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Thread: Skookum Maru

  1. #1576
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Quote Originally Posted by cstevens View Post
    Skookum Maru isn't in the actual show though (I realize that I might not have been clear on that point in my earlier post).
    Yes I know. Probably just as well too, without a bunch of preparation. Apply by June 1. And make up signboards with basic construction details, quotes from the various publications about her, etc., so you don't have to repeat yourself ad infinitum.

    Anyway, obviously up to you if you ever want to do anything like that. A bunch of years ago I happened to be in PT the weekend before the festival. Walking the docks I saw a guy tidying up a nice wood sailboat. "Getting her ready for the big show?" I ask. "Hell no," he says. "I don't want a bunch of random people walking all over my boat. I'm fixing to get as far away from here as possible." It sounded like the voice of experience...

  2. #1577
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    We had our boat in the Wooden Boat Show 2 different years (both in Newport RI). With the exception of one jerk, really more just an idiot, everyone was polite & careful. We had some great conversations & met some good folks.

    Our one year at the PT WBF, we had the same positive experience, but from the other side. People were welcoming & friendly - especially a couple of Seaborn/Blanchard boats when they heard we are the caretakers of Neoga.
    "If it ain't broke, you're not trying." - Red Green

  3. #1578
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Quote Originally Posted by _QB_ View Post
    Yes I know. Probably just as well too, without a bunch of preparation. Apply by June 1. And make up signboards with basic construction details, quotes from the various publications about her, etc., so you don't have to repeat yourself ad infinitum.

    Anyway, obviously up to you if you ever want to do anything like that. A bunch of years ago I happened to be in PT the weekend before the festival. Walking the docks I saw a guy tidying up a nice wood sailboat. "Getting her ready for the big show?" I ask. "Hell no," he says. "I don't want a bunch of random people walking all over my boat. I'm fixing to get as far away from here as possible." It sounded like the voice of experience...
    Amusingly, I did see a few classic boats as I was heading up the Sound on Wednesday. Every one of them was heading the other way! We did the Port Townsend and Victoria boat shows with St. Brendan when I was a kid and it was fun to be right in with all the other boats. I think I'd be up for bringing Skookum Maru someday. I'd need to start getting her ready much earlier in the year though. With the miserable weather we had this past spring I didn't really get going on things until July and there is still a pretty decent task list that I haven't gotten to yet.

    Quote Originally Posted by Garret View Post
    We had our boat in the Wooden Boat Show 2 different years (both in Newport RI). With the exception of one jerk, really more just an idiot, everyone was polite & careful. We had some great conversations & met some good folks.

    Our one year at the PT WBF, we had the same positive experience, but from the other side. People were welcoming & friendly - especially a couple of Seaborn/Blanchard boats when they heard we are the caretakers of Neoga.
    That has been my experience as well. You get back what you bring to the show. If you hate the idea of interacting with a bunch of people who love wooden boats then it's probably not the place to be.



    I'm sitting here on Skookum Maru at Boat Haven Marina, finishing my coffee and watching the sunrise. I have some calls this morning and then I'm heading over to Point Hudson to see some boats. It's going to be a good day!
    - Chris

    Any single boat project will always expand to encompass the set of all possible boat projects.

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  4. #1579
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    So I finished up my work day early, grabbed a quick lunch aboard Skookum Maru, and headed out to see some boats. It was everything I had expected. Boats everywhere. Big boats, small boats, power boats, sail boats, row boats. Varnished yachts and sober work boats. There were boats for sale, boats being worked on, new and used hardware and equipment for sale... And that was just in my first twenty minutes of walking around the yard at Boat Haven before I even headed over to the show. I had forgotten that any normal day in Port Townsend is as good as most boat shows elsewhere.

    Nootka, an ex-BC mission boat, is out having some major surgery done at Haven Boatworks,



    I couldn't get close enough to see any detail on this pretty boat at Port Townsend Shipwrights Co-op, but I like the look of her a lot.



    There was way more to see at the boat yard but I had places to go so I hiked along the Port Townsend waterfront to Point Hudson Marina, where the real action was. First thing, I found s/v Ripple at the bottom of the ramp and introduced myself to Stuart, her owner.



    We had a nice chat about boats and cruising. Ripple is a great boat and full of wonderful details but the thing that stood out for me was this unusual piece of bronze hardware, behind the cleat.



