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Thread: Frying pans

  1. #1
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    Default Frying pans

    My large no stick pan is showing signs of wear.

    A variety of types are on the market.

    Anyone got a preference?
    How do we form a mutiny? Our new captain is navigating poorly.

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Frying pans

    I prefer cast iron. But the new ceramic coated non-sticks work very well.

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    Default Re: Frying pans

    Depends on what you plan to do with it.

    If just frying there's a lot to be said for a cast iron skillet - but if you plan to add a can of tomatoes then something else is called for.
    Creationists aren't mad - they're possessed of demons.

  4. #4
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    Default Re: Frying pans

    I use cast iron because I have a lovely Green Cheek Conure I do not wish to poison
    "If you think you are too small to make a difference, try sleeping with a mosquito"

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  5. #5
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    Default Re: Frying pans

    Those Teflon pans are.... Teflon. They might make us sick.
    SS on the boats , cast iron and ss at home. No Teflon.No aluminum
    Last edited by wizbang 13; 01-31-2019 at 05:41 PM.

  6. #6
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    Default Re: Frying pans

    For really hot cooking, I use cast iron. For moderate heats, I like my Swiss Diamond frying pan.
    "The future is already here it's just not very evenly distributed." William Gibson

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    Default Re: Frying pans

    Quote Originally Posted by P.I. Stazzer-Newt View Post
    Depends on what you plan to do with it.

    If just frying there's a lot to be said for a cast iron skillet - but if you plan to add a can of tomatoes then something else is called for.
    You *can* cook acidic things in cast iron, but for short periods of time and not that often.
    "The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails."
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  8. #8
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    Default Re: Frying pans

    I use a sheet steel pan, very old, which I inherited from the daughter of a very old man. It can be cured, sort of the way cast iron is cured, and holds heat very evenly on my gas stove.

    I also use an aluminum pan after the French crepe style with curved, sloped sides, almost exclusively for making such very thin pancakes and rolling them with fillings. It is quite old, maybe 40 years or so, and pitted, but still makes a nice butter patina suitable for crepes, and especially for the nifty toss which is involved in flipping them. Very light weight and easily handled with a single wrist.

    I also have a non-stick-coated enamelled cast iron pan suitable for bouillabaise or similar chicken stews, but it is very heavy and I rarely use it. It has a sheet steel lid. For smaller quantities I have a cast iron enamelled boat-shaped pan which goes from stove to oven. Unfortunately, it has no lid, so I waste aluminum foil making a lid when I use it.

    All the saucepans and kettles in my kitchen are Revere Ware, except my canner, which is heavy cast aluminum.
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  9. #9
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    Default Re: Frying pans

    No adversary is worse than bad advice.

  10. #10
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    Default Re: Frying pans

    We had some very good ones (Calphalone) and ruined one by cooking potatoes in it. Another eventually started flaking off, which is not good for your health. Now we buy cheap and treat them as throwaways and get new ones.

  11. #11
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    Default Re: Frying pans

    But if you really want safe, learn to pay attention while cooking so your oil doesn't burn.
    A society predicated on the assumption that everyone in it should want to get rich is not well situated to become either ethical or imaginative.

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    Default Re: Frying pans

    Quote Originally Posted by wizbang 13 View Post
    Those Teflon pans are.... Teflon. They might make us sick.
    SS on the boats , cast iron and ss at home. No Teflon.
    Same here, I much prefer cast iron,2 of mine are older Chinesese output and excellent.
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  13. #13
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    Default Re: Frying pans

    Yes.

    Second the notion no Teflon, bad juju. What you want is ceramic no stick. We just bught a wonderful deep pan that is ceramic no stick, and it cooks amazingly evenly. By Ecolution.
    Gerard>
    ​Freeland, WA

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  14. #14
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    Default Re: Frying pans

    Quote Originally Posted by P.I. Stazzer-Newt View Post
    Depends on what you plan to do with it.

