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Thread: Skookum Maru

  1. #1261
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Spent some time last weekend wandering through Fisheries Supply, our local chandlery, looking for block and tackle hardware. The Wichard soft bocks I was originally planning on were out of stock. They have a line of teak and ash blocks from Davey & Co. but that would be gilding the silk lily made from the sows ear or something. Absurd for a boat hoist in any case. I definitely didn't want cheap hardware store metal blocks. Modern sailboat hardware would be entirely functional but not quite in keeping with the Ye Olde Tyme Bote Shedd ambiance I am going for. What to do?

    Of the hardware available these old school Tufnol blocks appealed to me. Very sixties-sailing-dinghy-cool, in a Frank Dye, Wanderer sort of way. (I am reading Ocean Crossing Wayfarer right now, which may be affecting my judgement about such things).



    However Fisheries only had one of the cam cleat fiddle blocks in stock and I needed two. Not ideal, but nothing else was working out so I bought what I could at the time and then ordered the missing fiddle block to come later, although given the shipping delays right now there is no telling when that might be.

    So at that point I had three-quarters of a working hoist. Just on a whim, I browsed craigslist for blocks thinking I might find something cheap I could use in the meantime and, amazingly, there was the exact block I needed for sale only a few blocks away from Skookum Maru! It was well-used but cheap, and it let me finish making up the second bock and tackle. Resulting in:



    Now I just need to pick up a couple of lifting straps and I will be able to get the rowing shell off of the ground.
    - Chris

    Any single boat project will always expand to encompass the set of all possible boat projects.

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  2. #1262
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Nice! Much more appropriate than the ubiquitous Horrid Freight electric winch I seem to see everywhere!

  3. #1263
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Quote Originally Posted by Hugh MacD View Post
    Nice! Much more appropriate than the ubiquitous Horrid Freight electric winch I seem to see everywhere!
    Thanks Hugh. Sometimes I feel silly spending so much time trying to come up with an aesthetically pleasing solution when I could just go to the nearest big box store and buy the cheap thing that most people would use. But then I remember that most people would have a practical plastic sea kayak, or an SUP, or an aluminum skiff instead of a collection of somewhat dodgy boats made from cellulose fiber, and then I feel much better about my life choices!
    - Chris

    Any single boat project will always expand to encompass the set of all possible boat projects.

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  4. #1264
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    I can relate to that affliction.
    -Jim

    Sucker for a pretty face.
    1934 27' Blanchard Cuiser ~ Amazon, Ex. Emalu
    19'6" Caledonia Yawl ~ Sparrow

    Getting into trouble one board at a time.

  5. #1265
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Yep +1 there.
    Being a sailor I have boxes of random blocks and rope, so my solution of the same problem was far more eclectic.
    The Wichard soft Blocks were waaay overkill by the way.

  6. #1266
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Quote Originally Posted by jsjpd1 View Post
    I can relate to that affliction.
    Yep. I think we are in good company there Jim. Plenty of cellulose boat addicts around these parts.

    Quote Originally Posted by Slacko View Post
    Yep +1 there.
    Being a sailor I have boxes of random blocks and rope, so my solution of the same problem was far more eclectic.
    The Wichard soft Blocks were waaay overkill by the way.
    Once upon a time I would have hunted through the odd parts bins of one of the many local used marine stores around here, and would have easily found an eclectic and appropriate set of blocks or other suitable hardware for this project. But those stores are all gone now. There are a couple left in the Puget Sound region but they are not close to Seattle and visiting them is a pilgrimage.

    A long time ago a friend and I took a day and drove the entire length of Puget Sound visiting every used marine store in the area. Back then there were a bunch of great places all filled with bronze hardware, wood blocks, antique stoves and all sorts of treasures. Just a memory now.
    - Chris

    Any single boat project will always expand to encompass the set of all possible boat projects.