    All the time we were talking I was staring at it trying to figure out what it was. I'm only a duffer when it comes to sailing but still I thought I knew most of the parts of a boat by now and I didn't recognize this one. Finally I asked Stuart about it and he showed me that it is a custom fitting that he had cast to create a pivot point for a tiller auto pilot. It's a work of art and easily my favorite detail of the entire show so far. Not just because of what it is, but that it represents a certain vision of how a wooden boat should be. It wasn't enough for Stuart to just cobble up some block of wood there. Only a bespoke casting would be suitable for Ripple. And the best part is that it just blends in like it was original to the boat.

    Further down the pier I passed Veteran and Sockeye, two retired working boats that I hope to go aboard this weekend.





    I like that splash of blue on the inside of Sockeye's pilothouse door, like the burst of color on an otherwise drab bird's wing.

    to be continued...
    - Chris

    Any single boat project will always expand to encompass the set of all possible boat projects.

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  5. #1580
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Continuing on, I passed a selection of classic yachts - Rip Tide,



    El Mistico,



    Thelonius,



    The lovely double-ender Merva, flanked by some equally beautiful sailboats,



    And Holiday, perhaps my second-favorite Monk design.





    Holiday has been in the same family since new. An amazing boat.

    to be continued...
    - Chris

    Any single boat project will always expand to encompass the set of all possible boat projects.

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  6. #1581
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    There were flocks of small craft to admire as well. I stopped by the cat boat Jean Alden in hopes of meeting her owner, Mike, but he was not around. Maybe tomorrow.



    Likewise Alex Z. was not aboard his newly-launched Tad Roberts design, Camas Moon. Another missed connection that I will try to make up tomorrow.



    Of course there were Bartenders of all sizes. I particularly liked this one - an original Calkins-built 22' model.



    I also liked Dillipy Anne, a little Monk-designed sloop.



    She has the proportions and lines of a much larger boat but she is only 23' LOA. Just a little jewel. And of course Ama Natura is always worth a look.



    She's looking for a new home. If only I could have all the boats...

    There was far, far more to see in every direction but I was halted by this sight.



    St. Brendan, the boat my parents owned and that we lived aboard when I was a boy, moored next to Savona, the first big boat I owned and that I lived aboard in my 20s and 30s. I had a moment just looking at them together. So much of my life captured right there. I fell in love with boats aboard St. Brendan and I fell in love with my wife aboard Savona (there is a story about a missing earring that must still be in the bilge of Savona somewhere...). It was good to see them both being cared for and in better shape than they have ever been. Long may that continue.

    There was plenty more to see but it was time to head back to Skookum Maru and dinner. It was a great day and I'll be back tomorrow with Tory and Dash to see all the things and meet all the people I missed today.
    - Chris

    Any single boat project will always expand to encompass the set of all possible boat projects.

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  7. #1582
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Thank you Chris, for taking the time!
    Brian

  8. #1583
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Yes, thank you Chris.

    In years past I have sailed boats to, and or, taken part in wooden boat festivals in NZ, Australia, Canada, the Caribbean and Europe.
    The fond memories of these past festivals, the people I got to meet and the experiences had are very cherished.
    The PT WBF is definitely on the to do list.
    So thank you again Chris for sharing, I have festival envy

    Cheers,
    Mike.
    Focus on the effort not the outcome.

    "Don't take life seriously. Either way, you won't make it out alive."

  9. #1584
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Quote Originally Posted by Boatsbgood View Post
    Thank you Chris, for taking the time!
    Brian
    Quote Originally Posted by Mike1902 View Post
    Yes, thank you Chris.

    In years past I have sailed boats to, and or, taken part in wooden boat festivals in NZ, Australia, Canada, the Caribbean and Europe.
    The fond memories of these past festivals, the people I got to meet and the experiences had are very cherished.
    The PT WBF is definitely on the to do list.
    So thank you again Chris for sharing, I have festival envy

    Cheers,
    Mike.
    Thanks Brian and Mike. I haven’t been to the PTWBF since the early 1980s and I had forgotten how extensive it is. I just had time to walk through it in half a day, going aboard only a couple of boats. I hope to do much more tomorrow. More to come!
    - Chris

    Any single boat project will always expand to encompass the set of all possible boat projects.

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  10. #1585
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Another thanks from me Chris. The WBF is wonderful & the one time I got there, I saw the difference between a WB Festival & a WB Show. The shows are fine - festivals are more better.
    "If it ain't broke, you're not trying." - Red Green

  11. #1586
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Sorry that I missed meeting you Chris. It looks like you stopped by while I was crewing on a Swampscot dory in the small boat race.

