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Thread: Dinghy and Micro Cruisers Adventures or Aspirations

  1. #36
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    Default Re: Dinghy and Micro Cruisers Adventures or Aspirations

    Stoked by some of the canadian options here! If you're looking at Slave, you could also consider Lake Athabasca as an option. All the usual plus sand dunes too. Have to access by river though which adds some complexity.

    Actually I just realized the sailing canoe I'm starting work on is totally small enough to fly in with strapped onto the floats which opens up sooo much. I hadn't even been considering that, but what a super option :-)

    and thanks so much for the south newfoundland idea!!!
    Last edited by Murray Campbell; 02-21-2019 at 09:32 PM.

  2. #37
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    Default Re: Dinghy and Micro Cruisers Adventures or Aspirations

    Quote Originally Posted by The Jeff View Post
    I'm currently building a Ross Lillistone First Mate and I've got a number of Chesapeake Bay area adventures planned. Some are just an overnight thing while others could be a week. Someday I think I'd like to try the Everglades Challenge.


    My folks vacation on Ocracoke Island in NC quite often and I think it would be an adventure to sail and oar my way down the western side of the bay, through the ICW, and then down the Pamlico Sound to meet them there. The trip itself is about 200 miles long, although there's an approximately 50 mile section through the Hampton Roads and ICW where there would be a lot of traffic and sailing might be hard to come by. This trip won't happen this year as I simply don't have enough time for it, but maybe next year.





    I don't know how far I can reasonably expect to row in a day, or sail for that matter. So this summer I plan to do some short weekend trips to get an idea of my boat's capability and hopefully work out the inevitable kinks. Here she is, almost ready to fiberglass the bottom and glue on the decks.


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  3. #38
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    Default Re: Dinghy and Micro Cruisers Adventures or Aspirations

    Quote Originally Posted by Murray Campbell View Post
    Stoked by some of the canadian options here!
    One I contemplated was rafting from Clinton Creek Asbestos’s mine in the Yukon down to Circle City Alaska from memory around 230 some miles. Unfortunatley youth combined with a lack of discipline and far too much partying at the camp torpedoed that adventure.



    Actually I just realized the sailing canoe I'm starting work on is totally small enough to fly in with strapped onto the floats which opens up sooo much. I hadn't even been considering that, but what a super option[/QUOTE]


    Now your talking Murray what a great idea.
    While cruising the Pacific we regularly brainstormed about fitting out an old flying boat and simply cruising all those Atolls by air ,desirably spending hours flying rather than weeks sailing

    Another much more traveled route would be rowing from Whitehorse down the Yukon river to Dawson Creek. The distance is around 350 miles with only one set of rapids regularly run by canoes.

  4. #39
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    Default Re: Dinghy and Micro Cruisers Adventures or Aspirations

    Quote Originally Posted by WI-Tom View Post
    All right, one more post for tonight--the $.59 autopilot, self steering for small boats. I've posted this elsewhere, but it's the best simplest cheapest system I've seen for making the tiller mind itself for hands-off sailing. All you need is a short piece of line and a bungee loop with a plastic ball on it. Once rigged, you can let go of the tiller at any time and it will stay where you position it. And again, at any time, without disengaging the system, you can grab the tiller and steer manually again without adjusting anything. No need to adjust the tension or do anything at all to switch back and forth.

    Here's how it works: first, rig a line under the tiller from gunwale to gunwale. I like to use a fairly small diameter line, in which case you want it tight enough so it lies snug and tight against the deck; in fact, I've found I need so much tension that I use a loop with a modified trucker's hitch (with quick release) to tension this line. With larger diameter line, you can probably use less tension. In the photo below, the bungee is already installed, which has pulled the gunwale-to-gunwale line up off the deck and up to the tiller:

