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Thread: Return to Georgian Bay, Part I

  1. #36
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    Default Re: Return to Georgian Bay, Part I

    Well, I see the Forum is still turning my photos into links to attachments--they're photos when I log out, and links again when I log back in. Anyone have any ideas about what to do to prevent that from happening?

    I guess I'll keep trying to fix them. Maybe eventually I'll win...

    Tom
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  2. #37
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    Default Re: Return to Georgian Bay, Part I

    After hanging out with the dragonflies for a while, and exploring a few more dead ends:

    Day 6.4.jpg

    I kept going on my Tanvat Island circumnavigation. Again, southerly winds and LOTS of rocks made the decision to stick to rowing pretty simple:



    The southwest corner of the island might be my favorite place in the Bustards. Rocky and remote, with only occasional evidence that anyone else had ever been here--like this "inukshuk" cairn:

    DSCN5329.jpg

    I snuck past into a series of long narrow inlets on the south side of Tanvat Island. Lots of beavers. Lots of rocks. Still no other boats. Finally stopped for lunch deep up a narrow channel that I hoped would lead me through back to the island's east side.

    Day 6.5.jpg
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  3. #38
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    Default Re: Return to Georgian Bay, Part I

    Found a nice slabby island to step ashore:

    DSCN5336.jpg

    And watched an Eastern Massassauga Rattlesnake swim over to join me:

    DSCN5337.jpg

    DSCN5340.jpg

    Pretty cool to see a rare species like this crawl up onto my island. When I got home, I reported the sighting to the Ontario Reptile & Amphibian Atlas.
    Last edited by WI-Tom; 03-09-2019 at 05:37 PM.
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  4. #39
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    Default Re: Return to Georgian Bay, Part I

    Tom,

    I've lately been doing my Doodles in graphite and colored pencil, and they've been copied from pictures found here and on the web. All the color boat Doodles are down the Bilge, because, well, I'm sick.

    Anyway, there are a few pictures you took I'd very much like to draw, but I felt I should ask, first, as these are more than just snapshots you're sharing. I don't aim to do anything with them, and you'd be more than welcome to the drawings, when done. I've just lately been fascinated by trying to draw boats and water, and need distractions.

    There are a few haunting photos on this thread, with water that looks impossible to render. Which seems fun?

    Peace,
    Robert

    P.S. Your boat is lovely. I hope she truly brings you as much satisfaction as you'd hoped.

  5. #40
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    Default Re: Return to Georgian Bay, Part I

    Quote Originally Posted by amish rob View Post
    Tom,

    I've lately been doing my Doodles in graphite and colored pencil, and they've been copied from pictures found here and on the web. All the color boat Doodles are down the Bilge, because, well, I'm sick.

    Anyway, there are a few pictures you took I'd very much like to draw, but I felt I should ask, first, as these are more than just snapshots you're sharing. I don't aim to do anything with them, and you'd be more than welcome to the drawings, when done. I've just lately been fascinated by trying to draw boats and water, and need distractions.

    There are a few haunting photos on this thread, with water that looks impossible to render. Which seems fun?

    Peace,
    Robert

    P.S. Your boat is lovely. I hope she truly brings you as much satisfaction as you'd hoped.
    Rob,

    thanks for the kind words. Feel free to use any images I've posted for doodles. Funny, I was just thinking "I wonder if I asked Rob to draw one of my pictures, if he would be interested..." Great minds think alike, I guess.

    Thanks!

    Tom
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  6. #41
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    Default Re: Return to Georgian Bay, Part I

    After hanging out with the rattlesnake for a while, I continued on my way. It looked like I would probably make it, and eventually, I did. I found a new campsite on a cluster of three islands in an open interior bay:

    Day 6.6.jpg

    Had a long swim--cool water, maybe 70 degrees F, but not too bad. Came back to camp to hang out and read for a while. I had a feeling that the next morning would be clear weather, time to move on. But for now, a perfect place to spend the night.

