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Thread: Goat island skiff and Tamanu outrigger canoe

  1. #1
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    Default Goat island skiff and Tamanu outrigger canoe

    Hi all, I currently sail a Seasafe Dandy 16, its a british made bilge keeled, fractional rig pocket cruiser. So far it has served me well, its a tough little boat that can take serius beating and im going to keep it for day sailing with my friends and girlfriend. The thing is that I need lighter, nimble craft for wind and human power only. It is going to be used for singlehanded daysailing, weekend expeditions with some short blue water passages and occasional raids.

    I have bought the plans for Goat island skiff and i love the looks and simplicity of that little boat. Its light and fast and seems that it rows almost as good as it sails. The designer is also a great guy and support group is second to none. There is just one thing that concerns me (I could also be overthinking this), when capsized, goat seems to scoop a lot of water and I wonder would I be able to right the boat, board it and bail the water out by myself in a bigger
    seaway.

    Tamanu canoe on the other hand is a bit more involved build than GIS, and i doubt it can
    be as efficently paddled with single blade paddle as GIS can be rowed with pair of long oars.
    What I like a lot about it is a self draining cockpit and versatility of rigs it can be sailed with.
    I also think that the added stability of an outrigger combined with self bailing cockpit would be less tiresome for a sailor on long passages. It looks more blue water capable too.

    Does anyone on this board have experience with those two designs and what do you think
    about importance of self bailing cockpit on overall safety of the boat? Thank you

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Goat island skiff and Tamanu outrigger canoe

    I had to google the canoe.. But the choice between a GIS and that is hardly a comparison? One is a lively, easy to build dinghy, the other an outrigger (ama) boat from the Pacific.
    By the way, welcome to thje forum..
    A2

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    Default Re: Goat island skiff and Tamanu outrigger canoe

    Quote Originally Posted by Andrew2 View Post
    I had to google the canoe.. But the choice between a GIS and that is hardly a comparison? One is a lively, easy to build dinghy, the other an outrigger (ama) boat from the Pacific.
    By the way, welcome to thje forum..
    A2
    Thank you! I know its an apples to watermelons comparison and I like both, just want to find out which one is up to the task. If I build tamanu i would experiment with windsurfer rig so wouldnt have to build mast and spars.

  4. #4
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    Default Re: Goat island skiff and Tamanu outrigger canoe

    I built a Goat a few years ago and found that the swamping issue can largely be solved by boxing in the center thwart. The added volume of air allowed me to right the boat, climb aboard, and sail it to the nearest beach for emptying. The addition of a pair of small plastic hatches in the bulkhead allowed for storage and ventilation there.

  5. #5
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    Default Re: Goat island skiff and Tamanu outrigger canoe

    Quote Originally Posted by Rob Hazard View Post
    I built a Goat a few years ago and found that the swamping issue can largely be solved by boxing in the center thwart. The added volume of air allowed me to right the boat, climb aboard, and sail it to the nearest beach for emptying. The addition of a pair of small plastic hatches in the bulkhead allowed for storage and ventilation there.
    I thought about strapping a flotation bag under the center thwart. So you could not bail the boat en route?

  6. #6
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    Default Re: Goat island skiff and Tamanu outrigger canoe

    Possibly, though most of the water would still be sloshing in the lee bilge. I was happy enough with being able to sail the boat over to a handy beach and dump it. Before I added the extra flotation the boat felt pretty unstable when swamped.

  7. #7
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    Default Re: Goat island skiff and Tamanu outrigger canoe



    In this video it is quite visible how the sheer amount of water in the boat swings the boat like a pendulum from side to side, even in dead calm. The video ends too early to see how the boat most likely turned on its other side.
    I want to be able to right and bail the boat underway alone, cause in the conditions which are most likely to cause capsize
    (wind and waves, duh) I will not be able to take the boat to the beach, as the shore here in Croatia is either rocky or gravel with steep chop slamming into it.