    Attachment 31620

    Then take a bungee loop and wrap it around both the tiller AND the under-tiller line. You want this really tight, so wrap it around as many times as you can, and finish by putting the plastic ball through the loop to tie it off. In the photo below, you can just see the blue plastic ball on the end of the bungee loop. Notice how the tight bungee has pulled the under-tiller line up off the deck and up to the tiller--that's what you want:

    Attachment 31621

    That's it--your self-steering is now ready. The friction of the bungee on the line will hold the tiller firmly in place whenever you let go. But you can steer by hand anytime you want to, without any need to release the system or adjust the tension. You'll still be able to steer easily. Dead simple. In practice, it looks like this:



    Note, though, that your boat will NOT round up and stop sailing with this system in place--it will happily keep sailing away if you fall out. I highly recommend staying aboard.

    It also means a different feel on the tiller, since you're not really feeling the force of weather helm, etc.

    That said, I can't even begin to explain what a game-changer this is for long sailing days. It's really nice to steer when you want, but at any moment be hands-free to eat, pull on a rain jacket, check the chart and compass, whatever. This is probably the best, simplest, cheapest modification you'll ever make to your boat.

    Tom
    Not so different to the older more primitive self-steering gear for model pond yachts.

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    Default Re: Dinghy and Micro Cruisers Adventures or Aspirations

    Subscribing!

  6. #41
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    Just something to cheer up all you poor buggers stuck at home with frozen snow covered lakes or ice cold winds blowing .

    Tammie Norrie’s first sail on the Tweed River with some additional tuning and set up required to the undersized 48sq ft lug sail.

    [IMG][/IMG]

  7. #42
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    Default Re: Dinghy and Micro Cruisers Adventures or Aspirations

    Another aspiration for a sail-and-oar cruise: Quebec's Cote du Nord:

    Cote du Nord.jpg

    An ambitious trip, around 800 miles (more or less) from just east of Quebec City all the way to Blanc-Sablon on the Quebec-Labrador border. But, you'd be on a windward shore generally, and you'd have the prevailing winds and current (if any) with you. Maybe doable. Definitely a big undertaking. You'd pass by Saguenay Fjord (add 100-200 miles to explore, or just make this your final destination for a shorter tip):

    Saguenay Fjord.jpg

    Saguenay Fjord 2.jpg

    And the Mingan Archipelago:

    Mingan.jpg

    From what I know, there's no continuous road that runs along that coast. But, there IS a ferry to Newfoundland from Blanc-Sablon. So, sail to Blanc-Sablon, arrange someone to come over on the ferry and pick you up at the other end. Or leave your boat, ferry over to Newfoundland, fly back to your car, drive back to Newfoundland, ferry over, get your boat, ferry back, drive home. Sounds a bit crazy but I'd seriously consider it. Two months? Maybe 6-7 weeks if you hurry and the weather's good. I'd plan for two months.

    Something neat about thinking of sailing all the way to Labrador in a little boat. Looks like my kind of sailing.

    Tom
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  8. #43
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    Default Re: Dinghy and Micro Cruisers Adventures or Aspirations

    Quote Originally Posted by skuthorp View Post
    Not so different to the older more primitive self-steering gear for model pond yachts.
    The level of tech required looks similar for sure. But that looks like a sheet-to-tiller system to some degree; mine's just a "hold the tiller in place" system, and won't react to the sail or wind shifts.

    Tom
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  9. #44
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    Default Re: Dinghy and Micro Cruisers Adventures or Aspirations

    Quote Originally Posted by auscruisertom View Post
    Just something to cheer up all you poor buggers stuck at home with frozen snow covered lakes or ice cold winds blowing .

    Tammie Norrie’s first sail on the Tweed River with some additional tuning and set up required to the undersized 48sq ft lug sail.

    [IMG][/IMG]
    Do you use any ballast when you sail? I find that 100 lbs of steel shot is not too much for my Alaska--it really behaves much better with some weight down low, up around the front end of the centerboard case. It can be an "exciting" boat to sail solo with no ballast, I've found.

