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Thread: Some of Jay's tiny detail planes for model and other fine work

  1. #1
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    Default Some of Jay's tiny detail planes for model and other fine work

    Several of you have requested some photos of my model making planes. So here are a few of them. The plane at the top is a 45deg. adjustable chamfering plane followed by some small metal spoke shaves with shaped bottoms for cutting hollows and a flat. Then a hollowing Japanese pull plane and two matched skew planes followed by a few odd ball planes for delicate work. Blades are kept separately wrapped in rust protective paper.
    Jay

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Some of Jay's tiny detail planes for model and other fine work

    Here are a few more, the metal plane is made by Lee Nielsen and cuts very well for making half models. The Japanese planes cut amazingly fine and are really nice as they can be shaped to fit a specific need. They came from Hida Tools in Berkley CA. What you see here is the begininng
    deck layout study in 1:29.5 scale which is Garden Railway. Placing scale figures on deck will allow the client to see what to expect from the full size boat. This is a 28 foot boat. A larger moel iis being made at thirty three feet. This will become a guide for the building of a 1/3 sized pirate ship for a client. All parts are being made ready for assembly over the next few days. The model is only used as a study aid. A full set of drawings will be made for actual construction.
    Jay

  3. #3
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    Default Re: Some of Jay's tiny detail planes for model and other fine work

    Nice Jay! I haven't tried making any planes yet but I have a hankering to. I'm also planning on experimenting with forging a blade or two. Wish me luck!

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    Default Re: Some of Jay's tiny detail planes for model and other fine work

    That is very interesting Hugh please let us know when you can show one you have made. What kind of steel do you plan to forge? Maybe you could give us a work in progress report?
    Bird

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    Default Re: Some of Jay's tiny detail planes for model and other fine work

    Hi Jay,
    Won't be 'til this summer. I'm still making my anvil but I think I still have a chunk of 1095 I can play with. Not the best steel for a plane blade. I may have some O-1 if I can find it. Should be fun I think I can scrounge up some beech for a body and I have lots of walnut for a wedge. Just what I need...another ​project I'll definitely be posting the process so everyone can giggle at my mistakes. I also have a wakizashi blade I need to assemble into something. I'll document that, too.

  6. #6
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    Default Re: Some of Jay's tiny detail planes for model and other fine work

    Thanks for showing this Jay . Where did you get the blades for your smallest planes?

  7. #7
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    Default Re: Some of Jay's tiny detail planes for model and other fine work

    Beautiful! thanks, this is inspiring.. for when it becomes possible to spend the time going fine small work.

  8. #8
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    Default Re: Some of Jay's tiny detail planes for model and other fine work

    I think I have a paper print out of some articles Bob Smalser posted re the making of planes for specific purposes. Scaling down worked well but some of the irons I made are a bit rough. I made 2 or 3 and they are in the shop in a case somewhere. I used them last year.

  9. #9
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    Default Re: Some of Jay's tiny detail planes for model and other fine work

    These tiny planes are made in Japan by a craftsman who specializes in making them. The blades are not wedged. The fit of the blade to the body is tight enough to hold the blades in place. They come in handy for models, half models and fine boat joinery. My source is Hida Tools in Berkley California. I bought them many years ago. Knowing how expensive good Japanese tools are today I think you are wise to make your own. The bodies of these planes are made of Japanese red oak. If you have beech at your disposal I think that is a very good choice!
    Good Luck,
    Jay

  10. #10
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    Default Re: Some of Jay's tiny detail planes for model and other fine work

    If anyone is interested in getting some small spokeshaves similar to what Jay has shown... Patrick Leach has a set of three this month on his listing: http://www.supertool.com/forsale/march2019list.html

    Look for item MS136. I would be buying these except I have a set.