    DSCN5387.jpg

    Finally got visual confirmation that there are, in fact, sandhill cranes in the Bustards:

    DSCN5401.jpg

    It had been a really great three days in the Bustards, but I suspected I'd be moving on in the morning. Lots more to see.
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  7. #42
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    Default Re: Return to Georgian Bay, Part I

    Quote Originally Posted by WI-Tom View Post

    What have you been up to with your Alaska, Rod?
    Tom
    I spent last summer doing a 12-year cleanup on the boat. New paint inside and out, re-fastened floorboards, etc. I did a couple of short trips before and after, but nothing to write home about - you know, a little rowing, a little sailing, a little swimming, a lot of horizontal contemplation, the usual. I am very happy with the new bivi shelter, though - next level comfort.

    I can't see any of the attachments in your post #22 and a few later on. I have no clue how to fix it - I can't even get into my own YouTube account any longer.

  8. #43
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    Default Re: Return to Georgian Bay, Part I

    Tom -- The links are all good for me now. But earlier today, they were not. I always upload photos directly to this site now, which should avoid problems with links to other sites. (The "from computer" -- "choose file" option)
    -Dave

  9. #44
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    Default Re: Return to Georgian Bay, Part I

    Quote Originally Posted by Woxbox View Post
    Tom -- The links are all good for me now. But earlier today, they were not. I always upload photos directly to this site now, which should avoid problems with links to other sites. (The "from computer" -- "choose file" option)
    Thanks for letting me know. I have actually been uploading directly to the Forum as you describe, but sometimes I'll upload photos, and later I'll come back and find attachment links instead of photos. I have two theories:

    1. Slow internet connection might mean I have to leave the thread open a certain amount of time after dowloading to not lose photos?

    2. Or, it seems like if I have used software to edit photos, they are more likely to turn into attachments later. Not a big problem, as I do very little editing anyway. But I've stopped completely now to see if that cures the problem.

    Tom
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  10. #45
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    Default Re: Return to Georgian Bay, Part I

    Quote Originally Posted by darroch View Post
    I spent last summer doing a 12-year cleanup on the boat. New paint inside and out, re-fastened floorboards, etc. I did a couple of short trips before and after, but nothing to write home about - you know, a little rowing, a little sailing, a little swimming, a lot of horizontal contemplation, the usual. I am very happy with the new bivi shelter, though - next level comfort.
    All right, I forgot--your Alaska is blue now. How do you like the new color?

    And when will you post details on your new shelter? Maybe on THIS THREAD about dinghy cruising?

    Tom
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  11. #46
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    Default Re: Return to Georgian Bay, Part I

    0D2B316F-B40F-4DD6-880C-56A4A02A5361.jpg
    Probably should have chosen a simpler one to do, eh?

    Well, I just have to remember these are 30 minute Doodles, not art.

    Peace,
    Robert

  12. #47
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    Default Re: Return to Georgian Bay, Part I

    Quote Originally Posted by amish rob View Post
    0D2B316F-B40F-4DD6-880C-56A4A02A5361.jpg
    Probably should have chosen a simpler one to do, eh?

    Well, I just have to remember these are 30 minute Doodles, not art.

    Peace,
    Robert
    It's good that you captured that birchbark canoe, I thought I was seeing things...

  13. #48
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    Default Re: Return to Georgian Bay, Part I

    Quote Originally Posted by WI-Tom View Post
    Thanks for letting me know. I have actually been uploading directly to the Forum as you describe, but sometimes I'll upload photos, and later I'll come back and find attachment links instead of photos. I have two theories:

    1. Slow internet connection might mean I have to leave the thread open a certain amount of time after dowloading to not lose photos?

    2. Or, it seems like if I have used software to edit photos, they are more likely to turn into attachments later. Not a big problem, as I do very little editing anyway. But I've stopped completely now to see if that cures the problem.

    Tom
    I have found that it only shows attachment links when I upload too many in a row and/or they have too many MB. It helps to close the window after a post with not more than 3 photos then reopen and do 3 more, or I can edit the photos to reduce the number of MB by resizing to 1/4, which doesn't always work anyway but at least they load faster.

    It always shows the photos first time around. It's when I next open the page that it shows the attachments. To fix that I click "edit" then one at a time delete the photos and reload them, not all that much trouble and certainly better than it used to be. It's always a good idea to close and reopen the page when you're finished as part of proof reading.

