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Thread: You may call me a sinner. I just had to adopt to reality.

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
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    472

    Default You may call me a sinner. I just had to adopt to reality.

    I sold my wooden boat today.
    After storing it for 18 years in a temporary shed awaiting an opportunity to finish the rebuild I decided it was time to give up.
    I lost 15 years of my life to sometimes partial and sometimes full disability after a work accident and now that I am finally recovering at age 37 after 5 years of daily hard training I have more important things to do with my life than to rebuild the boat I started rebuilding as a teenager.

    Getting my economy sorted out and setting up a business and starting a future with my girlfriend are more important things than a boat. I also got a bit involved in politics. Wanting to make society better for it's less fortunate members and for ethnic minorities.

    The boat is an open clinker built 22 foot double ender built is the local variety of the Scandinavian tradition. A very good seaboat. I spent a lot of time on the water in it when I was a teenager.

    However...... through a sort of barter with a friend I will shortly become the owner of a rather similar fiberglass hull though a wee bit deeper. It was actually built in the 70-ies using an old wooden fishing boat as mould. The fisherman liked his old rotten boat so he wanted an exactly similar one in fiberglass and so he did.
    My old Bukh DV10 inboard motor will fit the fiberglass hull. The hull is sound and will only need minor repairs.

    So...... I gave up my ideals for the sake of practicality. Call me a sinner if you want but for me it is pure pragmatism. A functional boat is better than a half rebuilt boat is a shed.

    So..... maybe I should leave the forum.....
    Amateur living on the western coast of Finland

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
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    New Hampshire
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    1,417

    Default Re: You may call me a sinner. I just had to adopt to reality.

    No way dude you must continue to post!

    First-- Congratulations and good luck on your recovery and whatever that entails going forward. Stay on the training- crush it to 40! I was out on disability for over a year (not even close to 5yrs) in my mid-30's and it was very not fun-- physical pain, not working/being able to work, weird societal judgements from other people, finances, all that. I get it- good luck!!! Keep at it! Crush!

    Second-- Pics! Do not leave the forum, post here pictures of your adventures in your new boat, I certainly want to see some Finland boating and I agree with your logic in your post.

    Third-- The best part is that you still have a boat! That is all that matters.
    Last edited by callsign222; 03-02-2019 at 05:25 PM.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
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    magnolia springs, alabama u.s.a.
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    13,418

    Default Re: You may call me a sinner. I just had to adopt to reality.

    Don't leave because of owning a glassfibre boat. I have several boats, a couple of them wood and a couple of the glass. I love boats regardless of their make, and you probably do too. Stick around.

    Mickey Lake
    'A disciple of the Norse god of aesthetically pleasing boats, Johan Anker'

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Lakebay, WA
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    758

    Default Re: You may call me a sinner. I just had to adopt to reality.

    Stay or leave is entirely up to you.
    Good luck with relationship and the business!
    1955 Fontana 18' - 1958 Atomic 4
    1960 Skippy 12C FeatherCraft - 1947 Mercury KD4 Rocket
    1985 Glen L15 - 1980 Johnson 7.5 hp
    2016 kayak Mill Creek 13

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
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    St. Helens, Oregon
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    1,515

    Default Re: You may call me a sinner. I just had to adopt to reality.

    No sin there! Sounds like an acknowledgement of your current reality. Happily, your reality still includes boats so pictures and reports ae more than welcome! Good luck with your future business and do keep us up to date with your recovery. After three broken vertebrae, a flailed ribcage and cracked hip I'm not unfamiliar with recoveries. But after those I did everything the doctors ordered and was able to sail a Pacific-Cup later on.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Sound Beach, NY
    Posts
    3,703

    Default Re: You may call me a sinner. I just had to adopt to reality.

    There comes a time to let a boat go. I have, several times. I'm sure there are others on this forum that do not own wooden boats, there is no membership requirement aside from interest in wooden boats.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Lake Champlain, Vermont
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    2,783

    Default Re: You may call me a sinner. I just had to adopt to reality.

    I bet you will put some wood in that new boat. Lets call it a composite. And by all means, lets see some pics of your woodwork. Nothing, absolutely nothing, is half as much fun as simply messing about with boats.
    (I know that is misquoted, but close enough)

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
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    Saint Helena Island, SC
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    9,567

    Default Re: You may call me a sinner. I just had to adopt to reality.

    I’m looking at glass center consoles. No criticisms here.
    Fight Entropy, build a wooden boat!

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    maine
    Posts
    153

    Default Re: You may call me a sinner. I just had to adopt to reality.

    Heimlaga,
    A lucky few have the resources to own the boat they want at the time they want. The rest of us have to take what we can get when we can get it.
    I believe it's not so much what you own at any one time as it is your love for wooden boats and traditions that keep them alive.
    If you have the time, I'd like to hear more about the project boat you got rid of and see some pictures of your new boat, which sounds pretty interesting.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
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    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    8,358

    Default Re: You may call me a sinner. I just had to adopt to reality.

    I've generally had a plastic boat of some kind in the mix over the years. The wooden boats have generally been the smaller ones. No sin in wanting to get out on the water, what it's all about in the end anyway.
    -Dave

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Hills of Vermont, USA
    Posts
    27,476

    Default Re: You may call me a sinner. I just had to adopt to reality.

    Please stick around & good luck with the recovery & politics! Hmm... wooden boat owner, politician. Glutton for punishment!
    "If it ain't broke, you're not trying." - Red Green

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    East Quogue,NY
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    17,007

    Default

    All one needs is an appreciation of wooden boats. Some members own mo boat of any kind.