    796C558A-3E99-40AF-9ED8-4C0E630F6B08.jpg

    Chesuki is worth a thread of its own and often wins the race. We were late to the starting line and over canvased given the winds. The jib is not up yet in this photo.

    78F686F7-25B3-43C4-A87E-C51F39522681.jpg

    Still the owner, shown at the oars in the other photo, knows how to drive his boat hard in those conditions so we did reasonably well. We also had a lot of fun. Hope to see you on Saturday.

  12. #1587
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    I always think of the festival as a big winding river full of stories and adventures. You jump in with an idea of where you want to go, but once you are in the current, you just get pulled along from one pleasantly unexpected thing to another.
    Tales from the land and sea: http://terrapintales.wordpress.com/

  13. #1588
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Quote Originally Posted by Garret View Post
    Another thanks from me Chris. The WBF is wonderful & the one time I got there, I saw the difference between a WB Festival & a WB Show. The shows are fine - festivals are more better.
    That's a good way to put it. I've been to plenty of boat "shows" over the years and it's nice to see a bunch of boats all together. But the PTWBF is something else entirely.

    Quote Originally Posted by Mike.Higgins.94301 View Post
    Sorry that I missed meeting you Chris. It looks like you stopped by while I was crewing on a Swampscot dory in the small boat race.
    Ah, I think I saw you out there then. I'll stop by again today with hopefully better timing and luck.

    Quote Originally Posted by Bruce Bateau View Post
    I always think of the festival as a big winding river full of stories and adventures. You jump in with an idea of where you want to go, but once you are in the current, you just get pulled along from one pleasantly unexpected thing to another.
    That's exactly it! I went searching for Row Bird and found... many other things, but not her or you. I will try again today.
    - Chris

    Any single boat project will always expand to encompass the set of all possible boat projects.

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  14. #1589
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Today was...

    Blue Peter, presiding regally over the event in a haze of smoke and heat.



    Teal, facing her and looking every bit as imposing.



    Lady Washington, towering over her flock of smaller sailing craft.



    The motor yacht Rip Tide lost in a forest of masts of every size and configuration.



    And a thousand details, from the hardware on this window aboard the schooner Suva (which I am going to replicate for Skookum Maru, as her drop windows really need handles and a way to hold them partially open).



    To this beautiful deck key from Port Townsend Foundry.



    If anyone is looking for a stocking stuffer for me this Christmas one of these would do just fine.

    (contd.)
    - Chris

    Any single boat project will always expand to encompass the set of all possible boat projects.

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  15. #1590
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    And more details...

    The helm aboard Teal.



    And the one on the seiner Veteran.



    Holiday, the double-ended Monk cruiser has a lovely pilothouse.



    As does Halcyon, the converted Bill Garden troller.



    Teal's windlass is an imposing piece of hardware.



    But perhaps my favorite item from today was the vintage Olympic diesel stove aboard Veteran, still in use today (literally, they made pancakes on it this morning).



    Savona had, and still has, a smaller version of this exact stove and it brought back a lot of memories.

    (contd.)
    - Chris

    Any single boat project will always expand to encompass the set of all possible boat projects.

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  16. #1591
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Some things I loved to see at the festival.

    The number of boats featuring some form of electric propulsion, from this rudder-mounted motor on the Mackinaw Boat Saga,



    to the fully solar powered Electric Philosophy from Sam Devlin.





    Also (I never claimed to be consistent) this beautiful vintage outboard motor.



    All machinery should look like this - like it came from an artist and not a computer.

    I always enjoy finding new uses for oarlock sockets, like this tiller holder aboard Bruce's Row Bird.



    And the details on Mike's catboat, Jean Alden are just marvelous.



    (contd.)
    - Chris

    Any single boat project will always expand to encompass the set of all possible boat projects.

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  17. #1592
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    But above all, my favorite parts of the day were the people I got to meet and the wonderful conversations we had about boats and life and history. I met Bruce Bateau and his wife Kate for the first time, and got to share stories of boat and bicycle adventures. And on the next boat over I met and talked with Mike Higgins, with whom I share an enjoyment of words and ideas. I ran into Chris Cunningham, the editor of Small Boats Magazine, for the first time since the early 1980s, and swapped stories about when we worked together at the Wooden Boat Shop in Seattle, and the people that we knew back then. I even got a chance to say a quick hello to Bruce Smith (wizbang13 here) as he was busy serving "coffee" to guests lined up at his boat. (I don't think there were any caffeinated beverages involved, but you didn't hear that from me). There were many more people that I had hoped to meet or to reconnect with but wasn't able to. For anyone that I missed, I hope we will get another chance next year!