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  7. #1267
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Chris - the locks are an adventure every time! I think we all have an embarrassing story related to locking through. Here’s mine:

    It was Memorial Day years ago. I had taken my Cal 34 to the south sound for the weekend and was motoring back later than I had anticipated. There were several hundred boats amassed waiting to lock through. It was mayhem…speed boats, power boats, yachts, sailboats, the Thea Foss (!), etc. We waited a few hours before being allowed to enter the locks, during that time we saw several minor collisions, an allision with the RR bridge abutment, and a guy fall in the water. People were sitting on the banks of the locks watching and picnicing. When we finally entered we were in the first row, third boat out. The first boat alongside the lock was a large powerboat with a yapping dog, a large man bellowing orders from the flybridge, and a wife tending lines on the bow. She was unsure how to secure the line and take up on it as the lock filled, he told her it’d be fine. It wasn’t fine…when they started filling the lock it pulled the boat off the side and we all swung out…I had fenders everywhere but still hit another sailboat. We all apologized and as the water calmed down and they started to open the lock to the ship canal I motored forward, second boat out of the lock. The engine started to sputter…I had checked the fuel tank earlier and still had 3” so I thought I was good. Wrong! I grabbed my gas can out of the lazerette and poured it into the fuel tank as I steered around other boats (the fuel fill was on the bottom of the cockpit). I made it back to my slip, tail between my legs, and had a good laugh!

    One thing you can’t anticipate is the skill level and knowledge of other folks out on the water…those kayakers should have known it’s not safe to get between a boat and an immovable object. That doesn’t make them lousy kayakers or bad people. It sounds like you did the right thing, minimized any damage, and learned from it. Good on ya!

  8. #1268
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Quote Originally Posted by Powerwagon View Post
    Chris - the locks are an adventure every time! I think we all have an embarrassing story related to locking through. Here’s mine:

    It was Memorial Day years ago. I had taken my Cal 34 to the south sound for the weekend and was motoring back later than I had anticipated. There were several hundred boats amassed waiting to lock through. It was mayhem…speed boats, power boats, yachts, sailboats, the Thea Foss (!), etc. We waited a few hours before being allowed to enter the locks, during that time we saw several minor collisions, an allision with the RR bridge abutment, and a guy fall in the water. People were sitting on the banks of the locks watching and picnicing. When we finally entered we were in the first row, third boat out. The first boat alongside the lock was a large powerboat with a yapping dog, a large man bellowing orders from the flybridge, and a wife tending lines on the bow. She was unsure how to secure the line and take up on it as the lock filled, he told her it’d be fine. It wasn’t fine…when they started filling the lock it pulled the boat off the side and we all swung out…I had fenders everywhere but still hit another sailboat. We all apologized and as the water calmed down and they started to open the lock to the ship canal I motored forward, second boat out of the lock. The engine started to sputter…I had checked the fuel tank earlier and still had 3” so I thought I was good. Wrong! I grabbed my gas can out of the lazerette and poured it into the fuel tank as I steered around other boats (the fuel fill was on the bottom of the cockpit). I made it back to my slip, tail between my legs, and had a good laugh!

    One thing you can’t anticipate is the skill level and knowledge of other folks out on the water…those kayakers should have known it’s not safe to get between a boat and an immovable object. That doesn’t make them lousy kayakers or bad people. It sounds like you did the right thing, minimized any damage, and learned from it. Good on ya!
    Ha! That is absolutely something I would do. I'd be steering with one knee while frantically searching for the deck fill key, dump half of the fuel all over myself and the cockpit, and arrive home stinking of diesel. I hope it wasn't as bad as I am imagining.

    Funny thing. I mentioned above that I am reading Ocean Crossing Wayfarer right now. Incredible story. Wanderer is an fantastic boat and the Dyes were amazing people. But what I mostly notice is that the narrative consists largely of all the things that went wrong, mistakes that were made, and the very fine line between completing the voyage and utter disaster. Which makes me think of all the other sea stories I have read, and I realize that most of them (perhaps excepting The Compleat Cruiser, which is almost smug in the expertise of its protagonists) are narratives of disaster or near disaster. Jack London wrote in Small-Boat Sailing about mooring on the edge of a drop off and nearly falling into it when the tide went out. Rockwell Kent is shipwrecked in N by E. John Steinbeck is beset by outboard motor problems in The Log from the Sea of Cortez. And so on.

