMC would be nowhere near as vital without R2AK, Seventy48 and the other events that they support.

    Quote Originally Posted by Winter Hawk View Post
    Thank you, Chris, for this whole thread. your description of being a lad and hanging out and working at various boat shops etc. pulled up some memories of my own. I was in high school in Hawaii in 1960 and had a newspaper route. One of my customers was The Anchorage, Kaneohe Bay Marina, built and owned by Laurie Dowsett. I spent a lot of my spare time there and he eventually gave me a job as gofer, gas jockey, scrape and paint bottoms (of boats!) and whatever else a kid could do. I still don't know why he took me on but am thankful to him for doing so.

    I've been to one PTWBF, back when I lived in Oregon. I would dearly like to go to another but distance and other commitments prohibit that. So thank you again for the lovely photos and descriptions of the festival!
    We have so many stories like that in this group! We need to start a thread just to capture some of them. I could relate how I almost landed a position as a deck hand on a yacht that was cruising around the world, and how it all went badly in the end due to a bad sunburn. Or the summer I spent working at a boat yard in rural Maryland, which ended when I witnessed the blatant racism of the yard manager and quit in protest. And always the water and the boats - whether aboard a mega yacht on the Potomac, a deadrise on the Maryland Eastern Shore or sailing an El Toro on Lake Union in Seattle.

    Quote Originally Posted by Garret View Post
    True - but even the shows @ Newport (major yachting center & nothing museum-like about it) & Rockland (working town - home of many fishermen & ferries) didn't have the atmosphere that PT has. More reserved, less exuberant - but then maybe that's New England vs the PNW?
    On the other hand, the working waterfront is still very much alive out there. One of my favorite experiences in Maine was watching the lobster boats at the co-op dock in Islesford, loading traps and heading out in the morning or coming back at the end of the day. I got to see some of the best boat handlers in the world and plenty of wooden boats doing exactly what they were designed to do.
    - Chris

    Any single boat project will always expand to encompass the set of all possible boat projects.

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  8. #1618
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Quote Originally Posted by snow(Alan H) View Post
    wow that was a great photo essay - many thanks for sharing. Can I ask what you use camera/phone for the photos?
    kind regards Alan - in Auckland NZ
    The iphone is hard to beat. Being a wooden boat guy, I like things that are mildly anachronistic. I use two different digital cameras with actual lenses.

    One is an old Nikon DSLR that I acquired on Craigslist for $100, it is for more formal pics, like the pedal boat. The other is a Nikon point and shoot, also with a lens, that I just pull out on the spur of the moment.

    I figure that I'll use them more if I'm not worried about dropping them in the water!
    Tales from the land and sea: http://terrapintales.wordpress.com/

  9. #1619
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Quote Originally Posted by cstevens View Post
    There is a lot more emphasis on using and enjoying boats and less on heritage out here. To the point where sometimes I wish we did put some more effort into preserving that heritage. But given the choice I suppose I'd rather be on the water than in a museum. The Center for Wooden Boats is far more interesting as a working boat livery than as a museum with a selection of traditional small craft on display, and the NWMC would be nowhere near as vital without R2AK, Seventy48 and the other events that they support.
    The west is all about reinvention. Sometimes too much so. At any rate, there's a new-ish group that has been working on celebrating NW maritime heritage. Here's some info:

    Spanning 3,000 miles of Washington State’s saltwater shoreline, the new Maritime Washington National Heritage Area recognizes our state’s unique and diverse maritime cultures. Managed by the Washington Trust for Historic Preservation in partnership with the National Park Service, this heritage area builds a region-wide network and increases collaboration to support our coastal communities in celebrating, maintaining, and sharing their water-based stories.
    Tales from the land and sea: http://terrapintales.wordpress.com/