    My wife Tory and son Dash made the trip by car up from Seattle today and we walked the show for a while before she had to head back to take care of the dogs. Dash stayed behind to make the trip back with me aboard Skookum Maru. We had dinner and a game of Mille Bornes.



    He beat me two hands to zero. And then it was his bedtime. I'm reading The Wreck of the Mary Deare to him at night. John Sands and Gideon Patch have just run the ship up onto the Minkies to keep her from sinking. I don't know how many times I've read this book but it never gets old for me.

    Tomorrow we head back to Seattle, the end of our cruising season, and an overdue slate of maintenance work for Skookum Maru. More on that in a few days.
    - Chris

    Any single boat project will always expand to encompass the set of all possible boat projects.

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  18. #1593
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Great pics Chris.
    Thanks for sharing these. 😎

  19. #1594
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Hello Chris,

    I'm enjoying looking at your photos. What wonderful old boats.

    I was especially struck by Thelonius. I'd like to think the name that's on the dingy transom under the cover might be Mingus.

    Thanks very much.

    Regards,
    Alan

  20. #1595
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Thanks Chris, wonderful to tour vicariously with you!

    Ken
    When the desire to learn is greater than the desire to win, the journey becomes the prize.

  21. #1596
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    These pictures are awesome! I had no idea that this wooden boat festival was so huge.
    Makes the Wooden Boat Show in Mystic look tiny in size.
    Thanks for taking us along.
    I was born on a wooden boat that I built myself.
    Skiing is the next best thing to having wings.

  22. #1597
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    We have relatives that retired to Sequim. Hope that made it to Port Townsend. Thank you for the tour and pictures.

  23. #1598
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Thank you very much! - your attention to details, straight forward photography & general fine taste in boats make for a wonderful piece of work, it's much appreciated!

  24. #1599
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    Default

    Thank you, Chris!


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
    There are two kinds of boaters: those who have run aground, and those who lie about it.

  25. #1600
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Great photos - I love the veteran. Those skansie bros. really had a great eye. I would have loved to go up to Port Townsend but I was helping with our yacht club’s annual auction. Thanks for sharing.

  26. #1601
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Quote Originally Posted by Rich Jones View Post
    These pictures are awesome! I had no idea that this wooden boat festival was so huge.
    Makes the Wooden Boat Show in Mystic look tiny in size.
    Thanks for taking us along.
    Rich - you have no idea. As I said above - the name including "festival" seems to really make a difference - or maybe it's just the people and/or boats. I've enjoyed the WB Shows & have been to 'em in Mystic, Rockland, & Newport (including having Neoga @ Newport twice) - but the festival in PT takes it to whole 'nother level.
    "If it ain't broke, you're not trying." - Red Green

  27. #1602
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    At the risk of sounding like a broken record, THANKS! We were looking forward to the festival this year but it just wasn't in the cards.

  28. #1603
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Thanks everyone. I'm happy to be able to share something of my experience at the festival. It far exceeded every expectation and I am only sorry that I have not been before now. I checked the log of my parents' boat and found that we went to the Victoria show but never to Port Townsend, although I was certain that we had. We were in Port Townsend in August of 1980 but never in September.

    But truly, the photos convey only a tiny part of the whole. There was music, food, great talks from amateurs and professionals... (Bruce B. was a particular favorite of people who were lucky enough to see his presentation, which I'm sorry I missed). The total effect was of a living community of people all bound by a shared ethos. A love of wooden boats of course, but also a love of craftsmanship, a sense of proportion and place, the joy of stewardship for the work of those who came before us so that it will remain for those who come after. There are so many old boats that are uncared for, that need to be rescued, that it's easy to feel dispirited about the future of these vessels into which we pour so much labor and so many dreams. So it was rejuvenating to see all of the great people and wonderful boats in Port Townsend. It was a true festival.

    And as with any festival, there must come a morning after. Today I woke in the gray pre-dawn to head back to Seattle. Skookum Maru was covered with salt, boatyard dust and wildfire ash, a state which was not helped at all by the brief sprinkling of rain in the night. The rain was not enough to wash off the grime, but merely turned it into a gritty paste that coated every surface and inhabited every crevice. Time to take her home for cleaning and some past due maintenance.

    At first the day did show some brief promise, as the sun rose below the clouds...



    but by the time we left our slip the smoke had moved back in, creating a blanketing haze over the harbor.