    Of course, if nothing ever went wrong, what would there be to tell? There is little drama in the voyage that goes entirely to plan. And perhaps the lure of the sea is exactly that it is unpredictable. That things are bound to go wrong somewhere, and secretly we enjoy the challenge even if our goal is to avoid mishap. What I also notice about Frank Dye is that he treats all of the problems not as failures, but as opportunities to learn, improve, get better gear, make better decisions. And that he has a healthy fear of the sea and uses that fear as a prod to prepare, plan, train, be a better sailor. I have no desire to cruise the North Sea in a small dinghy, but I could still learn a few things from the Dyes.
    - Chris

    Any single boat project will always expand to encompass the set of all possible boat projects.

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  9. #1269
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Friday afternoon daydream... Don't think I've shared this one before:



    Chippewa. Elegant is a word that rarely comes to mind when looking at a tug boat but it's the only one that fits her. Judging from the photos she's been restored to yacht finish, or as close as one can get for an old work boat. And for sale, although at an "if you have to ask" price:

    https://seattle.craigslist.org/see/b...386379995.html

    In one of my alternate lives I would be living on a boat like this, migrating from harbor to harbor between Mexico and Alaska depending on whim, weather, and the season. Plenty of room for the whole family including the dogs. Enough space to set up a home office, a small workshop, and whatever else we needed. And the price is a little eye watering, but still a fraction of the cost of an equivalent fiberglass boat. Or a house for that matter. I wonder how much equity we could get out of ours if we sold it? Hmmmm.
    - Chris

    Any single boat project will always expand to encompass the set of all possible boat projects.

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  10. #1270
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Quote Originally Posted by cstevens View Post
    Friday afternoon daydream... Don't think I've shared this one before:



    Chippewa. Elegant is a word that rarely comes to mind when looking at a tug boat but it's the only one that fits her. Judging from the photos she's been restored to yacht finish, or as close as one can get for an old work boat. And for sale, although at an "if you have to ask" price:

    https://seattle.craigslist.org/see/b...386379995.html

    In one of my alternate lives I would be living on a boat like this, migrating from harbor to harbor between Mexico and Alaska depending on whim, weather, and the season. Plenty of room for the whole family including the dogs. Enough space to set up a home office, a small workshop, and whatever else we needed. And the price is a little eye watering, but still a fraction of the cost of an equivalent fiberglass boat. Or a house for that matter. I wonder how much equity we could get out of ours if we sold it? Hmmmm.
    The price is completely reasonable, 1/3 the cost of any old house in CA. So $2M invested over 20 years, that is a scary maintenance budget but let's say most of the work is done for a while. Budget #30k/yr maintenance. Does it come with full tanks? That's another $30k if not. Still not bad, I could retire on that.

  11. #1271
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Quote Originally Posted by rgthom View Post
    The price is completely reasonable, 1/3 the cost of any old house in CA. So $2M invested over 20 years, that is a scary maintenance budget but let's say most of the work is done for a while. Budget #30k/yr maintenance. Does it come with full tanks? That's another $30k if not. Still not bad, I could retire on that.
    This is what I'm saying. But my wife insists that old wooden boats are not a sound investment. Which I can't really argue with considering how much of my income I've disposed of that way over the years we have been together. Ah well. Still, a nice Friday afternoon daydream.
    - Chris

    Any single boat project will always expand to encompass the set of all possible boat projects.

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  12. #1272
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Have you read “Trekka around the world”? It’s a great book but it is much as you said, there are some exciting adventures, lots of great places, interesting people, and opportunities to learn. My folks did a lot of ocean cruising in the 70s, they didn’t write any books but had some adventures!

    if I was a billionaire I’d spend a fortune repairing and saving all these great old wooden boats.