    Tom
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  10. #45
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    Default Re: Dinghy and Micro Cruisers Adventures or Aspirations

    Quote Originally Posted by BOI View Post
    I keep on dreaming about this sail and oar voyaging (did more kayak and canoe tripping when younger) but have to wait till I build a big enough boat, probably several years down the road. Neither the 9.5' all purpose dinghy and the 13.5' mini-faering that I'm working on at the moment will be capable enough to go anyplace serious.

    My brother kayaked the "Eye of Quebec" twice, once around the island in the middle more or less following the red line, and the other time into the "horns" on the north side of the crater. He showed me a lot of pictures and found the wind and resulting 2' high surf on the beach challenging. Not sure about the anchoring near the shore.

    We spent our youth booting about the North Channel in an inflatable motorboat, not too far nor too different from Georgian Bay. My brother is producing guides for areas he is familiar with, that contain the most important info that you need on one page and a map printed on the back, on Tyvek. He did one for St. Joseph Island, which he circumnavigated by kayak, but I'm not sure if he has tackled Manicouagan Lake yet.

    I've spent much time in The North, mostly in Ontario and Labrador, and based on these experiences I suspect the biggest consideration with both the Manicouagan Lake and the Slave Lake destinations may be the blackflies, not mosquitoes. I have spent weeks living and working in a bug net. It is totally doable, and while it diminishes the enjoyment I would still go. Not sure how far the blackflies go out on waterbodies to torment the folks in non-motorized boats.

    My most immediate target area is very close to my house, where the mountains spill into the sea as craggy islands which barely shelter the bay from the prevailing westerlies. A place "in the lee of a continent" in name only; it is pretty darn windy.

    Attachment 31644

    Attachment 31648

    My more distant bucket list item is the south coast of Newfoundland, which I imagine as "Norway without the people".
    https://www.worldwildplaces.com/cape-la-hune This coast was once more populated but it was just too hard to service the remote outports and many were resettled. I plan to go there (even without a boat if I have to) before the last communities fold and the ferry services get discontinued. This already happened to another remote community I wanted to visit, Harbour Deep.

    This south coast was perfectly captured in art http://www.angelabaker.ca/gallery/so...nd-landscapes/

    And then there is the coast of Labrador.
    Attachment 31646Attachment 31647
    OK, wow. I just finally started exploring your links to Newfoundland's southern coast, and I have a new dream destination. Just, wow. If you haven't checked out these links yet, don't miss them. Thanks for posting.

    Tom
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  11. #46
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    Default Re: Dinghy and Micro Cruisers Adventures or Aspirations

    That is an impressive stretch of coastline. It's reputation for thick and constant fog gives me pause.
    -Dave

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    Quote Originally Posted by WI-Tom View Post
    Do you use any ballast when you sail? I find that 100 lbs of steel shot is not too much for my Alaska--it really behaves much better with some weight down low, up around the front end of the centerboard case. It can be an "exciting" boat to sail solo with no ballast, I've found.

    Tom
    I haven’t used ballast so far but will give it a try. Thinking possibly a bag of sand or two.

  13. #48
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    Default Re: Dinghy and Micro Cruisers Adventures or Aspirations

    While finishing a gaff for the big boat I find myself navigating the tricky crossroad of conflicts arising from owning two boats.
    The gaff being finished belonged to a Swan River Couta boat that has since sucomed to the passage of time.
    The spar in question is 15’ long and since it is a two section epoxied hollow section ,it would also make an exelent spar for the Tammie .
    Picured below is the Swan Rivet Couta which where the forerunners of the later built offshore designs as the fisheries where depleted inshore .
    Plenty of sail area for a 23’ foot boat with a 26’2” mast

    [IMG][/IMG]

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    [IMG][/IMG]

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    Quote Originally Posted by Woxbox View Post
    That is an impressive stretch of coastline. It's reputation for thick and constant fog gives me pause.
    Another consideration would also have to include the extraordinary high tides in that part of the world.

