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Thread: BROTM1: About The Isla

  1. #36
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    Default Re: BROTM1: About The Isla

    I presume the stone towers were just decorative by that point?

    The timeline is definitely different. The oldest bridge over the Mississippi anywhere near here was built in 1883.
    "For a successful technology, reality must take precedence over public relations,
    for nature cannot be fooled."

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  2. #37
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    Default Re: BROTM1: About The Isla

    Quote Originally Posted by Keith Wilson View Post
    I presume the stone towers were just decorative by that point?
    Yes, one description I have seen says "..mock-medieval towers that flank the bridge on either side which give it a regal air".
    Every time I see an adult on a bicycle, I no longer despair for the future of the human race. H. G. Wells

  3. #38
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    Default Re: BROTM1: About The Isla

    Quote Originally Posted by Keith Wilson View Post
    Very pretty, but that's what we call a 'creek' 'round here.
    In my neck of the woods its called a "branch."

  4. #39
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    Default Re: BROTM1: About The Isla

    Quote Originally Posted by isla View Post
    Yes, one description I have seen says "..mock-medieval towers that flank the bridge on either side which give it a regal air".
    I like 'em and the bridge itself is really graceful.

    Modern bridges (the straight concrete spans) are just so devoid on any sort of grace. Back in the 30's & 40's here in this colony, the Works Progress Administration (WPA - IOW "make work to help the country get out of the depression") built some wonderful bridges. Everything from wood hiking trails to highways. Here's an example:

    "If it ain't broke, you're not trying." - Red Green

  5. #40
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    Default

    We don't mind whether you are male or female or nonspecific. Nice river. Glenfiddich is my scotch of choice. Is it OK to say Scotch? Or is it supposed to be whiskey?

    Sent from my CPH1851 using Tapatalk

  6. #41
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    Default Re: BROTM1: About The Isla

    Thanks for this first story of many.......John.
    Very nice replies from the gallery as well. Bringing out the best, what a way to start.

    And please! No more scotch (whiskey) threads! I'm too easy to trigger.
    One of the most enduring qualities of an old wooden boat is the smell it imparts to your clothing.

  7. #42
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    Default Re: BROTM1: About The Isla

    Quote Originally Posted by Garret View Post
    I like 'em and the bridge itself is really graceful.

    Modern bridges (the straight concrete spans) are just so devoid on any sort of grace. Back in the 30's & 40's here in this colony, the Works Progress Administration (WPA - IOW "make work to help the country get out of the depression") built some wonderful bridges. Everything from wood hiking trails to highways. Here's an example:
    That's a sweet looking bridge. Must have had some decent old-time stone masons.

    Quote Originally Posted by Phil Y View Post
    We don't mind whether you are male or female or nonspecific. Nice river. Glenfiddich is my scotch of choice. Is it OK to say Scotch? Or is it supposed to be whiskey?

    Sent from my CPH1851 using Tapatalk
    Either/or. Scotch is fine, but around here it's whisky without the 'e'

    Quote Originally Posted by Lew Barrett View Post
    Thanks for this first story of many.......John.
    Very nice replies from the gallery as well. Bringing out the best, what a way to start
    Thanks Lew, I appreciate it. Also thanks to everybody else for chipping in. I thought I would put in a shift, not sure if I can keep it up

    Quote Originally Posted by Lew Barrett View Post
    And please! No more scotch (whiskey) threads! I'm too easy to trigger.
    See above for Whiskey/Whisky
    Every time I see an adult on a bicycle, I no longer despair for the future of the human race. H. G. Wells

  8. #43
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    Default Re: BROTM1: About The Isla

    Very nice........I love rivers and bridges.
    Are there fish in those rivers?
    And are you allowed to fish for them?
    I once thought I was wrong, but I was wrong, I wasn't wrong.

  9. #44
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    Default Re: BROTM1: About The Isla



    The Pere Marquette river. One of my favorites in the area.



    The Betsie river, the closest river to my home.




    The Manistee river, near Cadillac. About 45 minutes from where I live.



    Jeff C
    Last edited by leikec; 02-06-2019 at 05:07 PM.

  10. #45
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    Default Re: BROTM1: About The Isla

    Here I've been looking at the wrong river. How come your small country has two river Islas?

  11. #46
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    Default Re: BROTM1: About The Isla

    I love good stonework, it is in my DNA. Love that bridge.
    Gerard>
    ​Freeland, WA

    Resistance is NOT futile.

  12. #47
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    Default Re: BROTM1: About The Isla

    Quote Originally Posted by Harry Miller View Post
    Here I've been looking at the wrong river. How come your small country has two river Islas?
    I don't know, but the US has two 'Colorado' rivers.