  13. #1273
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Chippewa is in fantastic shape. She's a steal at the price she is offered at. According to her current owner she still has the fuel capacity to make ocean passages. Structural she's absolutely top notch, John has taken care of her for years. Plus she has one of the coolest engines out there. I know the current owners regularly run her with just the two of them. Also with her new forward cabin she has a hell of a lot of room.

  14. #1274
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Quote Originally Posted by Pelirrojo View Post
    According to her current owner she still has the fuel capacity to make ocean passages.
    According to the craigslist ad, she has 8000 gallons fuel now. How much more was in the forward tanks I wonder.

    The engine room is really something in this walkthrough: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I6bI00fyDgs

    Video of that Washington diesel running: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bWzf-8-uD3o

    Quite a boat, this one.

  15. #1275
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Quote Originally Posted by Powerwagon View Post
    Have you read “Trekka around the world”? It’s a great book but it is much as you said, there are some exciting adventures, lots of great places, interesting people, and opportunities to learn. My folks did a lot of ocean cruising in the 70s, they didn’t write any books but had some adventures!

    if I was a billionaire I’d spend a fortune repairing and saving all these great old wooden boats.
    I read Trekka when I was a kid but it's definitely time for a re-read. Somehow, despite spending most of my life on the water, I never got the urge for ocean cruising. I expect that comes from the wealth of inshore cruising destinations around the Salish region, combined with more experience aboard power boats than with sailing. I do love sailing but it was always something to do for an afternoon, not a way to go places. And yes, if I had the resources I would love to rescue so many boats that need saving. Here's another one...



    Hesquiat. Originally built as a Canadian air force supply vessel and subsequently used as a fish packer/tender. Now moored in Bellingham. She was for sale for years up in B.C. then I heard that she was bought last year by someone in the US and moved to Anacortes, and then to Bellingham when they lost the Anacortes moorage. Now potentially for sale again. She's seriously big at 114' though. Her sister ship Kimsquit was also for sale, but was scrapped a few years ago. I expect that Hesquiat likely needs to be refastened and who knows what else, but what a great boat. I hope she avoids that fate.

    Quote Originally Posted by Pelirrojo View Post
    Chippewa is in fantastic shape. She's a steal at the price she is offered at. According to her current owner she still has the fuel capacity to make ocean passages. Structural she's absolutely top notch, John has taken care of her for years. Plus she has one of the coolest engines out there. I know the current owners regularly run her with just the two of them. Also with her new forward cabin she has a hell of a lot of room.
    Nicholas, you are not making it easy to keep Chippewa in the day dream category here! She really sounds perfect. But then I remind myself that years ago I had the perfect boat, Savona, and sold her in search of a more perfect boat. Or at least a larger one. So I bought Perihelion and that didn't go so well. So now that I have the perfect boat again in Skookum Maru my eye may wander, but my time and boat budget are committed to keeping her in the best condition I can.

    And speaking of Savona, here she is in a photo I took a few years ago:



    She was a great boat when I had her but she's even better now as her current owners keep her in show condition, with considerably more varnish than I ever wanted to deal with. But she really was the perfect boat for a single liveaboard. She was the first large boat I owned and I didn't really understand how well she was set up and maintained until I had other boats later and had to deal with all of their various shortcomings.

    To live aboard in comfort in the PNW you really need four things: Large windows to let in the light, good heating, a hot shower, and a comfortable place to sit and drink your coffee in the morning. Savona had everything but the shower when I bought her, and adding a shower was the first real boat project I ever did. I fabricated a plywood and fiberglass shower pan with a drain to a sump, added the plumbing, and rigged a curtain, and it served me well for several years. I had no idea what I was doing when I made it but I was aboard her back in June and that shower is still in place so I guess I did ok.