    Still, there was enough light for two last boat photos. Pelican, the sister ship to Teal, was sitting at Boat Haven wearing her distinctive NOAA orange paint scheme.



    And this pretty schooner was anchored just outside the entrance.



    The run down to Seattle was uneventful but a bit of a slog. The hazy glare of the sun through the smoke gave limited visibility so piloting required a constant watch in all directions, combined with diligent monitoring of the radar and AIS to avoid ferries, tow boats, freighters and other commercial traffic on the Sound. But we made it with no incident more dramatic than the sloop which chose to tack directly ahead of us as I was trying my best to give way to them. They at least had the grace to wave apologetically as I swerved to pass astern. But I'm sure I have had plenty of equivalent incidents charged to my account so I will not judge.

    At last we ran the usual gauntlet of sailing dinghies and small fishing boats on the way into Shilshole, and tied up for the night before heading through the locks tomorrow.



    Home again.
    Last edited by cstevens; 09-11-2022 at 08:15 PM.
    - Chris

    Any single boat project will always expand to encompass the set of all possible boat projects.

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  29. #1604
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Thank you for sharing, Chris. Good photos and your usual engaging narrative.

    Jeff

  30. #1605
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Many thanks for this thread, Chris! I've only been to Port Townsend once, for the 2011 Festival. Way past time to go back. Meanwhile, your posts have filled some of the gaps for me.

    Tom
    Ponoszenie konsekwencji!

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  31. #1606
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Chris did a pretty good job of capturing the amazing handwork and beautiful boats that are there. I'd add a few things to round out the picture:

    First, I love that there are things to look at and things to do, like building a toy boat or paddling an SUP.



    There's also a lot of respect for the work that goes into any craft, big or small.


    And last, there's amazing opportunity to catch up with old friends and meet new ones. Here's me in the foreground along with Chris Cunningham, editor of Small Boats Monthly (center) and Chris S, reliving past glories. Perhaps Chris S. would elaborate about the discussion! (Note the weird sky color is from wildfire smoke.)
    Tales from the land and sea: http://terrapintales.wordpress.com/

  32. #1607
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Quote Originally Posted by Bruce Bateau View Post
    Chris did a pretty good job of capturing the amazing handwork and beautiful boats that are there. I'd add a few things to round out the picture:

    First, I love that there are things to look at and things to do, like building a toy boat or paddling an SUP.



    There's also a lot of respect for the work that goes into any craft, big or small.


    And last, there's amazing opportunity to catch up with old friends and meet new ones. Here's me in the foreground along with Chris Cunningham, editor of Small Boats Monthly (center) and Chris S, reliving past glories. Perhaps Chris S. would elaborate about the discussion! (Note the weird sky color is from wildfire smoke.)
    Ah! Thanks for adding that detail Bruce. I was so focused on the boats that I failed to capture everything else that was going on, and there was so very much of it. The toy boat building tent, The SUP pool, live music everywhere, from buskers every few yards to the main stage in the Bar Harbor tent... Vendors of all sorts selling boats, plans, clothing, trinkets, and every possible variety of fittings and hardware.

    That chance meeting with Chris Cunningham was another highlight of the event for me. The story there is that when I was twelve or so, and living aboard St. Brendan in a little marina on Boat Street (really - you can't make these things up), I spent my days hanging out at The Wooden Boat Shop, a little chandlery up the street from the marina. The WBS used to advertise in WoodenBoat Magazine throughout the 80s and early 90s, and they were a well-known source of traditional hardware and materials for many years. Anyway, the owners, Joe and Land, got tired of having me hanging around but instead of kicking me out they gave me a job as a gofer and general shop boy. Which was pure heaven for me. Like hiring a kid to staff a toy store. I worked there for a couple of summers, completely immersed in the Seattle wooden boat scene of the time.

    Chris C. also worked for the WBS at the same time that I was there. He was a little older than me - I think he was in his late twenties at the time - but we shared many of the same experiences and met many of the same people. Seattle in the early 1980s was at the heart of the wooden boat renaissance. The center of the wooden boat universe at the time might have been in Blue Hill, Maine, with WoodenBoat Magazine, Jon Wilson, and Maynard Bray, but Seattle had at least as much to offer. Brion Toss started his rigging business here. I met him and helped him serve splices on the sidewalk outside the shop one memorable day. Jay Benford was designing interesting, Bolger-esque boats up in Friday Harbor and sailing his pinky ketch Sunrise. She was featured on the cover of WoodenBoat one month, and a little while after that we spent Christmas in Reid Harbor with Sunrise anchored right next to us. And Frank Prothero was building his last schooner, Glory of the Seas, in a huge barge on Lake Union. I got to tour his shop once, and was able to go up onto the unfinished deck of that boat. That is a day I will never forget. The huge, dim workshop filled with old machines and arcane tools. The great hull of Glory towering over everything. And Frank himself - an icon of an industry that had all but vanished.

