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Thread: Jérôme Delaunay Designs, Small 14' Scow

  1. #1
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    Default Jérôme Delaunay Designs, Small 14' Scow

    Hello,

    Was wondering if anyone had any opinions on Jerome Delaunay designs. I'm thinking about building the Scow 420, 14' sailboat as my first boat project. I've been able to find very little on the boats, but the plans are free on his website. I'm drawn to the design for a couple of reasons,


    1. it seems easy and quick to build (Please correct me if I am wrong)
    2. I live right below Atlanta, GA. So while I can make it to the ocean, it is a little over 3 hours away. So I'll be on lakes mostly and this boat seems designed for lakes/river use.
    3. lots of interior sleeping space, I want to try to spend a night, two at the absolute most, on board. I understand this will essentially be camping, and am not looking for luxury.
    4. Junk rigs are cool


    https://www.nautline.com/sailboat_plywood_plans.php#420



    I had a couple of questions for someone maybe more familiar with small scows. How easy is this to capsize and can I do anything to make it less likely to capsize?

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Jérôme Delaunay Designs, Small 14' Scow

    For the purposes you mention, seems like a good fit. It is not a sea boat. Jerome is also building a 5.95m sharpie to his own design suitable for the trans Atlantic Jester Challenge, its not shown on his website as i believe he is making the plans up as he goes along, to some extent. I have nothing against box boats, as long as one excepts there are compromises involved, you can always move on to more complex builds at a later stage if the interest is there.

  3. #3
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    Default Re: Jérôme Delaunay Designs, Small 14' Scow

    I think leeboards would be a better design solution than the permanent low aspect keels, inorder to keep the space inside for sleeping. It will point higher upwind and have even less draft. Were you looking at the 4ft beam or 5ft beam version? She's a very narrow boat at 4ft, so you wouldn't have far to reach. Normal good sailboats are 6ft at 14ft, sail and oar 5ft for better rowing.

    So do you like scows/ pram bows? Take a look at this one...it's not going to take long to build either, will sail very well and give you usefull interior space for weekending. Gartside's design 215.



    The plans were published in a past Watercraft if you want to look at it in detail. That's a boat that will give alot more back than the trouble it took to build.

    If you need shorter...a SCA/ Welsford Scamp with tent would do it.

    Last edited by Edward Pearson; 02-25-2019 at 12:08 PM.

  4. #4
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    Default Re: Jérôme Delaunay Designs, Small 14' Scow

    As mentioned above, there are quite a few recent designs that are similar -- and have larger numbers of builders / sailors, often with active web and/or email forums. The plans may cost a tiny fraction of the overall build cost, but that often includes active assistance from the designer and other builders.

    The OZ Goose is a box boat with quite a following, easy to get sails and hardware for and being actively raced overseas -

    https://www.duckworks.com/product-p/oz-goose-id.htm

    "The enemies of reason have a certain blind look."
    Doctor Jacquin to Lieutenant D'Hubert, in Ridley Scott's first major film _The Duellists_.

  5. #5
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    Default Re: Jérôme Delaunay Designs, Small 14' Scow

    For a first boat, besides the design being a proven entity and the availability of active builders and sailors.

    Imho the number one issue is part-count. The fewer parts the fewer mistakes, the (much) faster to build.

    The second is the quality and completeness of the plans.

    For example the plans by Michael Storer for his OzGoose (12 ft) are $36USD and are considered by many to be a master class in boat building.
    https://www.storerboatplans.com/

    If you cannot afford $36 to build your first boat correctly - you might want to rethink the project. Just saying.

  6. #6
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    Seattle
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    Default Re: Jérôme Delaunay Designs, Small 14' Scow

    Quote Originally Posted by jonnisan View Post
    Hello,

    Was wondering if anyone had any opinions on Jerome Delaunay designs. I'm thinking about building the Scow 420, 14' sailboat as my first boat project. I've been able to find very little on the boats, but the plans are free on his website. I'm drawn to the design for a couple of reasons,


    1. it seems easy and quick to build (Please correct me if I am wrong)
    2. I live right below Atlanta, GA. So while I can make it to the ocean, it is a little over 3 hours away. So I'll be on lakes mostly and this boat seems designed for lakes/river use.
    3. lots of interior sleeping space, I want to try to spend a night, two at the absolute most, on board. I understand this will essentially be camping, and am not looking for luxury.
    4. Junk rigs are cool


    https://www.nautline.com/sailboat_plywood_plans.php#420



    I had a couple of questions for someone maybe more familiar with small scows. How easy is this to capsize and can I do anything to make it less likely to capsize?
    That boat would slide off to leeward, and it's not a good rowboat, so getting home after a sail to leeward could be painful. I wouldn't build a 14 footer with a cabin, use a boom tent if you want to sleep aboard.

  7. #7
    Join Date
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    Padanaram, MA USA
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    Default Re: Jérôme Delaunay Designs, Small 14' Scow

    Quote Originally Posted by johnw View Post
    That boat would slide off to leeward, and it's not a good rowboat, so getting home after a sail to leeward could be painful. I wouldn't build a 14 footer with a cabin, use a boom tent if you want to sleep aboard.
    I’d fear that it might be a better camping casket than a sailboat.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2019
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    Jonesboro, GA
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    Default Re: Jérôme Delaunay Designs, Small 14' Scow

    Hey guys thanks for all the replies! I've got some more to think about now, but I will probably be looking into a more proven design. Potentially the Oz Goose or something similar. I appreciate the feedback!

  9. #9
    Join Date
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    Seattle
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    Default Re: Jérôme Delaunay Designs, Small 14' Scow

    Quote Originally Posted by jonnisan View Post
    Hey guys thanks for all the replies! I've got some more to think about now, but I will probably be looking into a more proven design. Potentially the Oz Goose or something similar. I appreciate the feedback!
    Hey, it's what we do!

  10. #10
    Join Date
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    Northern Europe
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    Default Re: Jérôme Delaunay Designs, Small 14' Scow

    How about his new TenTen 425? Seems to have the capsize risk sorted out.



    A bit more capable than some and more suited to some coastal sailing. I was thinking his original TenTen would be improved with a small cockpit, and here it is.

  11. #11
    Join Date
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    central cal
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    Default Re: Jérôme Delaunay Designs, Small 14' Scow

    If you like goofy little square boats, you need a Gorfnik. It's based on the Puddle Duck Racer, so you can always race it, too. Simple, well sorted, proven design that is fun, if you're the right type.

    Peace,
    Robert

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