    Quote Originally Posted by _QB_ View Post
    According to the craigslist ad, she has 8000 gallons fuel now. How much more was in the forward tanks I wonder.

    The engine room is really something in this walkthrough: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I6bI00fyDgs

    Video of that Washington diesel running: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bWzf-8-uD3o

    Quite a boat, this one.
    She really is. There is also a time lapse video of the twenty minute engine start procedure on Facebook: https://fb.watch/8GHAkp6K5y/
    - Chris

    Any single boat project will always expand to encompass the set of all possible boat projects.

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  16. #1276
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    The issue I see with tug boats is the tug boats have huge engines to, well, tug things. Once they're converted to cruisers they have way more engine than they need to move the boat. Fuel consumption would be an issue as well as the size of the engine room
    Elect a clown expect a circus

  17. #1277
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Quote Originally Posted by Bobcat View Post
    The issue I see with tug boats is the tug boats have huge engines to, well, tug things. Once they're converted to cruisers they have way more engine than they need to move the boat. Fuel consumption would be an issue as well as the size of the engine room
    Certainly true, but I’d also say that at 83’, the scale of things is going to be several times what you and I are used to with our (relatively) little boats. Fuel costs will vanish in comparison to a haulout for bottom paint and replacing the zincs!
    - Chris

    Any single boat project will always expand to encompass the set of all possible boat projects.

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  18. #1278
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Quote Originally Posted by cstevens View Post
    Certainly true, but I’d also say that at 83’, the scale of things is going to be several times what you and I are used to with our (relatively) little boats. Fuel costs will vanish in comparison to a haulout for bottom paint and replacing the zincs!
    So true. I don't want to think of the acres of bottom that would need to be painted
    Elect a clown expect a circus

  19. #1279
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Well at any rate, back here in reality I made some progress on my boat hoist today. Lifting straps and a few other bits completed the rigging. Now to try it out:



    Works great, except that as I expected the length of the rigged block and tackle means that the boat can't be lifted all that high:



    This is where the Wichard soft blocks would have been handy, as they take up far less room than traditional blocks. I could have also saved room by not using fiddle blocks, or by using eye bolts instead of straps to hang the tackle from the beam. But it doesn't really matter because I wasn't planning to hang the shell from the hoist in any case - it's just needed to get it high enough that I can tie the boat up to the beam using lashing straps:





    It's not exactly pull-the-string simple, but with a little practice and after working out a suitable routine I found that it was easy enough to hoist the shell, rig the lashing straps, and then use them to pull the boat up to the beam and out of the way. I don't entirely love the way the straps run right now though so I have some other ideas there but I think it will work fine in the end. Now I just need to cut down the shelf across the back of the garage so that I can lift the boat all the way up.
    - Chris

    Any single boat project will always expand to encompass the set of all possible boat projects.

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  20. #1280
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Quote Originally Posted by cstevens View Post
    There is also a time lapse video of the twenty minute engine start procedure on Facebook: https://fb.watch/8GHAkp6K5y/
    Direct reversing, from the ad copy. I would like to see a video of that! (Hopefully it doesn't take 20 minutes.) Interesting docking adventures await.

  21. #1281
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Hesquiat is such a cool boat hopefully it voids the fate of most of these big packers.

  22. #1282
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Quote Originally Posted by _QB_ View Post
    Direct reversing, from the ad copy. I would like to see a video of that! (Hopefully it doesn't take 20 minutes.) Interesting docking adventures await.
    A few years ago someone - I think it was Ron L. - posted a description of a big direct reversing tug docking in Olympia for the workboat show. If I recall correctly, the captain asked for “one turn in reverse” to ease the boat into a tight slip. The idea of docking by single propeller revolutions is an entirely different level of skill!

    Quote Originally Posted by Penta2 View Post
    Hesquiat is such a cool boat hopefully it voids the fate of most of these big packers.
    I hope so too, but also have to acknowledge that the world doesn’t have much use for big old wooden work boats on this scale. The Alaska cruise business is maybe the only place for them any longer and I imagine that the economics of that are tricky at best.
    - Chris

    Any single boat project will always expand to encompass the set of all possible boat projects.