  8. #8

    Default Re: Goat island skiff and Tamanu outrigger canoe

    I love my goat island skiff.
    It is a high performance boat. Big sail, easy to capsize.
    Easy to right, but holds alot of water and is more unstable flooded. Takes a lot of bailing.
    Can be rowed but not a good boat to row in any breeze.
    The gis community have discussed these issues and more flotation helps.
    It is an extremely well thought out design and mods need to be carefully thought out (discuss with designer).
    go well
    wayne
    fremantle
    West australia

  9. #9
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    Default Re: Goat island skiff and Tamanu outrigger canoe

    Quote Originally Posted by Wayne Poulsen View Post
    I love my goat island skiff.
    It is a high performance boat. Big sail, easy to capsize.
    Easy to right, but holds alot of water and is more unstable flooded. Takes a lot of bailing.
    Can be rowed but not a good boat to row in any breeze.
    The gis community have discussed these issues and more flotation helps.
    It is an extremely well thought out design and mods need to be carefully thought out (discuss with designer).
    go well
    wayne
    fremantle
    West australia
    Hi Wayne, I would be rowing the boat only in dead calm so windage is not a problem for me.
    I like the boat the way it is and would only experiment with flotation bags eventually to make
    it float higher in case of capsize.

  10. #10
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    Default Re: Goat island skiff and Tamanu outrigger canoe

    Don't feel alone, I have considered both boats over the years. I built one of Gary's other boats, the Ulua. His plans and support are great! Very well thought out and efficient. I built to plans and ended up right at his designed weight. Still a lot of room for personalizing things like the rig as needed. I've used a simple old sprit rig from an 8' pram dingy, a sunfish sail (which is REALLY big for the 18' Ulua) and have a couple sailboard rigs I want to try this year. Outriggers are fun! Same basic sailing principles, but a lot of get up and go! I have enjoyed paddle steering, but it keeps my handful with the sheet and the paddle. Will try a steering oar if I ever get around to building one, same with adding the rudder. Plus with the Tamanu you have the option of going as a double outrigger if you want to build another hull. That is why I keep looking at it now that I have a couple little kids, though I'm more partial to just strip planking another Ulua hull on my existing molds. My iakos (outrigger beams) cracked when I was out in too much wind with too much sail (Sunfish rig) because I built them with only cedar, I didn't use hardwood skins as specified. I do have a new one on the jig, that I just need a spare hour or so to glue up. I think an outrigger is fun to sail, and maybe even as much fun to tinker with.

    That said, the GIS is an awesome boat that you will be sailing in quicker likely as it is, from all I can see and have heard, a very efficient use of parts and labor. Great sailing, and you could likely take more than one passenger for a day sail. Outriggers are pretty sensitive about weight. I have an old Sunfish hanging under the dock that I take out with my 4 year old, and am thinking the GIS would be a good replacement for it. Fun to sail, but versatile enough to row and putter around with.

    Since I already have an outrigger sailing canoe, I'm more likely to build the GIS one day. But don't think that this apples to watermelons comparison is so far fetched!

    Either way, enjoy!
    Jon
    Building: Ha! I have Toddlers. Just able to get back in the shop and start fixing.
    http://flsail.blogspot.com/
    Built: PK78 dinghy, EasyB canoe, Ulua

  11. #11
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    Default Re: Goat island skiff and Tamanu outrigger canoe

    Quote Originally Posted by flsail View Post
    Don't feel alone, I have considered both boats over the years. I built one of Gary's other boats, the Ulua. His plans and support are great! Very well thought out and efficient. I built to plans and ended up right at his designed weight. Still a lot of room for personalizing things like the rig as needed. I've used a simple old sprit rig from an 8' pram dingy, a sunfish sail (which is REALLY big for the 18' Ulua) and have a couple sailboard rigs I want to try this year. Outriggers are fun! Same basic sailing principles, but a lot of get up and go! I have enjoyed paddle steering, but it keeps my handful with the sheet and the paddle. Will try a steering oar if I ever get around to building one, same with adding the rudder. Plus with the Tamanu you have the option of going as a double outrigger if you want to build another hull. That is why I keep looking at it now that I have a couple little kids, though I'm more partial to just strip planking another Ulua hull on my existing molds. My iakos (outrigger beams) cracked when I was out in too much wind with too much sail (Sunfish rig) because I built them with only cedar, I didn't use hardwood skins as specified. I do have a new one on the jig, that I just need a spare hour or so to glue up. I think an outrigger is fun to sail, and maybe even as much fun to tinker with.

    That said, the GIS is an awesome boat that you will be sailing in quicker likely as it is, from all I can see and have heard, a very efficient use of parts and labor. Great sailing, and you could likely take more than one passenger for a day sail. Outriggers are pretty sensitive about weight. I have an old Sunfish hanging under the dock that I take out with my 4 year old, and am thinking the GIS would be a good replacement for it. Fun to sail, but versatile enough to row and putter around with.