    Tom The Cote du Nord would be one awesome dinghy cruising adventure .

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    Quote Originally Posted by auscruisertom View Post
    Another consideration would also have to include the extraordinary high tides in that part of the world.

    Tom The Cote du Nord would be one awesome dinghy cruising adventure .
    I need to find out more about the tides there, too. I think there's a fairly large tidal range, so it would be a big adjustment from tide-free Great Lakes sailing. This guide I found online seems helpful:

    https://www.nauticalmind.com/70936/c...f-st-lawrence/

    A while back I found an earlier version of this guide posted free as a Word doc. PM me if you'd like a copy.

    Tom
    Last edited by WI-Tom; 03-02-2019 at 06:32 PM.
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    Default Re: Dinghy and Micro Cruisers Adventures or Aspirations

    Quote Originally Posted by WI-Tom View Post
    I need to find out more about the tides there, too. I think there's a fairly large tidal range, so it would be a big adjustment from tide-free Great Lakes sailing.

    Tom

    From what I understand the St Lawrence becomes tidal East of Quebec City ,and as one progresses down this mighty river tidal currents would increase with an estimate of encountering 1 to 1.5 kn enroute depending on tides.
    Timing those tides whenever possible will enable a cruiser to cover longer legs weather permitting.

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    If you haven't already read Farley Mowat's "The Boat Who Wouldn't Float," it would -- besides being extremely entertaining -- give a feel for sailing in these waters. In Mowat's case, just about everything that could go wrong did go wrong. And it is, as you might guess by the title, a wooden boat story.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Woxbox View Post
    If you haven't already read Farley Mowat's "The Boat Who Wouldn't Float," it would -- besides being extremely entertaining -- give a feel for sailing in these waters. In Mowat's case, just about everything that could go wrong did go wrong. And it is, as you might guess by the title, a wooden boat story.
    Apparently Mowat himself, who lived in Newfoundland for a time, "went wrong" too, maybe just a case of an outsider not quite fitting in and not totally respectful of the locals. I'm a "come from a way" too, can never become a Newfoundlander. And the place where he lived was Burgeo, which is one of the larger communities and accessible by road, so not quite as isolated as some little places here.

    The south coast has wicked fog, but when it lifts, ahhh! On a trip there one would expect to lose time to weather maybe even half in a sail and oar boat, but people do go there by kayak and in cruising sailboats too. It is fully exposed to the Atlantic, with long fjords where there might be no place to land for many miles.

    I once rented a kayak in Burgeo, they warned me not to go out beyond the lagoon because the area was getting huge swells from a storm somewhere far away. I sat on a headland for a while and watched the waves, very entertaining. I returned to my kayak and it was stranded on the wrong side of many feet of slimy mudflat. The next day I hiked the barrens, saw a caribou, and managed to approach it very closely from downwind. I think it even followed me for a while. They are commonly seen along Burgeo's access road. Burgeo has beautiful beaches in Sandbanks Provincial Park, with few crowds and water way too cold to ever swim in, perfect place for fog bathing...if the fog weren't so cold. There is a place inland along the access road that's a collection of shacks, some sad excuses for summer cabins, but apparently it is out of the fog zone.

    The climatic tree line is at the isotherm line of 13 degree C (55 F) average July temperature, and in many coastal areas of Quebec, Newfoundland and Labrador you often find yourself on the treeless (colder) side of it. Like this place, http://www.burgeonl.com/pic27.htm or that one http://harringtonharbour.ca/

    The Lower North Shore would be gentler in topography, but still wild and remote, with many more islands that could offer shelter from wind and potential bail out spots. The end of the road when coming from the west is Natashquan. There is a ferry from Rimouski, Sept Iles or Natashquan to Blanc Sablon, but it just takes passengers, not cars, and I'm not sure about boats. http://relaisnordik.com/en/ I read a brochure for the area once and apparently some of the communities are mainly English speaking and others French speaking.