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  23. #1283
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Galene, the 100’ Miki that moors at the foot of Stoneway on Lake Union is a regular at the (pre-pandemic) annual tug boat fest in Olympia. She is direct reversing, and altho I forget the actual times involved, reversing involves shutting down, moving the camshaft, and re air starting in reverse. Neutral is only with an engine shut down. In the first few years we participated in the festival, Snoose’s regular spot was immediately aft of Galene. After a couple of close docking situations, we started opting for the other side of the dock.

    One of the last times we were at the festival, Galene needed to back out of the waterway to participate in the race. Tide was low so there was very little water under her massive prop. This affected her prop walk steerage, so she needed to back and fill several times to back out of the narrow waterway. During one of the re-start reverses she found she was out of air to start and the incoming tide was pushing her toward the marina. She eventually drifted to rest with her bow against a 45’ sailboat while she waited to build enough air for a start. Not pretty. The sailboat owner, wife and young daughter were picnicking in the cockpit. They fled to the dock and watched in horror as the massive bow approached. I heard that the sailboat suffered some fiberglass fractures, not sure to what extent.

    I also can watch Maris Pearl, another direct drive tug, come into her slip at Shilshole. She shuts down about three docks from her slip and drifts to her dock dead slow. Timing is everything.

    Chippewa is beautiful but I don’t think I could afford the liability insurance let alone the bottom paint.

  24. #1284
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Timing is everything
    Indeed! I will never again complain about the challenges of maneuvering a single screw boat. Skookum Maru is a sports car compared to Galene or Maris Pearl. And a reversing routine that consists of "Shut down the engine, move the cam, re-start, and hope there is enough air in the tanks" would have me white-haired before my time. (My wife will tell you that is already happening, but I am in denial).

    I got to use one of my favorite parts of Skookum Maru this morning, the standing headroom workbench in the engine room...



    ...to make a widget.





    The widget is for the Dickinson stove:



    The fuel meter on the stove is supposed to be calibrated for the fuel (kerosene, stove oil or diesel) by adjusting the height of the needle using an allen wrench on the adjusting screw. But as I have been changing fuels somewhat often, and because the biodiesel I have been using most of the time doesn't always burn consistently, I have been fiddling with the adjustment on a constant basis. I had been just leaving the allen wrench in place but that solution was annoying and unsightly. Hence the widget, which lets me adjust the flow rate with a twiddle of the thumb and fingers instead. Much better. I'd like to find a flat thumb wheel to replace the lock nut but so far I have not found a suitable piece. Might have to make one at some point but this will do for now.
    - Chris

    Any single boat project will always expand to encompass the set of all possible boat projects.

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  25. #1285
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Widget building is one of the best things out there.


    Do you know what the difference between a professional and an expert is?

    A Professional has the right tool for the job.
    An Expert knows how to make do with what's available.

    (just for the record, that's not intended as a negative statement toward anyone)


    Expert widget making there Chris.
    There's the plan, then there's what actually happens.

    Ben Sebens, RN

    15' Welsford Navigator Inconceivable
    16' W. Simmons Mattinicus double ender ​Matty

  26. #1286
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Quote Originally Posted by BBSebens View Post
    Widget building is one of the best things out there.


    Do you know what the difference between a professional and an expert is?

    A Professional has the right tool for the job.
    An Expert knows how to make do with what's available.

    (just for the record, that's not intended as a negative statement toward anyone)


    Expert widget making there Chris.
    Thanks Ben. Funny, as I was hack-sawing stainless 8-32 threaded rod to make my widget I was wishing I had a metal lathe and the skill to use it so I could just turn up a suitable thumb screw from brass, and a knurled lock nut to go with it. That's what a professional would do. But I'm just a bodger and I am happy with what I was able to assemble from hardware store bits and the tools I have on hand. It will do. But really I think Dickinson should engineer a part for this purpose. Although I suppose they probably don't want people messing about with the calibration the way I am.
    - Chris

    Any single boat project will always expand to encompass the set of all possible boat projects.