    Since I already have an outrigger sailing canoe, I'm more likely to build the GIS one day. But don't think that this apples to watermelons comparison is so far fetched!

    Either way, enjoy!
    Hi Flsail! Thank you for sharing your expirience with the Ulua, I'm glad I am not the only one
    with dilemma . Ulua is definitely prettier boat than Tamanu but i really dig the simplicity of the three board canoe. I would mostly sail Tamanu or GIS alone, or with my girlfriend for daysailing or camp sailing.

    How does your Ulua handle the rough stuff and is it a stable platform for swimming and sunbathing? I like snorkeling a lot so would like to climb back to the boat without flipping it over.

  12. #12
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    Default Re: Goat island skiff and Tamanu outrigger canoe

    Hello Rogypop,

    I have built a GIS for a cutomer and found it a very good boat to build and sail. Construction time was very fast and without any problems, not to mention the simplicity of the concept and the low price of the materials.

    Sailing it was a dream, fast to rig and on the water, responsive and agile.

    I figured the same disadvantages as mentioned by the other GIS owners. The amount of water in the boat after capsise. The next problem for me was the uncomfortable "butt on the rail" situation when you have to hike out for more than a few minutes.

    I wanted to build a raid boat for myself and to eliminate the problems I designed a similar boat with some modifications to fix these points. (This boat has never been built as I figured out that I need "a little more boat" for a raid in my home waters.) The design is still in my drawing drawer if you are interested.

    Beside other modifications I drew a double bottom to make my boat self bailing. I think this could be done with the GIS too. Wheight penalty would be around 8kg and you will need one more sheet of plywood and two elvström bailers. Ths is nearly the same wheight difference if you go from Okume to Mahagony plywood.

    But be clear, the absolute simplicity of the GIS is lost, expect to add around 30 to 40 hours with this modification.

    The funny thing is ... my personal raidboat is now a 5.6m proa and in the making. I thought that I can design a fast sharpie with a dry storage (and a bunk), like the Michalak AF3. But the wheight of the fully decked Sharpie grew so rapidly on my calculator, that planing speeds (and the fun involved) would be only available with a minimum of 15 knots of wind from the right direction. A proa is much faster in lighter winds.


    IMG_20181025_111149.jpg
    Kea 5.6 - Vaka. First time upside up!


    So that's it for the moment

    Have fun, Michel
    Last edited by luckystrike118; 01-30-2019 at 06:13 PM.

  13. #13
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    Default Re: Goat island skiff and Tamanu outrigger canoe

    I have built and sailed outrigger sailing canoes, and have the plans 9and wood) to build the Tamanu when I can get around to it (my third outrigger is slowly in progress). I am doing things opposite to you -- I wanted to own one monohull sailing boat that I could get three adults on (sometimes) and could also teach my grandson to row and generally fiddle around with. I have looked at the GIS, the CLC Southwester and Northeaster dories, and the B&B CoreSound 17. For myself, I would probably take years to build the more complicated craft (and I looked into having them built for me from the kits, by a professional boat builder, and the materials plus labor was around $20K for CLC SWer, B&B 17, and about $20K to have a dory shop build me a Swampscott Dory -- a bit over my social class :-). The GIS seems to be the only all-round row/sail boat I could imagine finishing in reasonable time not regret the slight expense and space it takes up in my small yard. My only misgivings for the GIS is that it cannot quite be pressed into service for an occasional sleep-aboard boat.

    I think the Tamanu is a great design -- it goes together relatively quickly, it will be a relative fast outrigger (but do not think you will beat beach-cats), it will be sea-worthy if build right, and you could paddle it just fine with two, good enough with one, but if you anticipate I need to get home quickly in a calm, then a 2 hp Honda is easy enough to bring along. It will take two adults just fine, three adults in moderate weather in-shore, but 4 adults not advised (I have gotten this info from an owner much experienced in the Tamanu). -- Wade

  14. #14
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    Default Re: Goat island skiff and Tamanu outrigger canoe

    I'm a big fan of Michael Storer's work, especially his rudders and his optimization of the lug rig. So i now have the best of both worlds with my Tamanu equipped with his rudder, mounted on the side, and a scaled down standing lug rig.

