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Thread: Help me rig this sail

  1. #1
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    Default Help me rig this sail

    So my dad built a laughing gull sailboat and then passed away before he could show me how to rig the sail. I canít find anything online to guide me. Itís a single mast. Any help would be awesome. TIA

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Help me rig this sail

    Looks like there are several rigs available for that design. I'd call the Arch Davis Design Group and try to find out what you have: https://www.archdavisdesigns.com/dav...ghinggull.html Their phone info is at the fottom of the page. NICE BOAT! Please post some pics!

  3. #3
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    Default Re: Help me rig this sail


  4. #4
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    Default Re: Help me rig this sail

    Sorry about your Dad.

    Single mast? Could there be a sprit spar laying around somewhere or other parts life a boom or gaff (gunter rig). Definitely drop an email to Arch with a few pictures, he can help sort it out. That will be a versatile boat, would love to see pictures.
    Cheers
    Kent

  5. #5
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    Default Re: Help me rig this sail

    And pull us in with pix of the boat, the sail laid out flat, and any spars you have.

  6. #6
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    Default Re: Help me rig this sail

    Quote Originally Posted by Canoeyawl View Post
    Yea that’s it!

  7. #7
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    Default Re: Help me rig this sail

    Quote Originally Posted by signalcharlie View Post
    Sorry about your Dad.

    Single mast? Could there be a sprit spar laying around somewhere or other parts life a boom or gaff (gunter rig). Definitely drop an email to Arch with a few pictures, he can help sort it out. That will be a versatile boat, would love to see pictures.
    Cheers
    Kent
    Awesome, I’ll write to him. Didn’t know that was an option, thanks!
    heres some from the other day when I was trying to figure it out.
    49CCCF0C-B891-4315-B2B6-3CE3E6E16394.jpg
    Don’t know why this keeps posting sideways

  8. #8
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    Default Re: Help me rig this sail

    Quote Originally Posted by Ian McColgin View Post
    And pull us in with pix of the boat, the sail laid out flat, and any spars you have.
    I’ll take some pics when I get home. On the road for a couple days.

  9. #9
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    Default Re: Help me rig this sail

    Looks pretty good to me. To keep the gaff jaw boom on the mast you can run a simple piece of small cord through the forward ends (drilling a small hole in each if necessary), and tie one end with a loop so you can easily untie it when striking the rig. That's just how my boom is rigged on my dory skiff.

    We'll need more pics of the boom and any hardware in the boat for the mainsheet, and you may want to rig a rope traveler depending on multiple factors.

    Here's a sample photo of a simple rope traveler and mainsheet setup -- YMMV
    "The enemies of reason have a certain blind look."
    Doctor Jacquin to Lieutenant D'Hubert, in Ridley Scott's first major film _The Duellists_.

  10. #10
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    Default Re: Help me rig this sail

    Looks like it was intended to have lacing along the boom, and presumably along the mast as well.

  11. #11
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    Default Re: Help me rig this sail

    The photo from the website shows a loose footed boom ( no laccing) and the luff looks like it might be on a track.
    That sail in the original image is well set.

    edit; Sailmakers have been known to take liberties. An original copy of the plans might be money well spent.

  12. #12
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    Default Re: Help me rig this sail

    Nice Mirror, Thorne. That yours?

  13. #13
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    Default Re: Help me rig this sail


  14. #14
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    Default Re: Help me rig this sail

    Quote Originally Posted by Hugh MacD View Post
    Nice Mirror, Thorne. That yours?
    Nope. I'm **trying** to reduce the size of my fleet, but if expanding it a Mirror would be high on the list. Just wanted a basic rope traveler and mainsheet pic for the OP.

    As Canoeyawl points out above, the mainsail looks to be attached to the mast via sail track, and may not need to be laced to the boom even though the sailmaker / someone installed grommets.
    Last edited by Thorne; 01-24-2019 at 11:28 AM.
    "The enemies of reason have a certain blind look."
    Doctor Jacquin to Lieutenant D'Hubert, in Ridley Scott's first major film _The Duellists_.

  15. #15
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    Default Re: Help me rig this sail

    JKern, that is a lovely boat! Your father was obviously a fine craftsman. As Thorne said, I'd probably nit lace the sail to the boom...I'm a proponent of "loose foot" mains that give you better sail shape. It looks like you need some kind of outhaul system to control tension along the foot (see Thornes "Mirror" pic), and something to secure the tack (lower forward corner) to the boom. It looks like your halyard is tied off around the boom attachment (gooseneck) ? You'll want some kind of cleat alongside the mast for that. Will you be sailing that with your kids? I see two sets of serious reef cringles in the leach of the main. You could rig it with single line reefing so you could reduce sail for their benefit if desired. Again...that's a lovely boat! Enjoy!