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  27. #1287
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    I like that workshop, Chris. You 'may' want to check out the furniture part / hobby part drawers in your local hardware or big-box store to find a part for your jam-nut, you mention it is 8-32, that is one of the common sizes for electrical fasteners, I believe



    Rick

  28. #1288
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Hey Chris, I think that a photo of Skookum Maru is in this Seattle times article.https://www.seattletimes.com/sponsor...side-getaways/. The articles thumbnail kept popping up places.

  29. #1289
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Quote Originally Posted by hawkeye54 View Post
    I like that workshop, Chris. You 'may' want to check out the furniture part / hobby part drawers in your local hardware or big-box store to find a part for your jam-nut, you mention it is 8-32, that is one of the common sizes for electrical fasteners, I believe



    Rick
    Good thought Rick. A little wandering the aisles in the right place will probably turn something up. I have a picture in my head of what I want. I’m sure it exists. Just not sure where yet. I’m in Baltimore visiting my mother for the next few days though. More boat work, and fall cruising plans, when I get back.

    Quote Originally Posted by Pelirrojo View Post
    Hey Chris, I think that a photo of Skookum Maru is in this Seattle times article.https://www.seattletimes.com/sponsor...side-getaways/. The articles thumbnail kept popping up places.
    Ha! Nice photo. Sure looks like Skookum Maru but it’s actually the very similar but much younger and much, much larger Topaz. Topaz is by Ed Monk Jr. and is easily mistaken for Skookum Maru but at 52’ she’s on a different scale entirely.
    - Chris

    Any single boat project will always expand to encompass the set of all possible boat projects.

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  30. #1290
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    I'm in Baltimore for a few days visiting my mother and sister so am away from boats for a bit. But I did have a chance to go through a stack of old photos and found a few wooden boat pictures from the early 80s that I had forgotten about.

    My mother's Lowell Skiff. Just a great, practical boat for rowing or a small outboard. We towed it as a tender to St. Brendan, the 40' Matthews we lived aboard. It was donated to the Center for Wooden Boats when we moved to Baltimore in 1983 but it has vanished since then.



    The flatiron skiff that I had for a while. It was replaced with an El Toro sailing dinghy but I wish I still had it. Another great do-anything skiff. I think this photo was taken during the annual wooden boat show at the Center for Wooden Boats.



    My sister Kate and I rowing ashore in Active Cove, Patos Island.



    Dad and my sister in the Lowell Skiff with Seagull outboard.



    St. Brendan in Portage Bay, Seattle.



    St. Brendan is still around. She was restored a while back and is in very nice shape now. I went aboard her at a boat show a couple of years ago and had a very nostalgic tour. She took us to Port Townsend, the San Juans Islands, Victoria B.C., Princess Louisa Inlet and many other harbors in the years we lived aboard. A great boat.
    - Chris

    Any single boat project will always expand to encompass the set of all possible boat projects.

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  31. #1291
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Great find, Chris! Thanks for sharing those!

  32. #1292
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Great pictures there, Chris. While you are in Baltimore, check to see if there are 'heritage' hardware stores you might browse.





    Rick

  33. #1293
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    Default

    Those are great photos, and I am a bit jealous of your childhood! My vessel, growing up near Seattle in the late 60s early 70s, was a green rubber raft. I took that thing everywhere, on the fishing lakes, down the rivers, out on the sound, and across Neah Bay on a calm day. It fit in the back of my Rambler station wagon.

  34. #1294
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Thanks everyone. Mom and I had a great time looking at old photos together. Lots of good memories. I've told some stories of growing up on boats here and there on the forum but maybe someday I should create a thread to collect them all. I have a copy of the log from those years on St. Brendan and excerpts from it would be interesting reading as well.