  10. #1620
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Speaking as a former west coast shipwright, I think we’ve done extraordinary well. The west coast has the oldest active fishing fleet in the world, and many of the older yachts still active. I regularly worked on active fishing vessels that predated nearly every Grand Banks schooner. A huge amount of the west coast fleet is much older than existing east coast boats, and the continuation of the trades that maintain them is nearly unbroken. I think that holds incalculable value. I was taught to plank by someone who learned in a shop building commercial seiners. I was taught to cork by guys who joined a union as caulkers. I’d argue that the west coast stuck it out way longer.
    sorry for the rant, it’s a bit of a close issue

  11. #1621
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Quote Originally Posted by Bruce Bateau View Post
    The west is all about reinvention. Sometimes too much so. At any rate, there's a new-ish group that has been working on celebrating NW maritime heritage. Here's some info:


    Spanning 3,000 miles of Washington State’s saltwater shoreline, the new Maritime Washington National Heritage Area recognizes our state’s unique and diverse maritime cultures. Managed by the Washington Trust for Historic Preservation in partnership with the National Park Service, this heritage area builds a region-wide network and increases collaboration to support our coastal communities in celebrating, maintaining, and sharing their water-based stories.

    Thanks for that info Bruce. I hadn't see it before. I will say that it seems like an administrative effort more than actual preservation or heritage, but I suppose that the one leads to the other. It does seem to be supported by a list of all the organizations one would want to have on board.


    Quote Originally Posted by Pelirrojo View Post
    Speaking as a former west coast shipwright, I think we’ve done extraordinary well. The west coast has the oldest active fishing fleet in the world, and many of the older yachts still active. I regularly worked on active fishing vessels that predated nearly every Grand Banks schooner. A huge amount of the west coast fleet is much older than existing east coast boats, and the continuation of the trades that maintain them is nearly unbroken. I think that holds incalculable value. I was taught to plank by someone who learned in a shop building commercial seiners. I was taught to cork by guys who joined a union as caulkers. I’d argue that the west coast stuck it out way longer.
    sorry for the rant, it’s a bit of a close issue
    I agree entirely. There are still plenty of boats in the working fleet that were built in the first half of the twentieth century. And there are certainly more skilled craftspeople and resources for wooden boats here than just about anywhere else. I would much rather be caring for an older boat here than in any other part of the country. I see that P.T. Shipwrights and John Thomas are both actively hiring, which I think is a good sign. But at the same time I don't think the thread of our maritime history is as strong here as it is on the East Coast, nor has there been as much effort to preserve it in any fashion.

    That much of our maritime heritage is still in active use is a great thing, but to my knowledge we have little or no resources devoted to preserving any of those boats once their active life, working or recreational, is done. The CWB does have some local small craft, and Northwest Seaport has Tordenskjold, Arthur Foss and The Swiftsure lightship but they seem to always be on the edge of viability and funding. (Let's not even talk about the decades-long Wawona debacle). And what about the troller Twilight in their collection? She isn't even mentioned on the website, and as best I can gather she is stored somewhere in Port Townsend now.

    Looking at the CWB, here's a perfect example of what I'm talking about. They have a current exhibit on "Historic Small Craft of the Pacific Northwest" which features the following: a George Pocock rowing wherry, a Hvalsoe 13, an International 14 sailing dinghy, a Lake Oswego boat, a Willits canoe, an Old Town double end boat, a Cama Skiff, a McCurdy Dory, and a Reinell Dinghy. Of that list, one is a modern design (meaning no slight to Eric H., whose boats are wonderful examples of the art, but they are not "historic"), one is a British design, and one is from Maine. No Poulsbo boat. Nothing from Monk or Blanchard or Garden. Nothing from B.C. - no handliner even. And where is the pre-European settlement heritage represented? Canada does a far better job of preserving and honoring the First Nations maritime history than we do down here.