    Gary

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    Default Re: Goat island skiff and Tamanu outrigger canoe

    Quote Originally Posted by luckystrike118 View Post
    Hello Rogypop,

    I have built a GIS for a cutomer and found it a very good boat to build and sail. Construction time was very fast and without any problems, not to mention the simplicity of the concept and the low price of the materials.

    Sailing it was a dream, fast to rig and on the water, responsive and agile.

    I figured the same disadvantages as mentioned by the other GIS owners. The amount of water in the boat after capsise. The next problem for me was the uncomfortable "butt on the rail" situation when you have to hike out for more than a few minutes.

    I wanted to build a raid boat for myself and to eliminate the problems I designed a similar boat with some modifications to fix these points. (This boat has never been built as I figured out that I need "a little more boat" for a raid in my home waters.) The design is still in my drawing drawer if you are interested.

    Beside other modifications I drew a double bottom to make my boat self bailing. I think this could be done with the GIS too. Wheight penalty would be around 8kg and you will need one more sheet of plywood and two elvström bailers. Ths is nearly the same wheight difference if you go from Okume to Mahagony plywood.

    But be clear, the absolute simplicity of the GIS is lost, expect to add around 30 to 40 hours with this modification.

    The funny thing is ... my personal raidboat is now a 5.6m proa and in the making. I thought that I can design a fast sharpie with a dry storage (and a bunk), like the Michalak AF3. But the wheight of the fully decked Sharpie grew so rapidly on my calculator, that planing speeds (and the fun involved) would be only available with a minimum of 15 knots of wind from the right direction. A proa is much faster in lighter winds.


    IMG_20181025_111149.jpg
    Kea 5.6 - Vaka. First time upside up!


    So that's it for the moment

    Have fun, Michel
    Hi, thank you for your advice but I would not like to deviate from plans if I start building GIS. Michael Storer designed a simple self bailing raid sail and oar boat (raid41?) but discarded the idea (I think) cause the boat was prone to right itself after capsize and leave sailor behind. I wish he made the plans available though.

    I like your proa, it reminds me of CLC mbuli proa, another crazy boat I used to daydream about.

  16. #16
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    Default Re: Goat island skiff and Tamanu outrigger canoe

    Quote Originally Posted by wtarzia View Post
    I have built and sailed outrigger sailing canoes, and have the plans 9and wood) to build the Tamanu when I can get around to it (my third outrigger is slowly in progress). I am doing things opposite to you -- I wanted to own one monohull sailing boat that I could get three adults on (sometimes) and could also teach my grandson to row and generally fiddle around with. I have looked at the GIS, the CLC Southwester and Northeaster dories, and the B&B CoreSound 17. For myself, I would probably take years to build the more complicated craft (and I looked into having them built for me from the kits, by a professional boat builder, and the materials plus labor was around $20K for CLC SWer, B&B 17, and about $20K to have a dory shop build me a Swampscott Dory -- a bit over my social class :-). The GIS seems to be the only all-round row/sail boat I could imagine finishing in reasonable time not regret the slight expense and space it takes up in my small yard. My only misgivings for the GIS is that it cannot quite be pressed into service for an occasional sleep-aboard boat.

    I think the Tamanu is a great design -- it goes together relatively quickly, it will be a relative fast outrigger (but do not think you will beat beach-cats), it will be sea-worthy if build right, and you could paddle it just fine with two, good enough with one, but if you anticipate I need to get home quickly in a calm, then a 2 hp Honda is easy enough to bring along. It will take two adults just fine, three adults in moderate weather in-shore, but 4 adults not advised (I have gotten this info from an owner much experienced in the Tamanu). -- Wade
    Wow, that is a big money for a small plywood boat!
    I like the idea of hanging a small outboard on the transom of Tamanu to get back home dead upwind if needed. What do you think about the pace a single paddler could be expecting in Tamanu canoe?

  17. #17
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    Default Re: Goat island skiff and Tamanu outrigger canoe

    Quote Originally Posted by Gary Dierking View Post
    I'm a big fan of Michael Storer's work, especially his rudders and his optimization of the lug rig. So i now have the best of both worlds with my Tamanu equipped with his rudder, mounted on the side, and a scaled down standing lug rig.

    Gary
    Glad to have you here mr Dierking! What do you think about windsurfer rigs on a single outrigger Tamanu? I know that the other rigs are reefable and can be sailed in variety of conditions but using the windsurfer rigs I already own could lower the cost/build time significantly.