    In truth I didn't know much about boats at all until I was eleven or so. Dad was the captain of the Boston to Cape Cod ferry when he and Mom met, and then he had an brief career in the navy, but we didn't have so much as a tin rowboat when I was growing up until my parents - in typical fashion - decided to sell their house, buy a boat, and move aboard at the beginning of 1980. (They were not the most practical people but that was entirely to my benefit as a kid).

    However I made up for my late introduction to maritime life by immersing myself in it. In short order I got a job sweeping floors for a nearby shipwright, and then as a stock boy and gofer for the Wooden Boat Shop, a much loved but now long gone Seattle chandlery. And I spent every moment on the water, in boat yards and sheds, and rowing or sailing or motoring a series of small prams and skiffs which I maintained myself, much to the amusement of the professionals. One summer I worked helping a family friend plank a cruising sailboat that he was building in his back yard.

    Like I said, good memories. And a lot more to come.
    - Chris

    Any single boat project will always expand to encompass the set of all possible boat projects.

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  35. #1295
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Back in rainy, cold Seattle and happy to be here. I'm looking forward to catching up on my boat maintenance to-do list, but first a digression back to the electric auxiliary notion that I floated last year. That project is somewhat down the priority list from a few other things, such as a long-anticipated kitchen remodel for the house (as my wife reminds me whenever my marine enthusiasms threaten to drive the pool of boating funds beyond its banks). But as the available technology for electric and solar propulsion continues to improve it does become ever more practical. As the recent addition of an electric drive to Ziska illustrates.

    Ziska, for any who are not familiar with her, is a sailing yacht "built in 1903 by Crossfield Brothers of Arnside, Cumbria, England, as a yacht to the lines of a traditional Morecambe Bay Prawner" as her Facebook page notes. She's 38' LOD and displaces around 24,000lbs, which makes her roughly comparable to Skookum Maru in size. She's also stunning.



    (Photo from the Ziska Facebook page, used with permission)

    Much more information about her and the electric drive are available from https://www.facebook.com/svZiska. She has spent the last 40+ years without any motor at all but the effort required to sweep her in and out of harbor on occasion has led her owner to add an unobtrusive Torqeedo pod drive. The installation is one of, if not the, best additions of an electric drive to a classic boat that I have encountered. The bronze throttle lever alone is worth seeing.



    (Photo from the Ziska Facebook page, used with permission)

    But what is even more interesting are the performance figures from her sea trials under electric power:



    (Image from the Ziska Facebook page, used with permission)

    Originally I had estimated around 11kW to push Skookum Maru at 5kts. However Ziska is drawing only about 7kW at 5kts. Ziska is a bit smaller and lighter than Skookum Maru but that figure is still around 25% less than the Gerr power calculation would indicate for her. YMMV, as the kids say, and these rough numbers are certainly not representative of real world power requirements for Skookum Maru, but I see them as further validation of the basic design parameters. Specs for the Ziska electric drive are:

    10kW Torqeedo pod drive
    15kW LMO-NMC battery bank
    2 x Torqeedo fast chargers

    They are seeing a recharge time from 26% to 100% of ~4 hours using grid power. I don't know if they have plans to add solar panels and I think that would be difficult to do well on a classic sailing yacht, but even so I think that's a usable setup for their purposes. They are expecting a range of around 50nm at 3kts. Which may be limited compared to diesel power but it seems entirely usable for harbor movements and making headway when the wind does not suit - as it frequently doesn't around here.

    It's worth noting that Ziska is a veteran of the R2AK unpowered race from Port Townsend to Ketchikan, Alaska. Her owner clearly has no problem sailing her without a motor. But the pod drive will make her more practical without, in my view, taking away anything from her history or nature. I'd love to do something similar for Skookum Maru someday.
    Last edited by cstevens; 10-29-2021 at 04:12 PM.
    - Chris

    Any single boat project will always expand to encompass the set of all possible boat projects.

    Life is short. Go boating now!

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