    I want to see an exhibit on the contribution of Japanese and Scandinavian boatbuilders to PNW traditional craft. I want to see a *real* history of local boat designs and boat building. I want to see a permanent exhibit on of Native American fishing techniques and boats. I want to see an exhibit on Tollycraft, Reinell, Uniflite, Bell Boy, Skagit and the mid-century pleasure craft renaissance here (even if many of them are fiberglass). And why is Glory of the Seas up on Lopez Island with a plywood patch on her hull and not sitting on Lake Union with pride of place at NW Seaport? I'm glad someone is trying to keep her afloat but it's an embarrassment that it's being left to a private individual. She may not be truly historic, but she is certainly a direct link to the tradition of ship building in this area.

    Perhaps most damning of all, what are we doing to preserve even the smallest piece of our historic working waterfront? Where is our Mystic Seaport? Jensen is gone. Vic Franck is gone. Doc Freeman's is gone. F.V.O is gone. Foss is gone. Marco is gone. If I wanted to learn about the maritime history of the PNW right now I would have to go to two dozen different sources, most of them private, most of them just old guys with a bunch of stories to tell - stories that will be lost in the next decade or two.

    Ah - I didn't mean to start ranting though. It's not like I'm out there making any of these things happen myself. I just miss a lot of what is gone now. I try to imagine it back into existence sometimes. The smell of paint and tar and creosote in the yard, and the way the air felt on a summer night on the lake, and the rotten old Poulsbo boat filled with rain water that I bailed out all one long afternoon so I could imagine untying it and somehow starting it's rusty engine. The light on the inside of the boat shed at Jensen, or wandering the aisles at Doc Freeman's looking at shelf after shelf of intricate bronze fittings and hardware.

    On the other hand, it is possible that I have just had one too many glasses of wine before dinner. Time to leave off this rambling post and start cooking.
    - Chris

    Any single boat project will always expand to encompass the set of all possible boat projects.

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  12. #1622
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    I thought more about my concept of the festival as a river of stories and penned an article over at 48N Magazine. I hope this provides another perspective and some fun for folks who couldn't make it.
    Tales from the land and sea: http://terrapintales.wordpress.com/

  13. #1623
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Quote Originally Posted by Bruce Bateau View Post
    I thought more about my concept of the festival as a river of stories and penned an article over at 48N Magazine. I hope this provides another perspective and some fun for folks who couldn't make it.
    Hey! I just finished reading it earlier this evening Bruce. A great description of the entire weekend. Thanks for posting it.

    https://48north.com/lifestyle/wooden...er-of-stories/
    - Chris

    Any single boat project will always expand to encompass the set of all possible boat projects.

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  14. #1624
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Thanks for that Bruce! A great reminder of what the Festival is al about...yes, there are boats, but the people who make, use and care for them is the ultimate focus.

  15. #1625
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Summer is not quite finished here in the PNW, but I can feel the first hints of autumn in the morning chill and in the slant of the late-afternoon sun. We have plans to cruise a bit this fall but first we have to navigate school camping trips, soccer games, unavoidable East Coast travel and other obligations and trials. And tackle a few boat projects while we still have the weather for it. The major job for this year is deck and cabin top paint. So I spent the day cleaning the boat, removing the solar panels, moving the dinghy to the shop and similar tasks in preparation for starting work tomorrow.









    It was a good day for boat projects. Also a good day to just sit on the bow watching the boats go by. So there was some sitting done as well.

    - Chris

    Any single boat project will always expand to encompass the set of all possible boat projects.

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  16. #1626
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Looking for a color for my soon to be painted foredeck. That looks nice. Is that mast buff?

  17. #1627
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Chris, agreed about your point on Seattle’s working waterfront, I bought some of the equipment and tools out of the Foss shipyard and it felt like I was robbing a friends grave when I pulled it out. Word is that Gompers is closing too, so pretty much between that and all the yards closing down there likely will never be another generation of Lake union shipwrights.