  14. #49
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    Default Re: Return to Georgian Bay, Part I

    Gib,

    thanks. I think that'll help a lot.

    Tom
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  15. #50
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    Default Re: Return to Georgian Bay, Part I

    Quote Originally Posted by amish rob View Post
    0D2B316F-B40F-4DD6-880C-56A4A02A5361.jpg
    Probably should have chosen a simpler one to do, eh?

    Well, I just have to remember these are 30 minute Doodles, not art.

    Peace,
    Robert
    How cool is that! Thanks, Rob. (Anyone who can even attempt to draw water impresses me).

    Tom
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  16. #51
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    Default Re: Return to Georgian Bay, Part I

    All right, coming to the end of Part I. The next morning (Day 7) came with clear weather, a beauty of a sunrise, and the not-too-unusual morning calm:

    DSCN5434.jpg

    Time to move on. It had been a great visit here, but I hadn't hoisted the sail for three days.

    DSCN5437.jpg

    I rowed east from Tanvat and the Bustards until I was past most of the rocks and shoals, then hoisted up to take advantage of a decent breeze that had me close reaching on down the coast of the Thirty Thousand Islands.



    The Bustard Islands are tucked into the elbow of Georgian Bay, right where the coast takes a southerly turn. From here on, I'd be heading south more than east--which meant, of course, that the wind took a turn toward southerly. I had been intending to take a more outside route, but with the wind shift, I decided to take what I could get instead of resigning myself to an endless series of tacks on the outside route (you can see my change of direction a few miles out from the Bustards):

    Day 7.1.jpg
    Last edited by WI-Tom; 03-10-2019 at 06:17 PM.
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  17. #52
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    Default Re: Return to Georgian Bay, Part I

    Hah! The wind will turn NW, which is prevailing, as soon as you reverse your course!

  18. #53
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    Default Re: Return to Georgian Bay, Part I

    I was able to do well without tacking, just holding a close reach, until I reached a narrow channel known as Rogers Gut. Rather than beating my way up this pinch point, I sailed around it on the inside, then dropped the rig and rowed around through a series of narrow channels, out of the headwinds for the most parts.

    Once through that series of tight spots, it was back to sailing:



    One slight inconvenience of using the mainsail in the center mast step--that step is about 12" lower than the mast step in the bow for the ketch rig, so you do have to lift up the sail occasionally to make sure you're not about to hit something to leeward.
    You don't have to be prepared as long as you're willing to suffer the consequences.

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  19. #54
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    Default Re: Return to Georgian Bay, Part I

    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Hadfield View Post
    Hah! The wind will turn NW, which is prevailing, as soon as you reverse your course!
    Sounds like you've sailed here before more than once... Actually, I got quite lucky with easterly winds, even southeasterly winds, on my return journey.

    Tom
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  20. #55
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    Default Re: Return to Georgian Bay, Part I

    I kept on trying to head south, and kept on having the winds shift, pushing me farther east. But really, not too bad. I just took what I could get on a close reach, didn't bother tacking. Sailed up into Black Bay (actually sailed past a group of kayakers circling Cunningham Island), which is quite rocky and shallow, and finally decided it was time to take to the oars for the final leg to camp. Wherever that was going to be.

    Day 7.2.jpg

    From the chart, it looked like there was a perfect harbor in the SE corner of Black Bay, so I headed that way.

    Day 7.3.jpg
    Last edited by WI-Tom; 03-10-2019 at 06:50 PM.
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  21. #56
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    Default Re: Return to Georgian Bay, Part I

    And it was just as good as I'd hoped:

    DSCN5466.jpg

    Even had a carpet of pine needles over the tent slab. And a perfectly sheltered place to tie up, as usual:

    DSCN5469.jpg
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  22. #57
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    Default Re: Return to Georgian Bay, Part I

    So, Day 7, about 15 miles from the Bustard Islands to my little corner of Black Bay. Maybe 2 miles rowing, and 13 sailing on a close reach:

    Day 7.4.jpg

    Fifteen miles is not a particularly long day in this boat, but it looks a lot longer on the Georgian Bay Small Craft Route strip charts when you lay them all out:

    DSCN5464.jpg

    And all that blue on the chart means no charted depths, rocks everywhere, and even a boat with 7" draft might not sneak through. I guess it's not that surprising that the only boats I run into out here are kayakers.