    Frank had no patience for fools. No patience for anyone to be honest. He had built ships with his bare hands, hard-earned skill, and force of will. He managed teams of men to produce an honest boat to a budget and a deadline, and turn a profit. I expect that he would have hated everything about our little community of amateur wooden boat enthusiasts. His brother, Bob Prothero, founded the Northwest School of Wooden Boatbuilding but Frank famously derided the idea that he might want to pass on his knowledge. What he knew was his to do with as he pleased, and it died with him as he wanted. When I was in his shop I kept my mouth shut and my hands in my pockets.

    And there was more - so much more! Dick Wagner was in the process of turning his little rowing livery, run out of a houseboat on Lake Union, into a nonprofit called the Center for Wooden Boats - an organization that has thrived and grown since then. Land Washburn, one of the owners of the WBS and a founding member of the CWB, introduced me to Dick back then. I was intimidated by him as well. I was twelve. I knew nothing about anything at all except that I wanted nothing more than to spend every possible moment in and around wooden boats. And I did. Land had a little Friendship Sloop and he took me day sailing on Lake Union. A friend of my parents was building a cruising sloop in his back yard and he hired me to help him plank the boat. We cut planks and hung them all one beautiful summer.

    Running into Chris at the PTWBF brought back all of these memories and we spent a while reminiscing about Seattle in the 1980s. That was a lot of fun but writing it all down like this makes me realize what an incredible moment in time that was. And filled with so many amazing people. Not one person, not even Frank Prothero, ever treated me like the kid - really, a child - that I was. One of these days I'll have to write more about that period as there is so much to tell and so many memories to share. The places and people are mostly gone now, but the memories are still there.
    - Chris

    Any single boat project will always expand to encompass the set of all possible boat projects.

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  33. #1608
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Great stories Chris and Bruce. Hopefully your guys' tales will become the stuff that kids will recall forty years hence, reminiscing over a brew and recalling the early days at the Wooden Boat Center where they spent some of their formative years. While I didn't have access to the Seattle scene, I got to spend some time in George Calkins' shop when I was a kid and those memories have stuck well

  34. #1609
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    wow that was a great photo essay - many thanks for sharing. Can I ask what you use camera/phone for the photos?
    kind regards Alan - in Auckland NZ
    "Old boats are like teenage girlfriends: there is a certain urgency to their needs & one neglects them at one's peril"


  35. #1610
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    Default Re: Skookum Maru

    Quote Originally Posted by Hugh MacD View Post
    Great stories Chris and Bruce. Hopefully your guys' tales will become the stuff that kids will recall forty years hence, reminiscing over a brew and recalling the early days at the Wooden Boat Center where they spent some of their formative years. While I didn't have access to the Seattle scene, I got to spend some time in George Calkins' shop when I was a kid and those memories have stuck well
    Quote Originally Posted by snow(Alan H) View Post
    wow that was a great photo essay - many thanks for sharing. Can I ask what you use camera/phone for the photos?
    kind regards Alan - in Auckland NZ
    Thanks Hugh and Alan. I am just using an iPhone 12 Pro, with no lenses or filters. I'd like to get a better lens kit for it but so far no one has taken the hint from my Christmas list. I might have to just get it for myself... I'm a snapshot photographer at best but I make up for it by taking a whole bunch of photos and just picking out the ones that came out ok.

    Tory and I brought Skookum Maru through the locks from Shilshole this morning. Back to her home slip for the first time since the beginning of August. Seems much longer than that somehow.





    Time for a post-cruise cleanup.

    I briefly thought about moving her to Shilshole permanently. There is a long-term sublease available there right now. I was imagining how nice it would be to be able to just head out any time we wanted, without dealing with the locks and it's delays and hassle. But the voice of reason (which usually sounds a lot like my wife) prevailed. The truth is that we might use the boat a few more weekends a year that way but at a cost in upkeep and wear on the boat.

    Next up, deck and cabin paint. The painter is starting on Monday and I have a bunch of prep to do before then so I'd better get on it.
    - Chris

    Any single boat project will always expand to encompass the set of all possible boat projects.

    Life is short. Go boating now!

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