    Nicholas

  18. #1628
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Quote Originally Posted by ron ll View Post
    Looking for a color for my soon to be painted foredeck. That looks nice. Is that mast buff?
    I'm looking at paint colors too. We've been using Epifanes Yacht Enamel:



    I don't know exactly what color is on Skookum Maru (Paul may know?) but there are at least two, maybe three different shades of buff between the pilot house top, aft cabin and decks right now. An unopened can of Epifanes #4 Buff came with the boat so I have been intending to use that. However I've been looking at photos of Topaz today and I really like the ivory accent color she has.



    So now I'm leaning toward the #210 Antique Ivory instead, as it seems closest. If we do go with that option you are welcome to the can of buff paint. I think that color would look really nice on Snoose.

    Quote Originally Posted by Pelirrojo View Post
    Chris, agreed about your point on Seattle’s working waterfront, I bought some of the equipment and tools out of the Foss shipyard and it felt like I was robbing a friends grave when I pulled it out. Word is that Gompers is closing too, so pretty much between that and all the yards closing down there likely will never be another generation of Lake union shipwrights.

    Nicholas
    There's still Pacific Fishermen and Lake Union Dry Dock I guess, but I don't know how much longer either of those places will last. Seems inevitable that they will follow all the others, and either close up shop or move out of Seattle. Ewing Street too. I expect that it will go away once Mike W. is no longer able to keep it going, although he has a collection that would make a great museum on its own. So it goes. I'm just going to enjoy the time we have left as best I can.
    - Chris

    Any single boat project will always expand to encompass the set of all possible boat projects.

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  19. #1629
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Quote Originally Posted by cstevens View Post
    I don't know exactly what color is on Skookum Maru (Paul may know?)
    I don't know. Applied by previous owners. Might be noted in Asia's maintenance log (which I thought I had scanned, but I can't find it at the moment).

    An unopened can of Epifanes #4 Buff came with the boat so I have been intending to use that.
    I was thinking to use that for the false stack. IMHO it would go well with the brown cap, and be an improvement over the fleshy sort-of-pink that's there now. But (obviously!) never got around to that.

    However I've been looking at photos of Topaz today and I really like the ivory accent color she has. So now I'm leaning toward the #210 Antique Ivory instead, as it seems closest.
    Interesting to look at the Monk/Rogers original Painting Color Schedule for Skookum Maru. Canvas Decks: Ivory Interlux #224! Great minds think alike.

    SMPaintingColorSchedule.jpg

  20. #1630
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    That painting schedule is a nice find Paul - thanks! I expect I have it somewhere in the files you gave me but I hadn't encountered it yet. I also see that the stack was originally white. That's what I'm planning as well, although with a black top like Topaz.
    - Chris

    Any single boat project will always expand to encompass the set of all possible boat projects.

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  21. #1631
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    We started in on paint prep for the decks today. I'm working with a professional painter, although not the high-end guy who did the beautiful job on the topsides a couple of years ago. Eventually I do want to strip the decks all the way back and start over but right now my goal is just to seal things up. A simple enough project, but right off we are facing a couple of questions.


    1. What to do about the non-skid? I don't want to sand it off and start over right now, and there doesn't seem much point in sanding it in preparation for another coat of paint. What do people usually do here? The old finish doesn't have much gloss left. Should we just paint over it the way it is? It might not hold up as long as a proper job but if we can get a few years out of it before we have to start over that would be fine.


    2. At some point in the past a non-hardening painter's caulk was used to fill some joints and a few dings. We are encountering it as we scrape cracked and peeling sections of paint back to a good edge. I'm inclined to take it out where we find it and fill with epoxy filler or a polyurethane sealer as appropriate but what is the recommended practice here?


    Thanks for any advice!
    - Chris

    Any single boat project will always expand to encompass the set of all possible boat projects.

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  22. #1632
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Painting over non-skid reduces the "non" part - sometimes significantly if the original is old.