    Day 7.5.jpg
    Last edited by WI-Tom; 03-10-2019 at 07:04 PM.
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    Default Re: Return to Georgian Bay, Part I

    And finally, the end of Part I--a video log that pretty much covers everything I posted about above:



    Seven days (three of them in the Bustards), about 120 miles total distance covered. Seems like a 20-mile day is pretty typical for my Alaska (then again, I tend to avoid long beats, which would really slow things down). Average daily distance about 16 miles (but that includes rest/exploration days). Average distance on the days when I'm actually traveling somewhere seems to be right around 20 miles, with some shorter and some longer days in the mix.

    Thanks again for all the comments and interest. If you're into small boat cruising, Georgian Bay is hard to beat. If you haven't been there yet, what's stopping you?

    Tom
    Last edited by WI-Tom; 03-10-2019 at 07:15 PM.
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  24. #59
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    Default Re: Return to Georgian Bay, Part I

    Quote Originally Posted by WI-Tom View Post
    Thanks again for all the comments and interest. If you're into small boat cruising, Georgian Bay is hard to beat. If you haven't been there yet, what's stopping you?
    Tom
    Been busy with other stuff for the past week or so and therefore late to this thread. Good stuff, really appreciate you taking the time to tell us about the trip and post the pictures.

    What's stopping me? Well, the 4,000 km drive, one way, with the trailer, is a little off-putting. Other than that, just lazy, I guess.
    Last edited by AJZimm; 03-10-2019 at 07:23 PM. Reason: typo
    Alex

    "“He was unfamiliar with the sea and did not like it much: it was a place that made you cold and wet and sick” " Nevil Shute, Trustee From the Toolroom

  25. #60
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    Default Re: Return to Georgian Bay, Part I

    Quote Originally Posted by AJZimm View Post
    Been busy with other stuff for the past week or so and therefore late to this thread. Good stuff, really appreciate you taking the time to tell us about the trip and post the pictures.

    What's stopping me? Well, the 4,000 km drive, one way, with the trailer, is a little off-putting. Other than that, just lazy, I guess.
    Just drive in miles, Alex--then it's only 2,500 or so. That's almost a 50% reduction right there!

    Tom
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  26. #61
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    Default Re: Return to Georgian Bay, Part I

    Oh yes. In that map you posted of Black Bay, we put Drake up onto a shoal of rock. It was in the main part, before where you turned left to go up that inlet.

    There were no depths charted at the time. And I got a bit cocky coming back out.

    But it's lovely. A lot like the Benjamins, but never a crowd. Henvey, and Sandy Bay, are much the same.

  27. #62
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    Default Re: Return to Georgian Bay, Part I

    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Hadfield View Post
    Oh yes. In that map you posted of Black Bay, we put Drake up onto a shoal of rock. It was in the main part, before where you turned left to go up that inlet.

    There were no depths charted at the time. And I got a bit cocky coming back out.

    But it's lovely. A lot like the Benjamins, but never a crowd. Henvey, and Sandy Bay, are much the same.
    Dave,

    I've been on the Forum long enough that I shouldn't have to ask, but what kind of boat is Drake?

    Edit to say: I found THIS THREAD about it with a quick search--very cool! But that's a LOT of boat to take into Black Bay; I'm not sure I'd be too comfortable doing that. Great boat, though.

    Tom
    Last edited by WI-Tom; 03-11-2019 at 02:06 AM.
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  28. #63
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    Default Re: Return to Georgian Bay, Part I

    I've taken enough time and space here, but i drew a Doodle of the Phoenix, too, Tom, and posted it down there...

    Peace,
    Super Jealous Of This Spot!