    I live on the 'other' Colorado.
    Rattling the teacups.

  13. #48
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    Default Re: BROTM1: About The Isla

    Sorry Lew, but this is good stuff. Most of the Strathisla single malt gets used to make blended Scotch, but a wee bit gets sent out the door alone. The current bottle is round and clear, like a medicine bottle. This is their older bottle style. It's a very nice unpeated whisky, but getting kind of pricey at $50-$60 USD per bottle.

    strathisla1a.jpg


    And this is the Strathisla Tartan, woven at the Strathmore woolen mills.

    strath2a.jpg
    Last edited by Todd Bradshaw; 02-06-2019 at 06:46 PM.

  14. #49
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    Default Re: BROTM1: About The Isla

    Quote Originally Posted by mmd View Post
    Flying Orca, I Google-Mapped "Saqvaqjuac River" and on the day the satellite flew over, it was frozen and snow-covered, therefore uniformly flat and white. That was a rare condition up there, right? <wink, grin>
    Total fluke!

    And in the spirit of precision, I should point out that the marker that comes up (placed by my brother) is the camp location, which is actually on saltwater. The river is about 5 km NNE of the camp.

    What are you doing about it?




  15. #50
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    Default Re: BROTM1: About The Isla

    Have you read Islandia by Austin Tappan Wright?


    It's one of the great literary escapes— highly recommended.

    The relevant bit is that the title of the hereditary lords (or lairds) of the country is Isla: Isla Fain, Isla Ferrin, Isla Dorn.

    Isla Isla is a trifle awkward, but who am I to judge?
    We're merely mammals. Let's misbehave! —Cole Porter

  16. #51
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    Default Re: BROTM1: About The Isla

    Quote Originally Posted by Robbie 2 View Post
    Very nice........I love rivers and bridges.
    Are there fish in those rivers?
    And are you allowed to fish for them?
    Yes and yes. The Isla has trout but no reputation as a salmon river.
    https://www.wildtrout.org/assets/rep...ver%202014.pdf

    The Deveron and the Spey are both famous salmon rivers..

    The Deveron has a well-deserved reputation as top class salmon river, with runs of spring, summer and often prolific runs of autumn salmon through to its season’s end. It is a river of big fish and each season brings in some fish in the 30lbs (13.6Kg) class. The Deveron has the fifth highest salmon and sea trout rod catch in Scotland and currently holds the record for the heaviest UK fly caught salmon, weighing 61lbs (27.6Kg) and caught by Mrs. Clementina “Tiny” Morison on 21st October 1924.

    http://deveron.org/fishing-the-deveron/

    The River Spey is probably the most famous salmon river in the World. The Spey rises in the Monadhliath mountains to the south of Loch Ness and flows 100 miles northwards to enter the Moray Firth at Spey bay. In its lower course, downstream of Grantown, it is a fast flowing river, providing miles of perfect, and highly sought after, fly fishing water.


    https://www.trout-salmon-fishing.com...river-spey.htm
    Every time I see an adult on a bicycle, I no longer despair for the future of the human race. H. G. Wells

  17. #52
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    Default Re: BROTM1: About The Isla

    Quote Originally Posted by Todd Bradshaw View Post
    Sorry Lew, but this is good stuff. Most of the Strathisla single malt gets used to make blended Scotch, but a wee bit gets sent out the door alone. The current bottle is round and clear, like a medicine bottle. This is their older bottle style. It's a very nice unpeated whisky, but getting kind of pricey at $50-$60 USD per bottle.

    strathisla1a.jpg


    And this is the Strathisla Tartan, woven at the Strathmore woolen mills.

    strath2a.jpg
    Thanks for your input Todd, much appreciated.
    Every time I see an adult on a bicycle, I no longer despair for the future of the human race. H. G. Wells

  18. #53
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    Default Re: BROTM1: About The Isla

    Quote Originally Posted by oznabrag View Post
    I don't know, but the US has two 'Colorado' rivers.

    I live on the 'other' Colorado.
    Yeah... strange, eh?

    And Oregon alone has two 'John Day' rivers. My brother lives on one of them. Weird, eh?
    David G
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    https://www.facebook.com/HarborWoodworks/

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  19. #54
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    Default Re: BROTM1: About The Isla

    My local rivers: the Big Laramie, which is the west boundary of our land—



    And the North Platte, which can be a challenge–

    We're merely mammals. Let's misbehave! —Cole Porter

  20. #55
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    Default Re: BROTM1: About The Isla

    Great thread, Isla!