    I use the white 3M glazing compound for really small stuff as it dries in minutes & sands nicely. However it's only for max 1/8" deep or so - even that requires a couple of coats. Otherwise - yep - epoxy with micro-balloons or similar fairing powder.
    "If it ain't broke, you're not trying." - Red Green

  23. #1633
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Re the decks: Are you thinking about considering non-skid at all? Original covering was canvas, current fiberglass maybe has less texture...?

    Re the stack: the indigenous fish + Hokusai wave symbol was designed by the Asia's and I kind of liked it, but maybe it's time to come up with your own!

  24. #1634
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Quote Originally Posted by Garret View Post
    Painting over non-skid reduces the "non" part - sometimes significantly if the original is old.

    I use the white 3M glazing compound for really small stuff as it dries in minutes & sands nicely. However it's only for max 1/8" deep or so - even that requires a couple of coats. Otherwise - yep - epoxy with micro-balloons or similar fairing powder.
    Yes, I'm expecting that there will be somewhat less "non" and a bit more "skid" after this paint job. I think it will be ok for now though, and will let me push the full strip-and-repaint project a few years farther down the road.

    I've used West epoxy and 410 microballoons for spot filling in the past, and also 3M Marine Filler. Both seem to work well and are easy to use. But my main question is what to use along sharp joints, like the edge of the molding where the deck meets the bulwarks and cabin sides.



    There is a bead of soft caulk along the edges right now, and the paint is cracking all along it. I'd like to replace it, and am thinking of something like 3M 4200 that would dry but remain flexible.

    Quote Originally Posted by _QB_ View Post
    Re the decks: Are you thinking about considering non-skid at all? Original covering was canvas, current fiberglass maybe has less texture...?

    Re the stack: the indigenous fish + Hokusai wave symbol was designed by the Asia's and I kind of liked it, but maybe it's time to come up with your own!
    I don't want to remove the non-skid entirely - I do think it's needed - I just don't want to redo it completely right now. I think the aft cabin top is still canvas, yes? It's coming up in a couple of spots. Replacing the canvas with fiberglass is another job that I want to do, and another reason I don't want to get into stripping the old paint yet off entirely yet. As for the symbol graphic, I'm still thinking about it. I'm going to paint over it now but may try to design a suitable replacement at some point.
    - Chris

    Any single boat project will always expand to encompass the set of all possible boat projects.

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  25. #1635
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Dunno if 4200 is paintable - 5200 sure isn't!

    Boatlife can be painted.
    "If it ain't broke, you're not trying." - Red Green

  26. #1636
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Quote Originally Posted by Garret View Post
    Dunno if 4200 is paintable - 5200 sure isn't!

    Boatlife can be painted.
    Ah! Yes, that’s what I needed. Somehow all the goop in a tube starts to seem interchangeable after a while and I forget what stuff is the right product for a given job. Boatlife is what I want. Ok then.
    - Chris

    Any single boat project will always expand to encompass the set of all possible boat projects.

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  27. #1637
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    More progress on the decks today. I pulled the dinghy davit off as it needs to be regalvanized, and found a few issues to deal with underneath. Some of which I knew about or was at least expecting.



    It turns out that the aft cabin is fiberglassed after all. But the glass is coming up under the top support for the davit. That issue is not helped by the thick pad of epoxy (?) that was added, I think to keep water from pooling in the crutch of the support arms. I may grind that pad off entirely and cut a drain channel under the support fitting instead. Any opinions on that plan, yea or nay? I need to do something there in any case.

    Then the next issue needing attention is at the base of the davit.



    Strangely, the bottom socket fitting for the davit was not through-bolted into the cabin side, it was just fastened with wood screws. Over time it has worked itself loose and there was quite a bit of movement in the socket fitting when the davit was rotated. That movement has caused the molding at the deck joint to come loose so that will need to be addressed. Really that molding needs to be refastened all around since the old ferrous nails are obviously failing, but that's a project for another day.