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    Default Re: Return to Georgian Bay, Part I

    Thanks--I'll check it out. That Phoenix III is a great boat, and I put a lot of miles in on it. Especially considering I didn't build it, and don't own it... That's the boat that first took me to Georgian Bay, actually:

    DSCF8130.jpg

    Tom
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    Default Re: Return to Georgian Bay, Part I

    A few thoughts on what I think of the Alaska design now after two seasons:

    1. It's great.

    2. Using just the mainsail in the center step works well for me. I admit I've only spent a few days sailing with a mizzen, so possibly I'd change my mind with more experience. But so far, I don't feel like a mizzen is necessary, or even that it would be an improvement. In really rough conditions I might change my mind VERY rapidly about that, but so far I have succeeded in avoiding exposure to those conditions. I do, perhaps, value the simplicity of a single sail/single sheet rig more than other sailors, AND the ability to keep a conventional tiller. I really would not enjoy the complications that adding a yawl mizzen to my Alaska would bring. And I would have a very hard time adding the ketch mizzen as designed, and losing lots of room in the cockpit.

    I know Alex has experience with all 3 rigs (single sail, ketch, and yawl), and I suspect he can make a strong argument in favor of the yawl mizzen. But I'm happy without it right now, though it's always an option later if I change my mind. But that push-pull tiller does NOT appeal.

    3. The bungee/line tiller tamer improves my cruising experience IMMENSELY. I love being able to let go of the tiller at any moment and have the boat sail itself.

    4. I'm using a fiddle block with cam cleat for the downhaul, and this is by far the nicest set-up I have ever used. It's easy to get adequate luff tension, quick to adjust just by leaning forward and grabbing the line. It's a big improvement. Here is the block I'm using, a Holt 30mm; not even that expensive at less than $45:

    https://www.coastwatersports.com/hol...ce=GoogleBase1

    5. I still like the boomless sail, though you obviously lose a lot of sail shaping ability (including the ability to flatten the sail in heavy winds, which is what I miss the most). But doing without the boom does not seem to affect performance all that much for my purposes, and the increased simplicity is very satisfying for me.

    6. I need a cover for the mast partner in the aft deck. That's where I store all the stuff I'll want to get at during the day (and it's really nice for that), but that hole does let rain and spray in. Easy enough to build a simple cover.

    7. I still mean to make a padded bag/case to store my 6 lb Northill anchor on the forward platform so I can lash it in securely. I've been a little sloppy about that, just tucking it away without really securing it.

    Not sure what else to say--nothing new, other than being even happier with the boat after the second season than I was after the first. I have certainly come to trust the reserve stability a lot more than I did at first, and have gotten used to the relatively low freeboard.

    If anyone has good additions or modications to suggest for dinghy cruising, I'd love to hear your ideas. Happy sailing!

    Tom
    Last edited by WI-Tom; 03-13-2019 at 12:18 AM.
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    Default Re: Return to Georgian Bay, Part I

    Quote Originally Posted by WI-Tom View Post
    Dave,

    I've been on the Forum long enough that I shouldn't have to ask, but what kind of boat is Drake?

    Edit to say: I found THIS THREAD about it with a quick search--very cool! But that's a LOT of boat to take into Black Bay; I'm not sure I'd be too comfortable doing that. Great boat, though.

    Tom
    Drake's centerboard allows flexibility. She only draws 40" with the board up. So we can wiggle into places that most cruising sailboats don't go -- and we can arrive at crowded anchorages at 19:00 on a Saturday, and find a spot near shore. But in Black Bay I went ahead in the dinghy and marked a safe course. It was on the way OUT that we slithered onto a flat rock.

    You can't see down of course -- the water is all tea-coloured by the tannin of the lakes and rivers to the east. Anyway, on the way out I thought I remembered where we had twisted and turned, so I didn't repeat the dinghy-guide technique. Oops!

    Anyway, a small fishing-boat came by. I took a mainmast halyard, bent on another 100 ft of line, and had him pull us sideways. We then came off no problem, no damage.

    As you saw from my thread, Drake has the perfect keel for mishaps of this kind...

    drakeintravelift1.jpg

    … a great long solid thick casting of iron.

    Sorry for the thread hijack.