  18. #18
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    Default Re: Goat island skiff and Tamanu outrigger canoe

    Sorry for the delay,

    The Ulua handles the chop around me very well. Stability is great and I adjusted it depending on whether by using a couple old scuba diving weight belts strapped out on the ama. I gained more confidence adding the safety ama.

    I have sailed only in the Banana River so far (If you look for Port Canaveral or Cape Canaveral Florida on google maps you can see the area. The Banana River is the body of water just behind the barrier islands of Cape Canaveral and Cocoa Beach), which is shallow but kicks up a good chop with the wind off the Atlantic. I haven't taken it into the ocean yet, but plan to this summer.

    I added the broken wing safety ama so getting in and out of it has been no issue even in deeper water. I originally built it for snorkeling and scalloping off the west coast of Florida before life brought me to the east coast of Florida and I started a family. I made 2 mistakes, I did not follow the design for the layup of the crossbeams, and built them only from laminated cedar instead of a stronger layup which was light but not strong enough to withstand my second mistake. The second being I used a Sunfish sail rig which was about 150% of recommended size. This was really fun to sail on lighter wind days, easy to balance with paddle steering. Then I went out on a day that was way too windy (blowing 20mph), and snapped the crossbeams in the middle of the river. I was flying on a broad reach with the ama to lee charging through the chop. The iakos were bending and looked like shock absorbers and I had just made the decision to attempt a jibe and run back home because it was too rough out for my rig. The iakos broke about 6 inches from the gunnels on the ama side and the vaka did a slow roll into the water. It took me about 5 -10 minutes to gather all the pieces, strike the rig and lash it together. Then I proceeded to swim it back to shore and to my home canal, about 1/3 mile. I made some big mistakes with the rig and the iakos, but it was good learning. The vaka had plenty of flotation and when I lashed it up with both amas as floats it was only about half full of water. I didn't bother bailing any more out so the wind wouldn't push it around as a towed it back swimming.

    I'm gluing up new crossbeams according to specs in the design, along with the correct sized rig. I will also be adding a simple trampoline setup on the ama side as I finish the repairs this summer. I don't think I'd want a lot of weight out there while sailing with the ama I have so I won't let anyone sit or lay out there while sailing. I like to be able to hike and shift as needed to balance the boat.

    The plan is to sail, fish, and beach comb the spoil islands in the Mosquito Lagoon area with my kids nicely down in the canoe hull, and let them play on the trampoline while swimming or at the beach. The kids loved paddling in the canoe before I broke it (they were too small for me to be comfortable sailing with back then), and I've also run a little electric trolling motor on it. It was a lot of fun to build and I would do it again.

    Here is what the rig and setup looked like at the time:
    https://photos.app.goo.gl/TXr8f6Zu8V1dU8ar7

    Here is what it looked like after I swam it in, you can see a paddle floating in the hull.
    https://photos.app.goo.gl/YexWZEdccdTPRJnT7
    Jon
    Building: Ha! I have Toddlers. Just able to get back in the shop and start fixing.
    http://flsail.blogspot.com/
    Built: PK78 dinghy, EasyB canoe, Ulua

  19. #19
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    Default Re: Goat island skiff and Tamanu outrigger canoe

    Quote Originally Posted by rogypop View Post
    ... The thing is that I need lighter, nimble craft for wind and human power only. It is going to be used for singlehanded daysailing, weekend expeditions with some short blue water passages and occasional raids. ...

    ... 1... There is just one thing that concerns me (I could also be overthinking this), when capsized, goat seems to scoop a lot of water and I wonder would I be able to right the boat, board it and bail the water out by myself in a bigger
    seaway.

    ...but I would not like to deviate from plans if I start building GIS...

    ...2... Michael Storer designed a simple self bailing raid sail and oar boat (raid41?) but discarded the idea (I think) cause the boat was prone to right itself after capsize and leave sailor behind. I wish he made the plans available though.

    ...3... I like your proa, it reminds me of CLC mbuli proa, another crazy boat I used to daydream about.
    Hello Rogypop,

    ...1... Well, you cannot have the cake and eat it at the same time. Flotation Bags might help but they do not solve the problem. There will be a lot of water swamping after re-righting the boat and this must be bailed out. The only solution is a raised floor well above the "normal" waterline that provides enough bouyancy so that the boat is self bailing. Back in the boat you can concentrate on stabilizing the boat and begin carefully to sail. The water will be out in a few minutes and then you are ready to go on sailing.