    The real problem that I need to deal with in this area, and that is shown in that photo, is that the outer layer of plywood on the cabin side is delaminating at the seam that runs below the windows. The problem runs for maybe six feet, and is also in the area of this other soft spot that I found a few weeks ago.



    So some surgery is in order here I think. Hopefully it just requires replacement of a section of the plywood here and not anything more significant.
    - Chris

    Any single boat project will always expand to encompass the set of all possible boat projects.

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  28. #1638
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    So I'm trying to convince myself not to grind and fill the fiberglass decks and cabin tops but I'm not really happy about it. This is what I have to deal with right now...



    That's from the aft cabin, which is the worst area, but the decks aren't much better. The top coat of paint is coming up and the existing non-skid makes it hard to get a good surface for new paint.



    And where there isn't non-skid, the original fiberglass surface is so uneven that it's just as bad.





    So what to do? The situation is not helped by the row of varnished wooden yachts that I walk past on the way to Skookum Maru, all with perfectly smooth decks and immaculate non-skid areas. I need to regularly remind myself that she's a cruising boat not a show queen.

    My goal is to get a good coat of paint on the decks that will adhere, look decent, and protect the underlying surface but I'm not convinced that I will be able to do that on top of what is there now. What to do? Stick with the plan and live with the results? Embark on a project to strip it all back and start over? Some as yet unknown middle path? Comments and suggestions requested. Assurances that it all will work out ok welcomed. Dour predictions of failure to be duly considered over a glass of bourbon and tears.
    - Chris

    Any single boat project will always expand to encompass the set of all possible boat projects.

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  29. #1639
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Well, my approach would be to strip, fair, paint/nonskid, it is so very nice when done well. However, the magnitude is not to be underestimated, its a lot of grinding (very careful grinding!) a lot of dust to deal with (a lot) and a lot of hours hunched over the deck. I see the things you point out, and maybe a couple years solution would be to abrade the existing (sort of a green scrubby on a disc; Festool sells them and I've done home-made versions) clean as best can, repair any acute leaks, and overcoat with a flat, no gloss when you do the nonskid. Flat will hide some of the bumpyness. I think you'll have to add nonskid to the new paint, using whatever method one prefers, otherwise looks like slippery as the texture is so filled in. Whilst doing all that, promise her how really nice she'll look when you get to the proper job? And she wont look bad in the meantime...
    Brian

  30. #1640
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Quote Originally Posted by Boatsbgood View Post
    Well, my approach would be to strip, fair, paint/nonskid, it is so very nice when done well. However, the magnitude is not to be underestimated, its a lot of grinding (very careful grinding!) a lot of dust to deal with (a lot) and a lot of hours hunched over the deck. I see the things you point out, and maybe a couple years solution would be to abrade the existing (sort of a green scrubby on a disc; Festool sells them and I've done home-made versions) clean as best can, repair any acute leaks, and overcoat with a flat, no gloss when you do the nonskid. Flat will hide some of the bumpyness. I think you'll have to add nonskid to the new paint, using whatever method one prefers, otherwise looks like slippery as the texture is so filled in. Whilst doing all that, promise her how really nice she'll look when you get to the proper job? And she wont look bad in the meantime...
    Brian
    That's what I'm thinking Brian. The right thing to do is to grind it smooth, fill as needed and start over but that will take weeks and there are other projects waiting so I'm looking for a "good enough" job now with the promise of a better one later. If I can get the existing surface prepped well enough for good adhesion I'd be ok with that but I was struggling to come up with the right technique. I hadn't thought about using a Scotch-Brite pad for prep though. I've used them on other things (varnish mostly) but it did not occur to me that it might be the solution here. I'm off to hunt for some 5" Scotch-Brite discs, or failing that some pads that I can use for a DIY disc or hand sanding. I'll let you know how it goes!
    - Chris

    Any single boat project will always expand to encompass the set of all possible boat projects.