    That area would be expected to have lots of black flies, is adjacent to Labrador after all. The NFLD south coast might have some flies, and I'd still pack the bug jacket, but I'd expect less of them.

    Tides are nowhere near what they are in Bay of Fundy:
    Quebec Lower North Shore: https://www.tides.gc.ca/eng/find/zone/6
    South Coast Newfoundland: https://www.tides.gc.ca/eng/find/zone/26

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    Default Re: Dinghy and Micro Cruisers Adventures or Aspirations

    Thanks Claudia for that wonderfull descriptive and fact filled tour of some of Newfoundland’s coastal areas ,and history on Mowat.
    I correspond with a cruising friend now living in Pouleman NS and hear regularly about those severe winters that are hard to imagine for folks living at similar Latitude on the West Coast of Canada.

    Any insight on your present build or projects.

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    Default Re: Dinghy and Micro Cruisers Adventures or Aspirations

    Quote Originally Posted by BOI View Post
    The Lower North Shore would be gentler in topography, but still wild and remote, with many more islands that could offer shelter from wind and potential bail out spots. The end of the road when coming from the west is Natashquan. There is a ferry from Rimouski, Sept Iles or Natashquan to Blanc Sablon, but it just takes passengers, not cars, and I'm not sure about boats. http://relaisnordik.com/en/ I read a brochure for the area once and apparently some of the communities are mainly English speaking and others French speaking.
    Yep, the Lower North Shore looks like the best part to me. I suppose one could drive 1,800 miles up to Natashquan, launch there, and sail to Blanc Sablon. Then what? Leave the boat there, ferry to Newfoundland? (Then how to get the boat, car, and trailer? Catch a flight to Natashquan? Is there such a thing?) Sail back to Natashquan?

    Thanks for the local knowledge.

    Tom
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    There is an airfield at Natashquan and another one about 50km further at Kegashka, which is at the absolute end of the road, and using that place as a launch point would avoid a lengthy sail along an unsheltered coastline. After Kegashka the coastline gets more incised with islands. There are more little airstrips along the way, like Chevery. Blanc Sablon has a bit larger regional airport. Up there that means a real building rather than a shack, but it doesn't mean jet planes. I just googled a few of the ones above, and flying out of them seems to be extremely expensive. Taking the ferry to Newfoundland and flying from there would not be shorter or cheaper.

    There is a fellow with a float plane, he lives in L'Anse au Clair (near Blanc Sablon on the Labrador side). I've been on his plane and it can be chartered but he doesn't do scheduled flights. The operator also owns a remote fishing lodge on St. Pauls River on the Quebec side 709 931 2196. I wouldn't count on transporting an Alaska strapped to a float plane pontoon but have seen canoes transported that way so it may be worthy of investigation.

    First step might be emailing the Lower North Shore ferry to check if they take boats.

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    Thanks for the thoughts. I was more thinking that I'd be likely to launch in Natashquan (or Kegashka), leave the boat in Blanc Sablon at the end of the voyage, fly back to Natashquan (looks like $700+), then drive the car & trailer 1,300 miles through Labrador City and Goose Bay back to Blanc Sablon, get the boat, catch the ferry to Newfoundland and drive home from there.

    Looks like 30 miles sailing from Natashquan to Kegashka, with a potential stopover 5 miles out of Natashquan just south of Pointe-Parent. Or drive to Kegashka and launch there.

    I doubt I'll do this trip this summer, but all this talk has got me thinking for sure... And by launching so far east and skipping the upper Cote Nord, there might even be time to continue northward a little bit into Labrador if a guy were so inclined... If you drove back to Natashquan via Goose Bay instead of ferrying the car & trailer to Newfoundland, you might launch again there for another brief cruise if the weather were good and you had the time.

    And you'd drive right past the Eye of Quebec to check that out on the way...