  32. #67
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    Default Re: Return to Georgian Bay, Part I

    Quote Originally Posted by WI-Tom View Post
    A few thoughts on what I think of the Alaska design now after two seasons:








    4. I'm using a fiddle block with cam cleat for the downhaul, and this is by far the nicest set-up I have ever used. It's easy to get adequate luff tension, quick to adjust just by leaning forward and grabbing the line. It's a big improvement. Here is the block I'm using, a Holt 30mm; not even that expensive at less than $45:

    https://www.coastwatersports.com/hol...ce=GoogleBase1


    Tom
    Tom, do you have any photos of your fiddle-block downhaul arrangement? Thanks.

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    Default Re: Return to Georgian Bay, Part I

    Quote Originally Posted by BobW View Post
    Tom, do you have any photos of your fiddle-block downhaul arrangement? Thanks.
    Nothing too specific, but let's see what I can find. How's this?

    downhaul closeup.jpg

    The fiddle block/cam cleat combo unit is on a snap shackle at the tack. The snap shackle makes it easy and fast to move it up to the next highest grommet when reefing.

    Then, for the rest--basically, I drilled a hole through the mast partner just big enough for a 4mm (I think) Dyneema line (the black line), and tied a loop in it (with a small block) above the partner. A stopper knot below the partner keeps the black line from pulling through.

    With the loop and small block in place at the partner, one end of my downhaul (the white line) is tied off to the same loop the block is on, runs up through the fiddle block, back down to the small block on the black line's loop, and back up through the fiddle block again, ending at the cam cleat.

    Does that make sense? Easier to do than to describe. Here's the photo again, slightly more zoomed in:

    downhaul closeup 2.jpg

    I left the tail of the downhaul (white line) long enough that I can reach the downhaul from the center of the boat, without going forward to the mast. I did not want to mess with routing the line all the way back to the helm, as it is easy to let the bungee-line self steering hold the boat on course while I lean forward to adjust the downhaul. Less clutter, fewer lines in the cockpit.

    This works really well. The only thing I want to change is to get a better block at the bottom (on the black loop). The one I have now is not on a swivel, and it does tend to capsize now and then, letting the line slip off the block. That's not a big deal, though; it still functions well as is.

    One more photo that may be a bit clearer:

    downhaul closeup 3.jpg

    Tom
    Last edited by WI-Tom; 03-13-2019 at 12:27 AM.
    You don't have to be prepared as long as you're willing to suffer the consequences.

    www.tompamperin.com

  34. #69
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    northwestern Wisconsin
    Posts
    4,356

    Default Re: Return to Georgian Bay, Part I

    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Hadfield View Post
    Drake's centerboard allows flexibility. She only draws 40" with the board up. So we can wiggle into places that most cruising sailboats don't go -- and we can arrive at crowded anchorages at 19:00 on a Saturday, and find a spot near shore. But in Black Bay I went ahead in the dinghy and marked a safe course. It was on the way OUT that we slithered onto a flat rock.

    You can't see down of course -- the water is all tea-coloured by the tannin of the lakes and rivers to the east. Anyway, on the way out I thought I remembered where we had twisted and turned, so I didn't repeat the dinghy-guide technique. Oops!

    Anyway, a small fishing-boat came by. I took a mainmast halyard, bent on another 100 ft of line, and had him pull us sideways. We then came off no problem, no damage.

    As you saw from my thread, Drake has the perfect keel for mishaps of this kind...

    drakeintravelift1.jpg

    … a great long solid thick casting of iron.

    Sorry for the thread hijack.
    Not a hijack at all--I'd love to see more of your own Georgian Bay/North Channel cruising. Have you had Drake on Lake Superior at all? I've only sailed the Apostle Islands, but would love to cruise the north shore and especially the Pukwaska.

    Tom
    You don't have to be prepared as long as you're willing to suffer the consequences.

    www.tompamperin.com

  35. #70
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Gowen, MI
    Posts
    388

    Default Re: Return to Georgian Bay, Part I

    Thanks for the description and photos of your downhaul. I was trying to visualize your Holt block at the bottom of the downhaul - my downhaul is set up with a fiddle-block on the bottom and a single block with a becket lashed to the boom. Makes more sense having seen it.

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