    Kevin
    There are two kinds of boaters: those who have run aground, and those who lie about it.

  21. #56
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    Default Re: BROTM1: About The Isla

    These rivers are beautiful! I remember when we used to have some too.

    Rick

  22. #57
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    Default Re: BROTM1: About The Isla

    Delightful images and thanks for posting!!!!!



    I can almost imagine a Norse longboat beating it's way up that stream.
    '' You ain't gonna learn what you don't want to know. ''
    Grateful Dead

  23. #58
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    Default Re: BROTM1: About The Isla

    Quote Originally Posted by Todd Bradshaw View Post
    Sorry Lew, but this is good stuff. Most of the Strathisla single malt gets used to make blended Scotch, but a wee bit gets sent out the door alone. The current bottle is round and clear, like a medicine bottle. This is their older bottle style. It's a very nice unpeated whisky, but getting kind of pricey at $50-$60 USD per bottle.
    I didn't really have much hope that the conversation would eschew discussion of aqua vitae for very long anyway. (Nice tartan). Not being peated is a plus in my book.
    One of the most enduring qualities of an old wooden boat is the smell it imparts to your clothing.

  24. #59
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    Default Re: BROTM1: About The Isla

    Quote Originally Posted by Keith Wilson View Post
    Very pretty, but that's what we call a 'creek' 'round here.
    pronounced crik
    Simpler is better, except when complicated looks really cool.

  25. #60
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    Default Re: BROTM1: About The Isla

    Quote Originally Posted by PeterSibley View Post
    Delightful images and thanks for posting!!!!!

    I can almost imagine a Norse longboat beating it's way up that stream.
    It's a bit shallow Peter, except on those occasions I am about to describe..

    Quote Originally Posted by Lew Barrett View Post
    I didn't really have much hope that the conversation would eschew discussion of aqua vitae for very long anyway. (Nice tartan). Not being peated is a plus in my book.
    OK Lew, this next bit has all the emphasis on the aqua

    There’s a Scots saying 'Mony a mickle maks a muckle', or 'Many a mickle makes a muckle', which means “A lot of small amounts, put together, become a large amount”. So muckle means much, or large, big, great etc.

    No discussion of the rivers of north-east Scotland would be complete without mentioning the Great Floods of August 1829.
    Known locally as "The Muckle Spate of 1829", on August 3rd 1829 north-east Scotland recorded the most severe catastrophic flood in modern UK history.

    Pretty much all the rivers from Inverness down to Montrose burst their banks and flooded the adjacent towns and farmland, with major destruction on Speyside.
    If you draw an imaginary line between Inverness and Montrose on this map, everything between the line and the North Sea was affected by flooding. The blue 'balloon' is Huntly, my local town.



    In his book "The Great Floods of August 1829 in the Province of Moray and Adjoining Districts (1830)" Sir Thomas Dick Lauder provides a detailed eyewitness account that can be used to reconstruct the flood. He was a prominent local landowner, and in the book he says.. I remember also the excitement caused by the message that the rivers were up "beyond the memory of man".

    An E book of Lauder's account is available here if anybody is interested..
    https://archive.org/details/greatflo...udgoog/page/n8

    The Old Packhorse Bridge over the River Spey at Carrbridge dates from 1717 and was partly destroyed in the 'Muckle Spate' of 1829

    Every time I see an adult on a bicycle, I no longer despair for the future of the human race. H. G. Wells

  26. #61
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    Default Re: BROTM1: About The Isla

    Quote Originally Posted by isla View Post

    About the time I joined the forum I was running a part-time/hobby woodworking business, called Isla Woodcraft
    i would like to hear more about your woodworking business
    Simpler is better, except when complicated looks really cool.

  27. #62
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    Default Re: BROTM1: About The Isla

    In more recent times the river Lossie has been prone to flooding, and has flooded at least three times while I have lived here. There is a multi-million pound flood alleviation program currently under construction, so hopefully that will help in the future.

    The small town of Dallas is close to the Lossie and this video is from 2014..

    Every time I see an adult on a bicycle, I no longer despair for the future of the human race. H. G. Wells

  28. #63
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    Default Re: BROTM1: About The Isla

    Quote Originally Posted by isla View Post
    I'm perfectly cool about the American river posts. I love rivers, big or small, they all have their charm. I think the Mersey is still my favourite. The upper reaches away from Liverpool are very pretty. You may get a thread about that
    So what took you away from Merseyside to the reaches of Scotland?
    "The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails."
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  29. #64
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    Default Re: BROTM1: About The Isla

    I appreciate that these local floods are really insignificant compared with the sort of destructive flooding you get in Bangla Desh, or the effect of storms like Katrina and Sandy. Our local floods are hardly reported outside of the UK. I just wanted to point out how Straths, or wide shallow river valleys, tend to have dwellings, towns, villages and farmland, close to the river, and essentially built on the flood plain.