    Tom
    Last edited by WI-Tom; 03-17-2019 at 07:28 PM.
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    I managed to complete a lengthier rowing trip after the outboard developed a fuel problem prior to crossing the Currumbin bar. Rowing the 5km round trip also paid dividends landing a nice Spotted Mackrell while fishing on Palm Beach reef.

    [IMG][/IMG]

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    Default Re: Dinghy and Micro Cruisers Adventures or Aspirations

    Very late to this thread.

    Much food for thought.

    A couple of years ago my wife and I did a short fly-in & driving holiday to Yellowknife in September. I also was intrigued with the idea of potentially trailering my boat up there for a few weeks of sail and oar.

    However, what gave me pause, despite the five sunny days we had when were there was two things:
    1. For four days the wind blew non-stop out of the south at about 35 knots. The bay in front of Yellowknife was something to behold, with all that fetch. There was nobody moving on the water. Don't know how typical that was, but clearly you'd have to build in a lot of time to be held up by weather - it's a BIG lake.
    2. Biting flies, which were, counter-intuitively, worst near the water, not inland. The locals called them sand flies but they appeared to me to be the same as the good old biting black flies of the Canadian Shield that I grew up with. They were absolutely ferocious. We did one hike that was marvelous over some of the most amazing rounded lichen-covered rock you've ever seen, but practically got eaten alive when the trail got down to a small lake.

    These caveats notwithstanding, I expect it would be an amazing trip if could could find work-arounds.
    Alex

    "“He was unfamiliar with the sea and did not like it much: it was a place that made you cold and wet and sick” " Nevil Shute, Trustee From the Toolroom

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    Default Re: Dinghy and Micro Cruisers Adventures or Aspirations

    Quote Originally Posted by AJZimm View Post
    Very late to this thread.

    Much food for thought.

    A couple of years ago my wife and I did a short fly-in & driving holiday to Yellowknife in September. I also was intrigued with the idea of potentially trailering my boat up there for a few weeks of sail and oar.

    However, what gave me pause, despite the five sunny days we had when were there was two things:
    1. For four days the wind blew non-stop out of the south at about 35 knots. The bay in front of Yellowknife was something to behold, with all that fetch. There was nobody moving on the water. Don't know how typical that was, but clearly you'd have to build in a lot of time to be held up by weather - it's a BIG lake.
    2. Biting flies, which were, counter-intuitively, worst near the water, not inland. The locals called them sand flies but they appeared to me to be the same as the good old biting black flies of the Canadian Shield that I grew up with. They were absolutely ferocious. We did one hike that was marvelous over some of the most amazing rounded lichen-covered rock you've ever seen, but practically got eaten alive when the trail got down to a small lake.

    These caveats notwithstanding, I expect it would be an amazing trip if could could find work-arounds.
    Alex,

    thanks for the personal knowledge. Four days of 35 knots? Yikes! Definitely don't want to be caught out in that. Bugs I can suffer through, and take some precautions against.

    If I went, I'd be sure to pad my schedule with lots of extra time so I never felt the need to make miles in iffy conditions. I've had to spend up to 3 days ashore, tent-bound, because of high winds on Georgian Bay.

    As far as specifics for Great Slave Lake, I've only found wind conditions online for Yellowknife (obviously they'd be significantly different out on the lake 200+ miles away), where average hourly speeds are listed around 10 mph in July. Not much to go on there. It's a very big, very cold lake, not to be taken lightly.

    Tom
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    Default Re: Dinghy and Micro Cruisers Adventures or Aspirations

    Quote Originally Posted by AJZimm View Post
    Very late to this thread.

    Much food for thought.

    A couple of years ago my wife and I did a short fly-in & driving holiday to Yellowknife in September. I also was intrigued with the idea of potentially trailering my boat up there for a few weeks of sail and oar.

    1. For four days the wind blew non-stop out of the south at about 35 knots. The bay in front of Yellowknife was something to behold, with all that fetch. There was nobody moving on the water. Don't know how typical that was, but clearly you'd have to build in a lot of time to be held up by weather - it's a BIG lake.
    .
    Great to have more adventurers on board.