    Kevin


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
    There are two kinds of boaters: those who have run aground, and those who lie about it.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
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    1,333

    Default Re: You may call me a sinner. I just had to adopt to reality.

    The most important thing about boats is using them, not working on them.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    472

    Default Re: You may call me a sinner. I just had to adopt to reality.

    Thanks
    I will stay on the forum then.
    You are absolutely right. The alternative to a fiberglass boat is in my life situation no boat at all..... and this is as close to a wooden boat as I ever can get in fiberglass.
    This boat was moulded over an old wooden fishing boat in 1980 and finished in -81. The old boat was likely built in the 50-ies or 60-ies so that is the origin of the hull shape. It seems to be around 23 feet long but I haven't measured it.

    The builder was accustomed to wooden boats so he installed wooden frames made from grown crooks and fiberglassed over them. The engine bed is also wooden as are the breasthooks. All this wood is rotten. I need to come up with a way to fix it.

    Under the fiberglass sole in the hold is actually some rotten wood too. I plan to cut it open and install a traditional wooden ceiling in the boat. Wedged in place under the crossbeam in the old way. Just like they did in the old wooden boats. That would protect the inside of the fiberglass hull if I occasionally want to transport some building materials to roadless job sites just as a way to make the boating hobby partially self financig.

    The boat is now fitted with a 14hp Volvo-Penta MB10A. The motor and propeller will be sold to the buyer of my old wooden boat and insted I will install my old 10hp Bukh DV10 with it's propeller. The Bukh has better fuel economy and I want cheap cruising above all.

    I rekon the propeller will fit the boat as the underwater body is pretty much the same shape on this boat and my former wooden boat. There is a tiny bit more deadrise in the first two strakes on this one so the keel ends up a few centimeters deeper but otherwise the shape is the same.
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Last edited by heimlaga; 03-08-2019 at 11:00 AM.
    Amateur living on the western coast of Finland

  15. #15
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    Apr 2015
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    St. Helens, Oregon
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    Default Re: You may call me a sinner. I just had to adopt to reality.

    Looks like a nice sheerline Any idea where the original was made? It may be glass, but I, for one, would still like to see pictures

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
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    472

    Default Re: You may call me a sinner. I just had to adopt to reality.

    I asked the previous owner.

    The original was built by Karl "Kalle" Backman in Panike which is a tiny hamlet some 30 kilometres northwest of Vasa on the western coast of Finland. Probably at some point around 1955-57.
    All the local fishing boat builders planked more or less by eye. Some using a few moulds as a sort of starting point from which they made changes to suit the needs of the customer as planking progressed and some using no moulds at all so there were certainly never any drawings.

    I wrote down the information about the builder on a piece of paper and put it in the same folder as the bill of sale. To save the boatbuilder from being forgotten.

    The boat is now in a very tightly packed temporary shed. It isn't possible to take any proper pictures until we take it out to lift out the motor which is heading for the new owner of my old boat. That will be as soon as I as I have finished logging season and mount the front loader on my tractor.

    The sheer curve is very deep in order to provide plenty of reserve boyancy in bow and stern to handle the short steep waves off Panike and Söderudden and a low waist for hauling the nets. The original boat had a removable extra plank locally called "stjiibåol" (the spelling is home made) above the proper gunwale. It was in three parts which could be removed or put back independently. It was handy to be able to reduce freeboard for hauling nets or loading cargo and on older motorless boats also for rowing long distances upwind.
    As the boat was copied in plastic the forward and aft parts of the stjiibåol were made permanent and the middle part was omitted.
    Last edited by heimlaga; 03-08-2019 at 01:56 PM.
    Amateur living on the western coast of Finland

  17. #17
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    Default Re: You may call me a sinner. I just had to adopt to reality.

    Nice! Little bits of history like that are well worth preserving. Thanks for sharing!

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
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    Default Re: You may call me a sinner. I just had to adopt to reality.

    Quote Originally Posted by Reynard38 View Post
    I’m looking at glass center consoles. No criticisms here.
    YOU'RE LOOKING AT WHAT!?!?

    I was born on a wooden boat that I built myself.

  19. #19
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    Apr 2009
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    Default Re: You may call me a sinner. I just had to adopt to reality.

    I still own the fiberglass canoe that I bought 48 years ago, so I can't throw any stones! Every boat since has been wood.
    The fact that a wooden boat was used as a mold for your new boat is good enough for me!
    Please keep us up to date on the project.
    I was born on a wooden boat that I built myself.

  20. #20
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    Apr 2010
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    South Australia and Tasmania
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    Default

    Sounds to me like you have a wooden boat that has been sheathed. Ok maybe they took the wood out, but still, it's a wooden boat.

    Sent from my CPH1851 using Tapatalk

  21. #21
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    Sep 2009
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    Saint Helena Island, SC
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    9,567

    Default Re: You may call me a sinner. I just had to adopt to reality.

    Quote Originally Posted by Rich Jones View Post
    YOU'RE LOOKING AT WHAT!?!?


    https://www.yachtworld.com/boats/201...nsole-3470841/
    Fight Entropy, build a wooden boat!

  22. #22
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Christchurch NZ
    Posts
    242

    Default Re: You may call me a sinner. I just had to adopt to reality.

    My oldest and oddest boat is a fibreglass version of a plywood boat. It has a bendy wooden mast and rebuilding that is what got me onto this forum in the first place.
    I have another project that is being a bit of an albatross so I fully understand your choice.

    I'm all for seeing what you are up to.

    Mike

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