    This one from Elgin (also on the Lossie) 2014..

    Every time I see an adult on a bicycle, I no longer despair for the future of the human race. H. G. Wells

  30. #65
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    Default Re: BROTM1: About The Isla

    Thank you for the Tour.

    The River Spey - home of spey casting.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spey_casting
    "Wherever there is a channel for water, there is a road for the canoe. " - Thoreau

  31. #66
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    Default Re: BROTM1: About The Isla

    Rivers and bridges round our way tend to be a bit gnarly.
    Devils Bridge at Kirby Lonsdale is popular for tomb stoning

    Others are more on the picturesque side.

    Birks Bridge on the Duddon.


    Ambleside


    One for Lefty and Carter
    At Cartmel
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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  32. #67
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    Default Re: BROTM1: About The Isla

    Quote Originally Posted by Canoez View Post
    So what took you away from Merseyside to the reaches of Scotland?
    How long have you got?

    A quick run down..

    My wife's family owned a small sail boat, which they sailed around Buzzard's Bay, out to Cuttyhunk, Wood's Hole etc. On my first visit to the US I was taken sailing and I was hooked, I wanted my own sail boat.
    We had a 16ft lapstrake skiff that we used trail down to North Wales for sea fishing, so the first thing I did when we returned from the States was to sell it..

    1974 my wife and I bought a 26ft GRP yacht bare hull. I completed it in our front garden (we lived in a rented apartment in Birkenhead).
    1976 Launched the boat in the Alfred dock on the Birkenhead side of the Mersey and continued to fit it out.
    1977 we sailed it down to North Wales (Conway) and lived on board for a couple of months. Then we moved it around to Cemaes Bay Anglesey, where we used to take the skiff, and lived on it there for the rest of the season.
    1977 - 78 Rented a flat for the winter.
    1978 cruised extensively around Wales and the Isle of Man, and helped a friend work an inshore fishing boat (a Nobby - talk to Nick Peerie Maa). My wife worked in agriculture.
    1979 Sailed up to the Solway Firth, South-West Scotland, and lived on board at Kirkudbright, and in a rented cottage near Lockerbie, while my wife went to agricultural college in Dumfries. Loved it there and wanted to stay, but work was offered down in Surrey, so we left the boat with a friend and went south for a few years.
    1980 - 1983 We had joined a motorcycle club when we lived near Dumfries, and started motorcycle touring from Surrey to visit our friends in the North. We attended a few motorcycle rallies in NE Scotland and the highlands, and vowed to move there ASAP.
    1984 we sold our bikes in Surrey and bought an old Land-Rover. We sold our boat to the friend we left it with, and drove the Landy up to Aberdeenshire in February. We drove around, rough camping in the snow, looking for a cheap cottage to buy or rent. We found a place we could afford, thanks to selling the boat and the bikes, and 35 years later we are still here.
    Every time I see an adult on a bicycle, I no longer despair for the future of the human race. H. G. Wells

  33. #68
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    Default Re: BROTM1: About The Isla

    Quote Originally Posted by Peerie Maa View Post
    Rivers and bridges round our way tend to be a bit gnarly.
    Devils Bridge at Kirby Lonsdale is popular for tomb stoning
    I like gnarly, those bridges are beautiful. Thanks for posting.
    Not sure I'd be up for the tomb stoning though, definitely Darwin award territory that
    Every time I see an adult on a bicycle, I no longer despair for the future of the human race. H. G. Wells

  34. #69
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    Default Re: BROTM1: About The Isla

    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Pless View Post
    i would like to hear more about your woodworking business
    It was more hobby than business, but I used to sell some of my stuff, and people would commission things like garden benches. I still do a bit of bowl turning, but since I had several major surgical operations I've slowed down a bit.

    I posted this in September 2017 in People and Places, which shows some of my work, and quite a lot from other folk too..
    http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthre...ere&highlight=

    And last year I posted this, but it's definitely personal not business
    http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthre...light=wee+pram
    Every time I see an adult on a bicycle, I no longer despair for the future of the human race. H. G. Wells

  35. #70
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    Default Re: BROTM1: About The Isla

    My Mothers family mostly came from that area....Forgue, Bogniebrae.

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