    And yes 80 miles of fetch would definitely set up some good sized swells although since GSL is a very deep lake at up to 600 m the swells would probably be more developed ,unlike the short steep waves found on shallow lakes such as Lake Winnipeg.

    I spent part of a summer canoeing on Footprint lake Manitoba ,located at 55N and found wind conditions quite moderate with only a few days of strong Southerlies and Westerlies.
    Another advantage would also be the increased daylight at around 61N giving one the opportunity to leave very early before the wind gets up.

  28. #63

    Default Re: Dinghy and Micro Cruisers Adventures or Aspirations

    I have been gone from the forum for a while. This is a great thread. I love the suggestions for cruising grounds. I would like to add a suggestion of my own, Lake Eufala on

    on the Canadian River (which is hundreds of miles from Canada) in Oklakhoma. It is a beautiful area surrounded by woods and low rolling hills. The lake has over six-hundred miles of shore line and good wind most of the time. Insects are usually not a major problem. A small boat can cruise Lake Eufala for a month and never anchor in the same place twice.

    I know the Great Plains do not usually come to mind when thinking of a world class small boat cruising ground, but that is what this place is. The folks who live around there are also world class. Just a suggestion - John
    Last edited by Landlockedvoyager; 03-22-2019 at 02:36 AM. Reason: I needed to correct a typo.

  29. #64
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    Default Re: Dinghy and Micro Cruisers Adventures or Aspirations

    Good to have you back John and may I add your lake looks like an interesting cruising destination.
    Having ridden through Oklahoma while enroute to Mexico in the early seventies I wasn’t even aware Oklahoma had such large bodies of water.

    Annyhow this is what I was up to today fabricating a longer larger diameter mast for the Tammie from some roadside scrapped pergola timber. Don’t look to hard because there are numerous knots and old nail holes, now I need find another lug sail.

    [IMG]find nearest fifth third bank[/IMG]

  30. #65
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    Default Re: Dinghy and Micro Cruisers Adventures or Aspirations

    The Bribie Island Classic Boat Regatta seemed like a good excuse to take the Tammie for an outing.

    Bribie Is measuring 34 kilometres is the smallest and most northerly of three major sand barrier islands protecting Moreton Bay. With miles of protected waterways that are not overly crowded combined with the laid back lifestyle of Island living easily reached by a bridge it is an interesting destinations

    Arriving around dusk due to the Brisbane traffic I set up my campsite on the beach at the boat ramp, not something I would normally consider anywhere on the Goldie.

  31. #66
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    Default Re: Dinghy and Micro Cruisers Adventures or Aspirations

    [IMG][/IMG]

  32. #67
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    Default Re: Dinghy and Micro Cruisers Adventures or Aspirations

    Some of the 74 entries lined up adjacent to the boat ramp.

    [IMG][/IMG]

  33. #68
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    Default Re: Dinghy and Micro Cruisers Adventures or Aspirations

    Preparing to launch in preparation for the Pumicestone Passage Cruise a distance of around 6 miles ,sailing conditions encountered where light SE winds with a flooding tide pushing the fleet.

    [IMG][/IMG]

  34. #69
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    Default Re: Dinghy and Micro Cruisers Adventures or Aspirations

    My Tammie with it’s undersized lug sail being passed by most of the larger vessels.

    [IMG][/IMG]

  35. #70
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    Default Re: Dinghy and Micro Cruisers Adventures or Aspirations

    Lunch at Toorbul was welcomed by several hundred hungry entrants provided courtesy of the Council.
    The return passage to the Pacific Harbour Star Marina proved challenging for many craft,with the fickle head winds and strong tidal flows.
    I arrived at the head of the fleet being forced to row sail the 6 miles back to the marina unable to make much headway otherwise.

    [IMG][/IMG]

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