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Thread: Torqueedo electric motors: Pros and cons?

  1. #36
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    Narellen, NSW, Australia
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    Default Re: Torqueedo electric motors: Pros and cons?

    Well I've just bought the Torqeedo 1003CL that's the bigger battery and long shaft option as well as the forward control rather than tiller.
    I took it out today for an extended test run and am very happy with it. It's still a bit noisy but not as much as petrol by any means.

    My boat is the Iain Oughtred Tammie Norrie 15 foot and it maxed out at 6 knots (this is something the Torqeedo has over the Epropulsion, it gives gps derived speed and range) at around 3 to 4 knots most of the time it was using a relatively small amount of power. All up I did 17 Km and had about 30% charge left.

    The pics show the readout at various speeds:-

    Top figure = % charge in battery
    2nd figure shows range in Km but can be Nm or miles
    3rd figure shows speed in knots but can be Km of MPH
    4th figure shows power consumption in watts

    20190227_154419.jpg20190227_154923.jpg20190227_155136.jpg20190227_180852_LI (2).jpg20190227_180918_LI.jpg

  2. #37
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    Default Re: Torqueedo electric motors: Pros and cons?

    Yesterday we took a short boat tour of the San Antonio "Riverwalk" area. The boats are around 25' I'd guess, maybe 10' beam. basically aluminum barges. The whole fleet of them are powered by Torqueedo drives. I couldn't see what model, because they are recessed well underneath the stern. I asked the driver about them, and he says he loves them, way better than the old CNG engines they used to use. They use a Tesla battery package, and they run all day on a single charge.

    Tom

  3. #38
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    Apr 2009
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    Default Re: Torqueedo electric motors: Pros and cons?

    Quote Originally Posted by moTthediesel View Post
    Yesterday we took a short boat tour of the San Antonio "Riverwalk" area. The boats are around 25' I'd guess, maybe 10' beam. basically aluminum barges. The whole fleet of them are powered by Torqueedo drives. I couldn't see what model, because they are recessed well underneath the stern. I asked the driver about them, and he says he loves them, way better than the old CNG engines they used to use. They use a Tesla battery package, and they run all day on a single charge.

    Tom
    Probably Torqueedo's 40hp inboard system. $24,000.
    I was born on a wooden boat that I built myself.

  4. #39
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    Default Re: Torqueedo electric motors: Pros and cons?

    I'm also looking at E-Tech pods. A bit less then Torqueedo and it has a nice sturdy 15' bronze prop. I'll be calling them tomorrow for more info.
    I was born on a wooden boat that I built myself.

  5. #40
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    Dec 2009
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    Frankfort, MI
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    Default Re: Torqueedo electric motors: Pros and cons?

    Anybody have updates? Like Rich, I'm completely stunned by the pricing of these things, but even allowing for that the idea of electric propulsion just doesn't want to leave my head...

    Jeff C

  6. #41
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    Jun 2010
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    PNW, an island west of Seattle
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    Default Re: Torqueedo electric motors: Pros and cons?

    Just for consideration...Torqeedo has issued a recall of batteries for the model of outboard that I have. I've got two batteries that were manufactured about three years apart. Both are being recalled for inspection and possible repair/replacement. Torqeedo insists that both be returned at the same time. They won't tell me why. I think it's simply to make their paperwork easier. They ship in separate boxes. My motor will be out of service while they have the batteries. Right in the middle of boating season. Their service/customer service has a lot to be desired.

    I'd look hard at any competitors products.

    Jeff

  7. #42
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    Feb 2019
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    Narellen, NSW, Australia
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    Default Re: Torqueedo electric motors: Pros and cons?

    Jeff, if they are recalling them it's probably because of fire concerns. Think about it, if you had concerns that someones motor and boat might catch fire would you tell them to keep using one battery while you check the other?

    It's called duty of care and if they let you keep one and it caught fire they'd be in for a law suit based on negligence wouldn't they.

    What will be interesting is how quickly they return or replace them.

  8. #43
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Location
    Guerilla Bay, NSW, Australia
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    28

    Default Re: Torqueedo electric motors: Pros and cons?

    Hi Steve,
    I am building an Oughtred Gannet in Southern NSW - just about to glue the Gardboard on and will need motor power when I get her launched. So I will perhaps get back in contact with you later this year to find out how well your torqueedo has worked for you. Another member of our wooden boat group down here is a torqueedo convert and must admit I do like their quietness relative to and internal combustion engine. Your Norrie looks great btw :-)

  9. #44
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    Feb 2019
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    Narellen, NSW, Australia
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    Default Re: Torqueedo electric motors: Pros and cons?

    Thanks Neil, happy to do a demo cruise

  10. #45
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    Sep 2009
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    Default Re: Torqueedo electric motors: Pros and cons?

    Quote Originally Posted by Rich Jones View Post
    I'm also looking at E-Tech pods. A bit less then Torqueedo and it has a nice sturdy 15' bronze prop. I'll be calling them tomorrow for more info.
    I saw these at the MBBS. They looked good. Much heavier duty looking than the Torqeedo.
    Fight Entropy, build a wooden boat!

  11. #46
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    Apr 2009
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    Default Re: Torqueedo electric motors: Pros and cons?

    Quote Originally Posted by Reynard38 View Post
    I saw these at the MBBS. They looked good. Much heavier duty looking than the Torqeedo.
    I ordered one and it should be arriving any day now. Once it's installed, I'll report back on the results.
    I was born on a wooden boat that I built myself.