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  31. #1641
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Nothing really gets nonskid ready for paint, I've tried several methods over the years. Good enough is going to have to be the goal...
    Are you allowed to pressure wash decks there? On the glassed surfaces its safe, and if it knocks a bit of the old paint off thats good, I figure. Maybe a last step before paint?

  32. #1642
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Quote Originally Posted by Boatsbgood View Post
    Nothing really gets nonskid ready for paint, I've tried several methods over the years. Good enough is going to have to be the goal...
    Are you allowed to pressure wash decks there? On the glassed surfaces its safe, and if it knocks a bit of the old paint off thats good, I figure. Maybe a last step before paint?

    Well the Scotch-Brite pad was exactly what I needed. I made a DIY abrasive disc using a large Scotch-Brite pad, a hook-and-loop sanding disc and contact cement, and after a few seconds of sanding my test patch looked like this:



    Much better. It's still never going to be a show quality job, but at least I think it will be a decent surface for paint. As for pressure washing, I could probably get away with it since I know they pressure wash the docks so I might do that as well. Thanks for the tips!
    - Chris

    Any single boat project will always expand to encompass the set of all possible boat projects.

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  33. #1643
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Quote Originally Posted by cstevens View Post
    Yes, I'm expecting that there will be somewhat less "non" and a bit more "skid" after this paint job. I think it will be ok for now though, and will let me push the full strip-and-repaint project a few years farther down the road.
    Following along without much to add, as usual, but a thought on the non-skid. I used the polycarbonate chips sold by Duckworks, they mix in with the paint so no top coat of paint. Mine have remained non-skiddley for a decade of tromping on. Your non-skid is probably sand or something, but if you used the poly chips in the paint used to overcoat it should leave a good a non-skid surface.

  34. #1644
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Considering the sensible goal here that looks good! As above, I'd put one of the plastic nonskid additives in the new paint (Awlgrip, International, others) to ensure grip, wouldnt be much extra work since you dont have glossy margins and areas divided by gloss strips. Mask edges and away you go. Somebody (international, Pettit?) makes a single pack paint with nonskid in it, though its not the cheapest stuff, neither are the additives cheap. And a pressure wash will get any loose stuff out of the way. Progress!

  35. #1645
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Quote Originally Posted by rgthom View Post
    Following along without much to add, as usual, but a thought on the non-skid. I used the polycarbonate chips sold by Duckworks, they mix in with the paint so no top coat of paint. Mine have remained non-skiddley for a decade of tromping on. Your non-skid is probably sand or something, but if you used the poly chips in the paint used to overcoat it should leave a good a non-skid surface.
    Quote Originally Posted by Boatsbgood View Post
    Considering the sensible goal here that looks good! As above, I'd put one of the plastic nonskid additives in the new paint (Awlgrip, International, others) to ensure grip, wouldnt be much extra work since you dont have glossy margins and areas divided by gloss strips. Mask edges and away you go. Somebody (international, Pettit?) makes a single pack paint with nonskid in it, though its not the cheapest stuff, neither are the additives cheap. And a pressure wash will get any loose stuff out of the way. Progress!
    Thanks Rick and Brian. To add some detail here, the test surface in my photo is actually the top of the aft cabin. The top of the pilothouse is similar. I'm not sure what is creating that texture. It doesn't seem to be a non-skid additive and it doesn't have much tooth to it. But in any case we don't walk on those surfaces all that often so I'm not as concerned about them being too slippery. The decks on the other hand do have a non-skid surface that was applied with a masked border. I don't know if adding more non-skid on top of what's there will work very well but I *think* there is enough tooth to it that it won't be too bad with one more coat of paint.

    Ultimately I do plan on stripping the old non-skid off entirely and starting over but that's a bigger project and I'd like to put it off for a couple of years at least. And if I can avoid adding more non-skid now that will make the future project easier so I'm hoping that it will all work out that way. We'll see.
    - Chris

    Any single boat project will always expand to encompass the set of all possible boat projects.

    Life is short. Go boating now!

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