    If just frying there's a lot to be said for a cast iron skillet - but if you plan to add a can of tomatoes then something else is called for.
    This^
    With cast iron, acidic foods will ruin the seasoning your grandmother spent a lifetime getting there.
    Another danger to the seasoning on cast iron is teen daughters trying to "go the extra mile" on kitchen duty so they can hit you up for some mall cash. Damn thing was so clean I had to throw it out and start over.
    Sam Bach

  15. #15
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    Default Re: Frying pans

    Speaking of cast iron pans... I just bought a Lodge cast iron 14" wok (Amazon $49 and decently pre-seasoned). It takes a while to heat up, but doesn't start to cool off every time you dump something else in there.

    wok.jpg

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    Default Re: Frying pans

    Quote Originally Posted by Todd Bradshaw View Post
    Speaking of cast iron pans... I just bought a Lodge cast iron 14" wok (Amazon $49 and decently pre-seasoned). It takes a while to heat up, but doesn't start to cool off every time you dump something else in there.

    wok.jpg
    What's the bottom look like? Would it work on a flat cooktop?
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  17. #17
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    Default Re: Frying pans

    Recently, I have had good success with stewing things in my cast iron dutch oven. Stew, chili, curries, pasta sauce. I am not sure what I am doing differently, but the seasoning seems to survive.

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    Default Re: Frying pans

    Quote Originally Posted by robm View Post
    Recently, I have had good success with stewing things in my cast iron dutch oven. Stew, chili, curries, pasta sauce. I am not sure what I am doing differently, but the seasoning seems to survive.
    Well, you've likely got a good cure in it to start with and you maintain the cure by cleaning it properly and applying oil after every cleaning.
    "The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails."
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  19. #19
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    Default Re: Frying pans

    Yes, it has a thick flat area about 5.5" in diameter.

    wok-bot.jpg

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    Default Re: Frying pans

    I wish I could use cast iron - I miss it. Long story short - hemochromotosis - too much iron in the blood. According to my doc, one meal of ingredients with no iron (or little) cooked in a cast iron pan = several pounds of red meat as far as iron in the food goes.

    Approx 60% of males of northern European descent have it btw - and it can do joint, liver & kidney damage.
    "If it ain't broke, you're not trying." - Red Green

  21. #21
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    Default Re: Frying pans

    How about the enameled pans? They should be ok, as long as the coating is sound?

    60% seems high. The disease is 1 in 300 in Canada, and there are a lot of males of northern European descent living here! Even as carriers, that figure seems high.
    Last edited by robm; 01-31-2019 at 05:15 PM.

  22. #22
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    Default Re: Frying pans

    Quote Originally Posted by robm View Post
    How about the enameled pans? They should be ok, as long as the coating is sound?

    60% seems high. The disease is 1 in 300 in Canada, and there are a lot of males of northern European descent living here! Even as carriers, that figure seems high.
    I would think an enameled pan would be ok - but nothing cooks like cast iron.

    That's what my doc said - but I haven't verified it. People also get it at varying levels - some of which are harmless.
    "If it ain't broke, you're not trying." - Red Green

  23. #23
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    Default Re: Frying pans

    So? All my Copco ware is enamelled cast iron. The enamelling has done amazingly well for 50 years of use and washing.
    A society predicated on the assumption that everyone in it should want to get rich is not well situated to become either ethical or imaginative.

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  24. #24
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    Default Re: Frying pans

    Quote Originally Posted by elf View Post
    I also use an aluminum pan after the French crepe style with curved, sloped sides, almost exclusively for making such very thin pancakes and rolling them with fillings.
    well yeah, that makes sense
    Simpler is better, except when complicated looks really cool.

  25. #25
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    Default Re: Frying pans

    Thanks all
    How do we form a mutiny? Our new captain is navigating poorly.

  26. #26
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    Default Re: Frying pans

    We just got a glass top range. The black cast iron went to the boat or the kids. The new cast iron is enameled. So far, I really like it
    Elect a clown expect a circus

  27. #27
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    Default Re: Frying pans

    Quote Originally Posted by Todd Bradshaw View Post
    Speaking of cast iron pans... I just bought a Lodge cast iron 14" wok (Amazon $49 and decently pre-seasoned). It takes a while to heat up, but doesn't start to cool off every time you dump something else in there.

    wok.jpg
    that looks great for the Weber

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  29. #29
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    Default Re: Frying pans

    I purchased these fry pans about a year ago and the work very well. Williams Sonoma Professional Ceramic Nonstick Fry Pan Set. The two pans 91/2 " and 11" are a set on sail for $59.00. I think you will like them.
    Jim McGee

  30. #30
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    Default Re: Frying pans

    Well, I'll be one of few who would admit to using teflon nonstick pans.

    Teflon is inert, and not digestible. Like swallowing a grain of plastic. I am not concerned about ingesting a fleck of it now and then.

    We have Calphalon, made in Toledo, Ohio, probably nearing 10 years old. Ours are the "Contemporary". Fairly heavy anodized aluminum. They cook beautifully and last a long while.