    If you want to sail small cruises from Split to Brac and Hvar in the GIS its better to have self bailing abilities. The strong winds are coming fast and the distances between the islands are quite long.

    ...2... I read the article about Michael's Raid boat on his website but I cannot find it anymore. When I remenber right it was a mix between The GIS and Beth, pretty narrow. I cannot imagine that a dinghy rights itself after capsize. Thats impossible! You have to stand on your Daggerboard and when your boat is coming upright you have to grab it so that you don't loose contact ... this what you learn first in sailing school.

    ...3... Thank you. I got my inspiration from the style Dick Newick designed his Proas. The rest is sharpie design ... flat bottom and flaring sides. My sides are 4 and 5mm ply and tortured a little around my bulkheads. I will have side hung kick up rudders because I have to sail in flat waters. My rig will be a single mast with a balancing lug of 14m².

    Have fun! Michel
    Last edited by luckystrike118; 02-13-2019 at 08:50 PM.

  20. #20
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    Default Re: Goat island skiff and Tamanu outrigger canoe

    Quote Originally Posted by rogypop View Post
    Glad to have you here mr Dierking! What do you think about windsurfer rigs on a single outrigger Tamanu? I know that the other rigs are reefable and can be sailed in variety of conditions but using the windsurfer rigs I already own could lower the cost/build time significantly.
    It's been done by a couple of builders. While not reefable the shape and structure of modern windsurf sails allows them to handle a wider wind range than normal soft sails. Do use a stub mast to support it.

    KlausRiedl.jpg

    StubMastWindSurf.jpg

  21. #21
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    Default Re: Goat island skiff and Tamanu outrigger canoe

    [QUOTE=luckystrike118;5813037]...
    ...2... I read the article about Michael's Raid boat on his website but I cannot find it anymore. When I remenber right it was a mix between The GIS and Beth, pretty narrow. I cannot imagine that a dinghy rights itself after capsize. Thats impossible! You have to stand on your Daggerboard and when your boat is coming upright you have to grab it so that you don't loose contact ... this what you learn first in sailing school. .../QUOTE]

    --- One of things I heard about the Raid 41 was that the builder made the sitting area very slick and he slipped off, so, don't do that :-) I am not sure if he righted the boat first, then slipped off, and it sailed away without him. A tether or dragline in hindsight seems like a good idea. --Wade

  22. #22
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    Default Re: Goat island skiff and Tamanu outrigger canoe

    [QUOTE=luckystrike118;5813037]...
    ...2... I read the article about Michael's Raid boat on his website but I cannot find it anymore. When I remenber right it was a mix between The GIS and Beth, pretty narrow. I cannot imagine that a dinghy rights itself after capsize. Thats impossible! You have to stand on your Daggerboard and when your boat is coming upright you have to grab it so that you don't loose contact ... this what you learn first in sailing school. .../QUOTE]

    --- This is from message #106 (Design forum):

    "He righted from capsize, climbed back aboard and saw a bit of gear floating beside the boat, leant over to get it and fell overboard. Boat got a gust and sailed rather than fell straight over. I don't know if he had water ballast aboard at the time though. Looking at how deep the boat is in the video, I think it is possible.

    (Cor I can be dumb - Chuck's article said so)

    You can read it here.
    http://www.woodworkforums.com/showth...080#post975080

    To be very fair to Bryan (who is a very experienced small boat sailor) almost none of us would think of a tether for small boat sailing in all sorts of possible conditions. But just because we don't think of them doesn't mean that they should be neglected as a possibility. I think with a lot of modern small boats or even a fully traditional built boat they would be a real liability as there are too many things to catch on and get in a tangle, but for cleaner boats like the RAID41 they start making a lot more sense.

    We all use them on yachts, but only when the going gets tough or when it gets dark. But I would habitually look at them as a liability for small boat sailing. Not giving any advice in that statement - reporting my state of mind, which would be similar to Bryan's.

    If the water ballast tanks were full and kept the boat upright so it would sail ... I would not have been expecting that at all either. There was a LOT of wind.

    I think the only thing I would have done differently in Bryan's situation is not reach for the cushion.

    But I can't be sure

    So for small boats that have water ballast, in isolated conditions of sailing, then a tether starts to look like a good bet. Particularly if the boat has a clean layout.