    Jeff

  11. #11
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    Default Re: Some of Jay's tiny detail planes for model and other fine work

    While I enjoy making my own planes, I have made many over the years, when you get as old as I am and Father Time breaths a frost warning down your neck, I choose to purchase tools, I might need for special work, just to save time! This allows me to concentrate on the work rather than the tools! Often, in the past, I have modified wood bodied planes to suit special shaping needs for spar work. While it seems a shame to re-work a perfectly good plane, the steel is usually better than modern planes contain and the heavy blades reduce chatter and are easier to hold for honing. This is true unless you can afford to acquire tools such as those made by Lee Neilsen which are worth every penney they cost!
    I must admit that I am drawn, like a moth to a flame, to garage sales and second hand rummage stores and I often find a jewel of an antique tool that has been stashed away for the last 100 years in a dusty attic. These are the best prizes of all as they can often be purchased much more reasonably than the newer versions that are on the market today. I do spend a bit of time caring for my edge tools to keep them rust free,sharp and stored where they won't suffer damage from moisture or radical changes in temperature.
    Jay aka Bird

  12. #12
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    Default Re: Some of Jay's tiny detail planes for model and other fine work

    Quote Originally Posted by Jay Greer View Post
    I must admit that I am drawn, like a moth to a flame, to garage sales and second hand rummage stores and I often find a jewel of an antique tool that has been stashed away for the last 100 years in a dusty attic. These are the best prizes of all as they can often be purchased much more reasonably than the newer versions that are on the market today.
    Jay aka Bird
    Me too, but I've become a pretty disappointed moth these days. I suppose that "garage sale" finds may still be found in the "wilds" in some places around the country, but it's sure becoming a thing of the past in Northern CA. I think our generation are "the last of the Mohicans" when it comes to owning decent tools, Jay. The younger generation, when they work with their hands at all, don't seem to amass the "good stuff" that used to be pretty common at garage and estate sales. People move a lot more often, for one thing, and they tend to "travel light' and not keep stuff, so there aren't as many "barn finds" as there once were. Then there's what I call "the Antiques Road Show" phenomenon." A lot of people who come across anything old, dusty, and dirty, think it's worth big bucks. There really isn't a whole lot in the tool category made since WWII that's really made to last, sad to say. There are those few who will spring for the spendy Lie Nielsen "jewelry," and more power to 'em, but, polished bronze bodies notwithstanding, I don't think they cut any better than a properly fettled Stanley with an original blade or a good Hock aftermarket job. Your LN #100 "squirrel tail" modelmaker's plane is reasonably priced at around $75, but the Stanley #100 originals can still be had on eBay for less than $50 on average. I found mine years ago in a miscellaneous junk box at a garage sale for less than a buck. I don't expect that to happen ever again.

    I can't remember the last garage sale I hit that had 'tools" in the listing that ended up having any that I though were of any interest. Maybe I should go looking for them in places like those guys on American Pickers. I bet those guys overlook a lot of good old tools because all they are really looking for is stuff like old tin signs people with more money than brains can hang on their "man cave" walls. They did a show in my neck of the woods last year. Ahead of time, they put ads in all the newspapers asking for leads to "people with old barns full of junk" they could check out for the show. They found a really rich guy with a winery who had filled up a barn with old stuff, most of which he'd bought from somebody else within the last ten years. it wasn't like it was stuff he or his family had had since it was new.

    Maybe the thing to do is follow the obituaries (which my mother used to call "the irish Racing Form.") and start stalking widows for their late husband's tools.
    Last edited by Bob Cleek; 03-07-2019 at 08:07 PM.

  13. #13
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    Default Re: Some of Jay's tiny detail planes for model and other fine work

    I guess I live close enough to the "wilds" to still find the occasional gem. Nothing spectacular, but functional for cheap enough that I can give them to beginner friends, show them how to sharpen and tune them and then coach them in their use. My own "working" tools were inherited from my grandfather-in-law and an old friend's dad. Mostly pre-war or immediately post war Stanleys that I've learned the use of out of respect for those craftsmen.

  14. #14
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    Default Re: Some of Jay's tiny detail planes for model and other fine work

    Huh, in the last few months I've picked up a shipwrights adze, a top maul, and a skill 100. I played less than 20 for the first two, and around 50 for the skill. I've also found some pretty good odds and ends. Trick is finding good spots to look and checking regularly. On a different note, on those small planes are the irons themselves tapered? I'm having trouble envisioning how they dont slip without a wedge.
    Thanks

  15. #15
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    Default Re: Some of Jay's tiny detail planes for model and other fine work

    It is pretty much hit and miss nowadays, I must agree, when it comse to finding good second hand tools. That is why I now might spring for a special tool such as those above. I also agree that a good old Stanley tool will cut just fine. The one thing about those bronze Lee Nelson plances is the weight that they have to carry through the cut. And all of the parts fit very very well!
    Jay

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