    I recommend them, would buy again.

  31. #31
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    Default Re: Frying pans

    For a non-stick skillet, I've been happy with my Swiss Diamond. https://www.swissdiamond.com/

    My 10-in skillet finally snuffed it after more than 10 years (15?) of abuse.
    I would have gotten another one, but nobody local carries them anymore.
    My only real complaint might be that the edge turns up far to abruptly. That make it
    difficult to do the line cook's flip.

    Replace my Swiss Diamond with a ScanPan: https://www.scanpan.com/pans/fry-pans
    Seems to be well-made. Only time will tell if it will hold up like the Swiss Diamon.
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  32. #32
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    Default Re: Frying pans

    Quote Originally Posted by Todd Bradshaw View Post
    Speaking of cast iron pans... I just bought a Lodge cast iron 14" wok (Amazon $49 and decently pre-seasoned). It takes a while to heat up, but doesn't start to cool off every time you dump something else in there.
    I've used one of these for years. They make a glass lid as well, it works great for popcorn.

  33. #33
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    Default Re: Frying pans

    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Beckman View Post
    I've used one of these for years. They make a glass lid as well, it works great for popcorn.
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  34. #34
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    Default Re: Frying pans

    Quote Originally Posted by L.W. Baxter View Post
    Well, I'll be one of few who would admit to using teflon nonstick pans.

    Teflon is inert, and not digestible. Like swallowing a grain of plastic. I am not concerned about ingesting a fleck of it now and then.

    We have Calphalon, made in Toledo, Ohio, probably nearing 10 years old. Ours are the "Contemporary". Fairly heavy anodized aluminum. They cook beautifully and last a long while.

    I recommend them, would buy again.
    Well, the problem isn’t with the Teflon itself, it is the by-products of the Teflon when it gets overheated - which is not hard to do.
    "The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails."
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  35. #35
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    Default Re: Frying pans

    Quote Originally Posted by Todd Bradshaw View Post
    Speaking of cast iron pans... I just bought a Lodge cast iron 14" wok (Amazon $49 and decently pre-seasoned). It takes a while to heat up, but doesn't start to cool off every time you dump something else in there.

    wok.jpg
    Exactly! That's why a cast iron skillet or wok is superior to the thin carbon steel ones for stir frying or searing on a home burner. A commercial wok burner can keep up, but at home with a weaker burner, you can preheat the pan to store some heat.

    EDIT: I don't like the sand-cast inside finish of the newer cast iron pans, the vintage ones are smoother, machined. I tried a finish sander on mine, but the soft pad surface made it conform too much. So over several weeks I just ground down the inside with a coarse sharpening stone and water until smooth, checking for flatness along the way with a small straight-edge, then re-seasoned it. Oh man, works SO much better. Eggs just slide off.

    HOWEVER... I did some research. Aluminum is 1/3 the density of cast iron but has 2X the specific heat by mass. Thus, a thick aluminum pan that is 3X the thickness of the cast iron will have the same weight and 2X the heat capacity, even better, plus far better heat distribution. Or, an aluminum pan 1.5X the thickness of cast iron will have the same heat capacity, better heat distribution, and half the weight. An anodized aluminum pan can be seasoned, same as cast iron. This will be much less sticky than raw anodizing, sealing the surface, and can be renewed, preserving the surface. An anodized pan that has the anodizing removed (or a bare aluminum pan) can be saved by seasoning. My preferred method is very light coating with oil of preference (just damp), then into oven at least 100 F above oil smoke point. This is too hot for some oven mits, many will burn, so I slide rack out and with an oiled paper towel, wipe on subsequent layers then slide the rack back into oven, and letting it cool before removing or using a silicone pad or two sets of metal tongs.

    My girlfriend has one of the newer nonstick pans, light gray surface, I thumbed my nose at it at first, but actually it works well, very durable, more so than teflon and no fumes I think. But I'd like more thickness, and the "golf divots" in the surface I don't like, they fill with gunk when searing when I want the gunk in the sauce.

    I used to hate stainless surface for frying, but a lot is about knowing how to cook. Meats need to be left alone for a few minutes to "release", just like on a grill. Fried eggs need to be cooked slowly, scrambled fast, to slide off. So overall, I recommend tri-ply stainless steel, preferably thick, as being the most versatile and durable cookware.
    Last edited by Bob (oh, THAT Bob); 02-04-2019 at 06:55 AM.
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