    In the end there doesn't seem to have been a lot of real risk - lifejacket in Texas water within the ICW ... mainly the potential loss of the boat.

    So I think I would have a tether handy at least and modify my thoughts about when it becomes sensible to use."

    --Wade

  23. #23
    Join Date
    Jun 2018
    Location
    Split, Croatia
    Posts
    10

    Default Re: Goat island skiff and Tamanu outrigger canoe

    Quote Originally Posted by flsail View Post
    Sorry for the delay,

    The Ulua handles the chop around me very well. Stability is great and I adjusted it depending on whether by using a couple old scuba diving weight belts strapped out on the ama. I gained more confidence adding the safety ama.

    I have sailed only in the Banana River so far (If you look for Port Canaveral or Cape Canaveral Florida on google maps you can see the area. The Banana River is the body of water just behind the barrier islands of Cape Canaveral and Cocoa Beach), which is shallow but kicks up a good chop with the wind off the Atlantic. I haven't taken it into the ocean yet, but plan to this summer.

    I added the broken wing safety ama so getting in and out of it has been no issue even in deeper water. I originally built it for snorkeling and scalloping off the west coast of Florida before life brought me to the east coast of Florida and I started a family. I made 2 mistakes, I did not follow the design for the layup of the crossbeams, and built them only from laminated cedar instead of a stronger layup which was light but not strong enough to withstand my second mistake. The second being I used a Sunfish sail rig which was about 150% of recommended size. This was really fun to sail on lighter wind days, easy to balance with paddle steering. Then I went out on a day that was way too windy (blowing 20mph), and snapped the crossbeams in the middle of the river. I was flying on a broad reach with the ama to lee charging through the chop. The iakos were bending and looked like shock absorbers and I had just made the decision to attempt a jibe and run back home because it was too rough out for my rig. The iakos broke about 6 inches from the gunnels on the ama side and the vaka did a slow roll into the water. It took me about 5 -10 minutes to gather all the pieces, strike the rig and lash it together. Then I proceeded to swim it back to shore and to my home canal, about 1/3 mile. I made some big mistakes with the rig and the iakos, but it was good learning. The vaka had plenty of flotation and when I lashed it up with both amas as floats it was only about half full of water. I didn't bother bailing any more out so the wind wouldn't push it around as a towed it back swimming.

    I'm gluing up new crossbeams according to specs in the design, along with the correct sized rig. I will also be adding a simple trampoline setup on the ama side as I finish the repairs this summer. I don't think I'd want a lot of weight out there while sailing with the ama I have so I won't let anyone sit or lay out there while sailing. I like to be able to hike and shift as needed to balance the boat.

    The plan is to sail, fish, and beach comb the spoil islands in the Mosquito Lagoon area with my kids nicely down in the canoe hull, and let them play on the trampoline while swimming or at the beach. The kids loved paddling in the canoe before I broke it (they were too small for me to be comfortable sailing with back then), and I've also run a little electric trolling motor on it. It was a lot of fun to build and I would do it again.

    Here is what the rig and setup looked like at the time:
    https://photos.app.goo.gl/TXr8f6Zu8V1dU8ar7

    Here is what it looked like after I swam it in, you can see a paddle floating in the hull.
    https://photos.app.goo.gl/YexWZEdccdTPRJnT7
    Your boat has that wild Pacific look to it, it is beautiful! I will make structural members as strong as possible just to be safe of not being left swimming far from shore
    Quote Originally Posted by luckystrike118 View Post
    Hello Rogypop,



    If you want to sail small cruises from Split to Brac and Hvar in the GIS its better to have self bailing abilities. The strong winds are coming fast and the distances between the islands are quite long.

    Have fun! Michel
    Hi Michel! Yes, that is my sailing ground, I even plan sailing further, to Vis and Lastovo. Have you ever been sailing here in Croatia? I hope i will see your proa around one day
    Yes, distances between islands are quite big and just thinking about being out there with swamped boat that won't stay upright gives me chills.

    Quote Originally Posted by Gary Dierking View Post
    It's been done by a couple of builders. While not reefable the shape and structure of modern windsurf sails allows them to handle a wider wind range than normal soft sails. Do use a stub mast to support it.

    KlausRiedl.jpg

    StubMastWindSurf.jpg
    I thought about stub mast already, that red Tamanu with windsurfer rig is the first one I have seen and immediately fell in love with the hi tech -low tech concept of the rig and hull.

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