  12. #47
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    Jun 2010
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    Default Re: Torqueedo electric motors: Pros and cons?

    Quote Originally Posted by Steve TN 15 View Post
    Jeff, if they are recalling them it's probably because of fire concerns. Think about it, if you had concerns that someones motor and boat might catch fire would you tell them to keep using one battery while you check the other?

    It's called duty of care and if they let you keep one and it caught fire they'd be in for a law suit based on negligence wouldn't they.

    What will be interesting is how quickly they return or replace them.

    Maybe. But the actual wording in their email suggests otherwise. No matter. My main point is due to this matter as well as others I've encountered with the motor, I would hesitate purchasing this motor again. I am very happy to see that competition in this marketplace is happening. The desire for electric propulsion is only going to grow.

    Jeff

  13. #48
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    Apr 2005
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    Hills of Vermont, USA
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    Default Re: Torqueedo electric motors: Pros and cons?

    Quote Originally Posted by jpatrick View Post
    Maybe. But the actual wording in their email suggests otherwise. No matter. My main point is due to this matter as well as others I've encountered with the motor, I would hesitate purchasing this motor again. I am very happy to see that competition in this marketplace is happening. The desire for electric propulsion is only going to grow.

    Jeff
    Recalls suck. No one likes them - not the customer, as they can't use the product while it's being checked/fixed - but even more the mfr, as 1) it hurts their reputation & 2) costs them a ton of money. Just think how much they are paying to have all those batteries shipped back & forth - much less how much they may spend on replacements.

    Would you rather they just ignored the whole issue?
    "If it ain't broke, you're not trying." - Red Green

  14. #49
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    Sep 2006
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    Seattle
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    Default Re: Torqueedo electric motors: Pros and cons?

    I bought a first-generation Torqeedo outboard in 2008 for the Devlin Winter Wren I had just completed. In its first year it failed frequently and required three repairs under warranty. After the warranty expired it continued to fail intermittently over the next year—problems in the controller, not the motor itself—and it stranded me on windless evenings three or four times half a mile or more out of the marina.

    I wrote several letters to Torqeedo's U.S. headquarters requesting a full refund, partial refund, or exchange—some form of redress, since I had an obvious lemon. They said, essentially, it's out of warranty, so it's your problem. I asked the local chandlery where I'd bought it if they would help by exerting some business pressure on Torqeedo. But the chandlery had recently quit carrying the line, and they were unwilling even to try to help.

    I gave the motor away (it was running, at least temporarily, at the time) and bought a Tohatsu outboard to replace it. Noisy, but it has run flawlessly for five years.

    The early Torqeedos were obviously poorly engineered, with noisy gearboxes, flimsy construction, and overly complex controllers that were subject to frequent problems in the marine environment. From what I've read and seen in examining Torqeedos in the stores, the current generation has been improved substantially. But because of the company's attitude of total indifference to a customer who was having ongoing problems, I would never consider buying one of their motors again.

    In my opinion, they also remain incomprehensibly expensive. I recently launched a larger Devlin sailboat (the Song Wren, 21' LOA and 2800 lb) and bought a new Yamaha 8 hp outboard for it for $2300. The equivalent Torqeedo Cruise 4.0 lists for $4500, not counting batteries. The two-cyl Yamaha is remarkably quiet and efficient, and will push this boat to its hull speed at a little less than half throttle. Marine electric power is a great idea in principle, but in practice it doesn't yet make economic sense.

  15. #50
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  16. #51
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    Default Re: Torqueedo electric motors: Pros and cons?

    Just installed my new E-Tech motor. Seems to work fine.
    IMG_4701.jpg
    I was born on a wooden boat that I built myself.

  17. #52
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    Narellen, NSW, Australia
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    Default Re: Torqueedo electric motors: Pros and cons?

    I saw it on FB, love the boat and the propulsion system

  18. #53
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    Mar 2017
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    Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
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    Default Re: Torqueedo electric motors: Pros and cons?

    Anyone had any experience with Elco? I like that their outboards look like normal outboards but haven’t seen one in person

  19. #54
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    Huntsville, AL
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    Default Re: Torqueedo electric motors: Pros and cons?

    Quote Originally Posted by timcooke View Post
    There is a new model of the Travel 1003 on the Torqeedo website. It is direct drive and rated as 33db. It says it has 10% more power. Competition is indeed a good thing. From reading the proboat article above on Torqeedo, they had to use an 8:1 reduction gear to get the propeller spinning slowly enough. That is the difference in sound. There must be slow revolving motors available now that weren't available when they started off.
    That's interesting since Minn Kota has had direct drive motors for decades. Minn Kotas run extremely quietly. It is so quiet that I can tell it's running only by the fact that the boat is moving or the ammeter shows current flowing.
    Will

  20. #55
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    Hyannis, MA, USA
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    Default Re: Torqueedo electric motors: Pros and cons?

    The competition between Torqueedo and E-Tech is wonderful. The folk at First Light are working with Torqueedo because they feel the units are generally more reliable and robust and because (pushed by innovations from E-Tech) the newest Travel 1103CS is quiet.

    A limitation for use on a tender is that recharging from the cruising yacht's power may require a bit of jimcrackery.

    The big disadvantage is price. You can buy two or three gas outboards for one electric. Woody at First Light believes that those who can afford the higher prices now should view themselves as making the investment to bring better motors at more reasonable prices in the future.

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