  16. #16
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    Default Re: Help me rig this sail

    Actually a loose-footed sail should be rigged loose and a sail attached to the boom along the foot should be used as such. The two are cut differently (to the point where the bottom panel is attached right side up on one and flipped over to be attached essentially upside down on the other). This makes one type curved along the bottom (loose foot) and the other one (laced or boltroped) designed to be anchored straight along the boom, yet both generate similar draft along the bottom third or so of the sail. Running a laced foot as a loose foot seldom produces the proper deigned draft and shape along the bottom, as well as looks really bad to those in the know.

  17. #17
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    Default Re: Help me rig this sail

    Thanks for correcting me Todd! I hadn't thought that through. For information of all, should foot lacing be fairly loose, so the outhaul can be adjusted more easily? Is there a rule of thumb on that?

  18. #18
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    Default Re: Help me rig this sail

    It's funny, but the first really big brain teaser that I came across when learning to make sails (from a book in central llinois with no mentor, or even water around) was a passage about laying out and basting the panels over the full sized lofting on the floor. It was for a sail attached along the boom. The instructions started at the top of the sail and worked downward, basting panels together, and when it got to the bottom panel, it had me lay out and cut the foot roach over the lofting, but leave a fair bit of excess cloth at the luff and leech edges. Then it said to flip the panel upside down and baste the curved foot roach that I had just cut to the straight bottom edge of the panel above it. Then finally cut the new luff and leech edges over the lofting from the excess cloth. I was wondering why in hell would I lay out the panel and then glue and sew it on upside down? As it turns out, that curved-edge-to-straight-edge above it connection is what creates the draft in the lower sail, and the panel's straight edge, which is now on the very bottom of the sail, fits nicely along the straight boom, terminating the draft and making sort of a shelf foot effect.

    For a loose-footed sail, the connection between the bottom panel and the panel above it is essentially straight edge to straight edge (the seam may have a little bit of broadseaming to position draft, but we're not counting that). The foot round is then cut to match the lofting. In order to keep the round from just being a flap (that will flap in use) and to give the sail's bottom a bit of a cupped shape (endplate effect - helping to keep pressure from sneaking around the bottom of the sail and causing loss of lift and power) there will usually be some sort of a seam (vertical or diagonal) crossing the bottom panel. This broadseam is helping to create that cupped bottom shape. I remember once thinking that it was too bad that they ran out of fabric and had to piece that bottom panel together from two pieces, but that seam is actually very important for the sail's shape and lower sail draft.

    I don't know of any foot lacing rules as such, though the sail is certainly cut and shaped as if you will be able to maintain even spacing from foot to boom along the entire length of the foot, and hopefully some outhaul adjustment will still be possible. This may be easier said than done. The problem with foot lacing is that the tension will migrate in use, and sail shape will change somewhat as it does. Some lacing methods (more hitch-like) can reduce that tendency by creating more friction, but it is still going to migrate some and it will make any sort of outhaul adjustment more difficult.

    Unless it causes some sort of stowage/storage problem, I'd much rather see individual robands (simple individual ties, loops with toggles, etc.) at each grommet. The sail-to-boom spacing will remain constant and you have the added bonus of being immune to mass failure if something lets go or breaks, unlike lacing. This is also true up along a gaff on gaff sails, or a lugsail's yard. Migration of lacing messes with the sail's designed upper shape, so it may be convenient, but it's usually not the best option available..

  19. #19
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    Default Re: Help me rig this sail

    I'm going out on a limb here.That sail looks like its rigged back to front.I have never seen a sailmaker's patch anywhere other than at the tack.

  20. #20
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    Default Re: Help me rig this sail

    That was my original thought as well, but even when magnified it gets so pixelated that you can't clearly see the details like batten pockets and edges. If it is, it would pretty much have to be a club-footed jib.

    edit... though I think the panel layout is typical cross-cut for a main, so better photos would help a lot. I've seen sailmakers who used things like red corner patches to identify their sails, but I have never known anybody to put their logo back at the clew.
    Last edited by Todd Bradshaw; 01-24-2019 at 07:02 PM.

  21. #21
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    You want help, give us some help. Like what's the question? You want us to go to the trouble of answering? Go to the trouble of posting some pics. Sad about your dad. It would be cool to finish the job.

    Sent from my CPH1851 using Tapatalk

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